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Liberians accuse 2 boats of illegal fishing, seek $1 million

Liberians accuse 2 boats of illegal fishing, seek $1 million

Liberian authorities say they’ve impounded two foreign fishing vessels and are seeking $1 million in compensation. Defense Minister Brownie Samukai said Friday that one of the boats was a Chinese vessel that paid just $700 for a permit to import 40 tons of fish. However, he told state radio that officials found that the permit was being used for multiple vessels, carrying a total of 130 tons of fish. The other vessel is Spanish-owned but Senegalese-flagged. Liberian authorities are citing 25 vi…
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Mitigation priorities in the hands of fish and game

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game will spent time this spring planning and implementing mitigation measures for the Black Canyon Reservoir and Lower Payette River. In November 2016, the IDFG received funds from the 2013 mitigation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. Mitigation priorities in the hands of fish and game By DIANA BAIRD newsroom@messenger-index.com The Miami County Republic | 0 comments The mitigation was the result of a problem that occurred in 2013 when the BOR drew wate…
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Bill would prohibit fish farming in US Great Lakes waters

A member of Congress is sponsoring a bill to prohibit fish farming in waters of the Great Lakes within the United States. Democratic Rep. Dan Kildee of Michigan says poorly operated aquaculture facilities can increase pollution, destroy fish habitat, spread disease and introduce non-native species. Michigan has received proposals for net-like commercial fishing enclosures in the Great Lakes. There are none in U.S. Great Lakes waters at present, although Canada has allowed them. Kildee’s bill al…
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Miami Boat Show 2017 New Boats and Product Preview

Miami’s famed boat show — in its 76th year — opens Thursday, Feb. 15 at Miami Marine Stadium. This is the show’s second year at the on-water Virginia Key location. Miami Boat Show organizers predict that more than 100,000 boating enthusiasts from around the world will descend on the iconic Miami Marine Stadium on Rickenbacker Causeway for the event’s 76th appearance — Thursday, Feb. 15 through Monday, February 20 (President’s Day). The boat show is just in its second year at that locatio…
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Ohio bill would allow protective orders for dating violence

Ohio bill would allow protective orders for dating violence

A bipartisan bill in the Ohio House would allow victims of dating violence to seek a protective order against an alleged perpetrator. The bill would update current law which only recognizes violence between spouses, family members, those living together or family members for the purpose of seeking a protective order. Backers say Ohio and Georgia are the only states that don’t cover victims of dating violence under domestic violence laws. The proposal would give victims of dating violence access…
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When her friend’s son stopped by, she had no idea she’d end up fighting for her life

Alice Snodgrass was chatting with her longtime friend Nicki Alexopoulos in the living room when she saw a shadow outside her friend’s Brookside home. “That’s Patrick,” Alexopoulos said quietly as her 38-year-old son approached the door. When Patrick Alexopoulos entered the foyer that afternoon last October, Snodgrass saw her vivacious friend’s demeanor shift. Nicki became subdued and alarmed. Patrick wanted $25,000, and he wanted it now. Nicki, sitting quietly with her hands in her la…
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Violence spreads in Paris suburbs; 17 more arrests

A gang of masked rioters set more than a dozen vehicles ablaze in a car dealership as violence spread to more suburban Paris towns over the alleged rape of a young black man with a police baton, authorities said Wednesday. Police made 17 arrests, according to the prefecture of the Saint-Seine-Denis region, a working class region northeast of Paris with a large minority population. The violence, which has now spread to at least five towns, erupted after a 22-year-old man was allegedly sodomized …
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The Latest: Trump: No tolerance for violence against police

The Latest on President Donald Trump (all times EST): 8:40 p.m. The White House says President Donald Trump has written Chinese President Xi Jinping (shee jihn-peeng) to wish the “Chinese people a happy Lantern Festival and prosperous Year of the Rooster.” The White House says Trump wrote Xi to thank him for a congratulatory letter and to express his hopes of developing “a constructive relationship that benefits both the United States and China.” Before taking office, Trump …
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Brazilian governor wants more army troops to quell violence

A Brazilian governor said Wednesday that he needs more soldiers to help cope with a police crisis that has led to a wave of violence and at least 80 deaths in his southeastern state. Cesar Colnago, acting governor of Espirito Santo, told reporters that he would ask the federal government for more troops, saying the 1,000 soldiers already sent were not enough to stem the tide of violence. The killings in the state capital of Vitoria and other cities erupted as friends and family of military poli…
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Cooper seeks temporary block of Cabinet confirmation law

Cooper seeks temporary block of Cabinet confirmation law

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper is returning to court to try to prevent his Cabinet secretaries from being subjected to confirmation hearings starting this week that he argues are unconstitutional. Cooper’s outside lawyers asked a three-judge panel late Monday to temporarily block enforcement of the law directing his department heads be subject to the “advice and consent” of a majority of senators. Cooper spokesman Ford Porter said the hearing on the motion was expected Tuesday, a day …
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SPLC, advocates urge Miami-Dade to resist Trump over immigration enforcement

The SPLC and a broad coalition of advocates and legal scholars today urged Florida’s Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners to uphold a …
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ACLU: Miami-Dade mayor “duped” by President Trump on immigration detentions

Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez misread the law and the risk of losing federal aid when he tried to appease President Donald Trump by ordering local jails to detain inmates sought by immigration agents, a coalition of liberal advocacy groups wrote in a letter to county commissioners on Monday. “The County should not give in to President Trump’s bluster,” read the 10-page letter signed by local leaders of the American Civil Liberties Union, Service Employees International Union, Southern P…
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ACLU On Miami-Dade Mayor’s Immigration Decision: ‘County Is Going To Be Sued’

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Previously, Miami-Dade County held arrested immigrants if the feds asked, but only if they were charged with a serious, violent offense. People have taken to the streets protesting Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez’s decision to detain any immigrant who comes into the county jail system if immigration asks, even those charged with petty offenses. Now, the American Civil Liberties Union is urging citizens to call their county commissioners and lobby them to overturn the …
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Tennessee online sales tax rule draws legal challenge

Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday that the state’s move to require all major online vendors to collect sales taxes on purchases made in Tennessee has drawn a legal challenge. Under current federal law, online retailers can only be required to collect sales taxes if they have a physical presence in the state such as a store or office there. Consumers ordering from out-of-state retailers are technically required to pay the tax to the state Revenue Department, but few do. Haslam’s tax rule seeks to ext…
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Trump's immigration order faces mounting legal questions

Trump’s immigration order faces mounting legal questions

The legal fight over President Donald Trump’s ban on refugees is likely to turn on questions of a president’s authority to control America’s borders and on whether the new immigration policy unconstitutionally discriminates against Muslims. Civil liberties advocates have challenged the order, which temporarily suspends immigration from seven countries and the United States’ broader refugee program. It has drawn nationwide protests since the order was issued on Friday. Federal judges in New York…
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Universities urging international students, faculty to avoid…

CORAL GABLES, Fla. – University of Miami law student Niki Namezi was one of hundreds of students who packed into a lecture hall on Monday to listen to Muneer Ahamd, a Yale professor, speak about President Donald Trump’s executive order that calls for a travel ban directed at seven Muslim-majority nations. The order has caused confusion as some remain unclear as to how it affects U.S. green card holders.  Officials have said that green card holders who are returning to the U.S. wil…
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After Roof trial, SC addressing faith, violence intersection

After Roof trial, SC addressing faith, violence intersection

The federal trial of the South Carolina man who slaughtered nine Bible study participants has come and gone, with Dylann Roof’s death sentence assuring he will spend the rest of his limited days in custody. But the June 2015 shootings at Emanuel AME continue to prompt a conversation about the uneasy intersection of faith and gun violence, as thousands of worshippers around South Carolina gather this weekend to memorialize crime victims and call for reform. It isn’t just the church slaughter tha…
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Young survivors: A WLRN project on the unspoken trauma of gun violence

For Aaron Willis, a Booker T. Washington High student partially paralyzed by an unknown shooter in Wynwood, putting his life back together has proven a grueling emotional challenge — both for him and his family. Willis is one of hundreds of young people in Miami-Dade County who have survived bullet wounds, an experience that leaves psychological scars that have not been well-researched. In a special projected Young Survivors: The Unspoken Trauma of Gun Violence, WLRN-Miami Herald News chronic…
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Rimon Law Opens Office in Miami With Addition of Florida Partners

Rimon Law Opens Office in Miami With Addition of Florida Partners

The two name partners of Alvarez Gonzalez, a one-year-old international litigation and white-collar defense law firm, have joined Rimon Law to …
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Justices to hear free speech clash over offensive trademarks

Justices to hear free speech clash over offensive trademarks

In a First Amendment clash over a law barring offensive trademarks, the Supreme Court on Wednesday raised doubts about a government program that favors some forms of speech but rejects others that might disparage certain groups. The justices heard arguments in a dispute involving an Asian-American band called the Slants that was denied a trademark because the U.S. Patent and Trademark office said the name is offensive to Asians. Justice Elena Kagan reflected the concerns of several justices when she said government programs are not supposed to make a distinction based on viewpoint. “The point is that I can say good things about something, but I can’t say bad things about something,” she said. “And I would have thought that that was a fairly classic case of viewpoint discrimination.” The Oregon-based band says the 70-year-old law violates free-speech rights. A federal appeals court had ruled that the law is unconstitutional, but the government appealed. A victory for the band would be welcome news for the Washington Redskins, embroiled in their own legal fight over the team’s name. The trademark office canceled the football team’s lucrative trademarks in 2014 after finding the word “Redskins” is disparaging to Native Americans. But the justices also seemed concerned that imposing absolutely no limits on trademark names might go too far. At issue is a law that prohibits registration of marks that “may disparage … persons, living or dead, institutions, beliefs or national symbols.” A trademark confers certain legal benefits, including the power to sue competitors that infringe upon the trademark. Slants founder Simon Tam says his goal was to reclaim a derisive slur and transform it into a badge of ethnic pride. But the trademark office said a term can be disparaging even when used in a positive light. A federal appeals court sided with the band, ruling that the law violates the First Amendment. The Obama administration wants the high court to overturn that ruling. Justice Department lawyer Malcolm Stewart told the justices that the law does not restrict speech because the band is still free to use the name even without trademark protection. Stewart said the government was concerned about allowing trademarks for racial slurs, religious insults and the “vilest racial epithets” that distract consumers and hinder commerce. Justice Stephen Breyer wasn’t impressed, saying he could think of “perhaps 50,000 examples of instances where the space the trademark provides is used for very distracting messages.” “What business does Congress have picking out this one, but letting all the other distractions exist?” Breyer asked. Justice Anthony Kennedy compared the trademark program to copyrights, noting that the government can’t bar disparaging copyrights. “We have a culture in which we have tee shirts and logos and rock bands and so forth that are expressing a point of view,” Kennedy said. “They are using the market to express views.” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said the law wasn’t being enforced consistently, noting that the term “Heeb” was approved in one trademark application, but not in another. The term is considered offensive to Jews. John Connell, attorney for the Slants’ founder, said the First Amendment should allow trademark approval of virtually any expression without limits. But some justices seemed to think his argument went too far. The trademark law, for example, places restrictions on words that are libelous or cause confusion in the marketplace. “You want us to say that trademark law is just like a public park” where people can say whatever they want, Kennedy told Connell. “Good-bye. That’s it. That’s your argument.” Justice Sonia Sotomayor wondered about libelous trademarks. What if someone tried to register “Trump is a thief” before the president-elect became a public figure, she asked. Connell said that should be allowed. “That makes no sense,” Sotomayor said. Breyer noted that the Slants are free to use their name in all kinds of ways, just not in the trademark itself. “This is not a general expression program,” Breyer said. “It stops nobody from saying anything.” Like the Slants, the Redskins say their name is meant to honor American Indians. But the team has spent years fighting legal challenges from Native American groups that say it’s a racial slur. A federal judge upheld the trademark office’s cancellation of the name and the team is appealing. The matter is on hold pending the outcome of the Slants case. A ruling in that case is expected by the end of June.
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School voucher program survives teacher union’s attempt to kill it

Florida’s teachers union struck out Wednesday in its latest effort to dismantle a tax credit scholarship program as the state’s Supreme Court rejected the union’s appeal for legal standing to challenge the voucher-like program that finances students from low-performing schools who want to attend private schools. The Florida Education Association and other plaintiffs, including the NAACP, allege the scholarships are unconstitutional because the program diverts money that would otherwise go…
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Grant to Miami Firm Will Fund Legal Program at Middle School

Miami law firm Hamilton, Miller & Birthisel was awarded a $100,000 grant to help fund a mock courtroom and a legal curriculum at Brownsville Middle …
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Enough: Negotiate a settlement with the 9/11 masterminds

As the surviving spouse of a 9/11 murder victim, Sareve Dukat, I want closure. I was an observer at the Guantánamo military commission pretrial hearings of the five defendants in the 9/11 hijackings and mass murder litigation in February 2015. Having listened to the litany of legal maneuvering, and having followed the proceedings for almost two years since I was there, the posturing continues ad nauseam. The proceedings are elaborate performances that have little to do with guilt or innocence….
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Justices raise doubts over law barring offensive trademarks

In a First Amendment clash over a law barring offensive trademarks, the Supreme Court on Wednesday raised doubts about a government program that favors some forms of speech but rejects others that might disparage certain groups. The justices heard arguments in a dispute involving an Asian-American band called the Slants that was denied a trademark because the U.S. Patent and Trademark office said the name is offensive to Asians. Justice Elena Kagan reflected the concerns of several justices when she said government programs are not supposed to make a distinction based on viewpoint. “The point is that I can say good things about something, but I can’t say bad things about something,” she said. “And I would have thought that that was a fairly classic case of viewpoint discrimination.” The Oregon-based band says the 70-year-old law violates free-speech rights. A federal appeals court had ruled that the law is unconstitutional, but the government appealed. A victory for the band would be welcome news for the Washington Redskins, embroiled in their own legal fight over the team’s name. The trademark office canceled the football team’s lucrative trademarks in 2014 after finding the word “Redskins” is disparaging to Native Americans. But the justices also seemed concerned that imposing absolutely no limits on trademark names might go too far. At issue is a law that prohibits registration of marks that “may disparage … persons, living or dead, institutions, beliefs or national symbols.” A trademark confers certain legal benefits, including the power to sue competitors that infringe upon the trademark. Slants founder Simon Tam says his goal was to reclaim a derisive slur and transform it into a badge of ethnic pride. But the trademark office said a term can be disparaging even when used in a positive light. A federal appeals court sided with the band, ruling that the law violates the First Amendment. The Obama administration wants the high court to overturn that ruling. Justice Department lawyer Malcolm Stewart told the justices that the law does not restrict speech because the band is still free to use the name even without trademark protection. Stewart said the government was concerned about allowing trademarks for racial slurs, religious insults and the “vilest racial epithets” that distract consumers and hinder commerce. Justice Stephen Breyer wasn’t impressed, saying he could think of “perhaps 50,000 examples of instances where the space the trademark provides is used for very distracting messages.” “What business does Congress have picking out this one, but letting all the other distractions exist?” Breyer asked. Justice Anthony Kennedy compared the trademark program to copyrights, noting that the government can’t bar disparaging copyrights. “We have a culture in which we have tee shirts and logos and rock bands and so forth that are expressing a point of view,” Kennedy said. “They are using the market to express views.” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said the law wasn’t being enforced consistently, noting that the term “Heeb” was approved in one trademark application, but not in another. The term is considered offensive to Jews. John Connell, attorney for the Slants’ founder, said the First Amendment should allow trademark approval of virtually any expression without limits. But some justices seemed to think his argument went too far. The trademark law, for example, places restrictions on words that are libelous or cause confusion in the marketplace. “You want us to say that trademark law is just like a public park” where people can say whatever they want, Kennedy told Connell. “Good-bye. That’s it. That’s your argument.” Justice Sonia Sotomayor wondered about libelous trademarks. What if someone tried to register “Trump is a thief” before the president-elect became a public figure, she asked. Connell said that should be allowed. “That makes no sense,” Sotomayor said. Breyer noted that the Slants are free to use their name in all kinds of ways, just not in the trademark itself. “This is not a general expression program,” Breyer said. “It stops nobody from saying anything.” Like the Slants, the Redskins say their name is meant to honor American Indians. But the team has spent years fighting legal challenges from Native American groups that say it’s a racial slur. A federal judge upheld the trademark office’s cancellation of the name and the team is appealing. The matter is on hold pending the outcome of the Slants case. A ruling in that case is expected by the end of June.
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US/Cuba Interior Ministry Sign Law Enforcement Deal

US/Cuba Interior Ministry Sign Law Enforcement Deal

Follow CBSMIAMI.COM: Facebook | Twitter HAVANA (CBSmiami/AP) — Despite objections by Republicans who feel that the U.S. should limit its dealings with the regime of Cuban leader Raul Castro, the Obama administration and Cuba’s Interior Ministry have agreed to share information on international criminal activity such as terrorism, human trafficking and money laundering. The State Department signed the memorandum of understanding Monday with the Cuban Interior Ministry, which is responsib…
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Bikers Race Through Streets For “Wheels Up, Guns Down” Amid Crackdown

Follow CBSMIAMI.COM: Facebook | Twitter MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Motorcycles, ATVs, and dirt bikes flooded the streets and highways of South Florida Monday afternoon and night, performing reckless wheelies and weaving in and out of traffic. The annual Martin Luther King Day “Wheels Up, Guns Down” motorized madness saw people hurt and killed. Motorcyclists could be seen speeding through the streets of Miami around 2:3o p.m.  They made their way up I-95 through Miami, and west into Opa …
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Knights of Malta insist ouster over condom scandal was legal

The head of the embattled Knights of Malta is seeking to discredit a Vatican investigation into the removal of a top official over a condom scandal, insisting that he followed the rules in the dismissal. In the latest development in the remarkable showdown between the ancient Catholic lay order and the Holy See, Fra’ Matthew Festing explained and defended his actions in a Jan. 14 letter to the Knights’ membership. “Suffice it to say, whilst I was trying to enjoy a peaceful Advent and Chris…
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Report: Airport Officials Detain Cubans with Legal Visas in ‘Wet Foot/Dry Foot’ Chaos

“These Cuban travelers have tourism visas. They are being detained or deported,” Ramón Saúl Sánchez, the head of Miami’s Democracy Movement advocacy group, told Miami’s El Nuevo Herald over the weekend. “Those being detained within the airport include people of advanced age, including one blind man, many of them ill,” he added. He also said those detained told him they were told they would be forced into a detention center for weeks. Luis Felipe Rojas, th…
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US, Cuban Interior Ministry sign law-enforcement deal

The Obama administration and Cuba’s Interior Ministry have agreed to share information on international criminal activity such as terrorism, human trafficking and money laundering despite Republican objections to U.S. law-enforcement cooperation with President Raul Castro’s government. The State Department signed the memorandum of understanding Monday with the Cuban Interior Ministry, which is responsible for internal security in Cuba, including crackdowns on political dissidents. The signing i…
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Miami Law Launches Black Lives Matter Interdisciplinary Course

Miami Law Launches Black Lives Matter Interdisciplinary Course

The University of Miami School of Law is entering the important national debate on the state of racial justice in the United States. In Spring 2017, the School of Law will be convening an interdisciplinary course called “Race, Class, and Power: University Course on Ferguson and the #BlackLivesMatter Movement.”  The course will engage the multiple lenses through which Ferguson, the Black Lives Matter movement, and racial justice in the U.S. might be explored. It includes examining issues …
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REAL ESTATE PARALEGAL FOR MIAMI LAW FIRM!

Robert Half once again was named to FORTUNE® magazine’s list of “World’s Most Admired Companies” and was the highest-ranked staffing firm. (March 1, 2016) In 2016, Robert Half was named a Top Corporation for Women’s Business Enterprises by WBENC, the nation’s leader in women’s business development. © 2017 Robert Half International Inc. An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/Disability/Veterans….
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Israeli police arrest 9 following Palestinian truck attack

Israeli police arrest 9 following Palestinian truck attack

Israeli police stepped up security measures in Arab neighborhoods in east Jerusalem on Monday, searching trucks and arresting relatives of the Palestinian truck driver who rammed his vehicle into a crowd of Israeli soldiers at a Jerusalem tourist spot the previous day, killing four soldiers and injuring 17 others. Nine people were arrested, five of them relatives of 28-year-old Fadi Qunbar, the attacker. All arrested were from the Jabel Mukaber neighborhood of east Jerusalem where Qunbar lived,…
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Enough violence

Fabiola Santiago wrote a touching and insightful article on Jan. 4 regarding the high numbers of victims of gun violence in Miami-Dade’s poorest communities. She made an excellent point mentioning that if this level of violence was occurring in wealthier communities, the National Guard would have been deployed and the violent crimes solved. Right below Santiago’s column, there was a story about the fatal police shooting of an unarmed young black man in West Perrine. Jamar Rollins was only 2…
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West Bank settlements no excuse for violence

The U.N. should spend its time trying to convert the mindset of the Palestinian Authority, Fatah, and Hamas, rather than waste time on Israeli settlements. Were the West Bank settlements the reason the Arabs attacked Israel in 1948, when the U.N. resolution established Arab segments and the Jewish state? Were the West Bank settlements the reason in 1964 when the PLO and its 29-clause charter were created? Clause 24 stated, “This organization does not exercise any sovereignty in the West Bank …
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Pakistani groups note drop in violence, credit the military

Two Pakistani research groups have noted that the country saw a significant drop in militant violence last year, crediting the military for the decrease in attacks. The two Islamabad-based groups say that large-scale military operations in the lawless tribal regions bordering Afghanistan, in the chaotic port city of Karachi and the sparsely populated Baluchistan province are behind the drop. But for the trend to continue, they say, authorities need to disband sectarian and anti-Indian extremist…
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Gun violence

Robert Pickford’s letter of Jan. 5, “Chicago fire,” made my blood boil! This is so typical of gun advocates, saying guns are not the cause but the means of the violence. That’s like saying too many cars are not the cause of traffic jams. It’s not that simple! It’s too many guns and too many gangs and, of course, a lack of leadership on all sides. All of those things must be corrected or the violence will never stop. But then when he said that our first black president did not give t…
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Tips And No Tricks

5 Keys to a Happy Marriage

A happy marriage is not an accident, you have to play your part...


Children Learn Violence From A Young Age

We may be playing a bigger role then we think in youth violence....

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