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The Latest: Kenya official blames extremists for sabotage

The Latest: Kenya official blames extremists for sabotage

The Latest on Kenya’s elections to be held on Tuesday. (All times local): 10:25 p.m. Many residents in Nairobi engaged in last minute shopping on the eve of elections and while others made travel plans to leave the capital city after Tuesday’s vote. Alfred Nganga, a press liaison for Nakumatt, Kenya’s largest supermarket chain, said the volume of customers Monday was the largest in recent weeks. Elizabeth Obeiro, an accountant said she stocked up on supplies when she realized there might be a s…
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Jarvis Landry is under investigation for battery

Jarvis Landry is one of the few players the Miami Dolphins cannot afford to lose for any length of time, but according to Andy Slater on his website, …
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Dolphins WR Jarvis Landry under investigation for possible domestic battery

The Miami Dolphins are aware that wide receiver Jarvis Landry is reportedly under investigation for possible battery, head coach Adam Gase told reporters on Monday. Time_Sports To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Miami Dolphins wide receiver Jarvis Landry (14) during training camp at Baptist Health Training Facility at Nova Southeastern University. (Photo: Steve Mitchell, USA TODAY Sports) Miami Dolphins wide receiver Jarvis Landry is unde…
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Broward State Attorney’s Office Reviewing Investigation Into Dolphins WR Jarvis Landry

Follow CBSMIAMI.COM: Facebook | Twitter DAVIE (CBSMiami) – The Miami Dolphins are in the national spotlight due to the injury to Ryan Tannehill and subsequent signing of Jay Cutler. In the midst of all the quarterback drama, another situation has crept its way into the headlines. Dolphins star receiver Jarvis Landry is being investigated for a possible domestic violence issue. The Broward State Attorney’s Office has confirmed to CBS4 that the Fort Lauderdale Police has presented the SAO …
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Dolphins’ Jarvis Landry under investigation for domestic violence

Miami Dolphins wide receiver Jarvis Landry is currently under investigation by police for battery after an incident with his girlfriend, Dolphins coach Adam Gase told the media. The investigation was first reported by Slater Scoops, which has details. The authorities have not yet decided whether to file charges. This is yet another troubling case of potential domestic violence in the NFL. While NFL teams have refused to sign Colin Kaepernick for his social justice activism—including the Dol…
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Decline in numbers of baby lobsters prompts rules talk

Decline in numbers of baby lobsters prompts rules talk

Interstate fishing regulators say the way the lobster fishery is managed needs to be fine-tuned because of a drop in the number of baby lobsters in New England waters. The American lobster fishery is based in the Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank regions, which stretch from Canada to Massachusetts. University of Maine marine scientist Rick Wahle (WAHL’-ee) has said the population of baby lobsters appears to be declining in parts of those areas. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission said …
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Did a Miami Man Really Catch a Fish in South Beach Floodwater Yesterday?

Miami flooded in Biblical proportions last night, thanks in part to rising seas and a warming planet. This goes without saying, but the deluge devastated Miami Beach business owners, people who own oceanfront property, and anyone who likes driving through streets that aren’t clogged with rainwater. However, the flooding has been wonderful for viral-video content producers and the hapless internet sleuths tasked with separating fact from fiction in the screaming maelstrom that is the 2017 s…
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Oil removed from fishing boat aground on Central Coast

The Coast Guard says all oil and hazardous materials have been removed from a commercial fishing vessel that went aground near Estero Bluffs State Park on the San Luis Obispo County shoreline. The fishing boat Point Estero was reported aground early Friday and contractors were hired to remove the potential pollutants. The Coast Guard says the removal operation was completed Tuesday afternoon. The scenic stretch of coastline is about 10 miles north of Morro Bay….
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Interior won’t change Montana monument designation

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said Wednesday he will not recommend changes to Montana’s Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument as he continues to review national monuments for possible elimination or reduction. Zinke said the monument is one of the only free-flowing areas of the Missouri that remains as explorers Lewis and Clark saw it more than 200 years ago. Montana Gov. Steve Bullock had asked Zinke to keep the Breaks monument unchanged as he reviews 27 national monuments designated by previous presidents. President Donald Trump ordered the review, calling many monument designations unwarranted land grabs by the federal government. Monument designations protect federal land from energy development and other activities. The Montana monument is the fourth Zinke has removed from his review ahead of a final report due later this month. Others removed from consideration are in Colorado, Idaho and Washington state. Twenty-three other national monuments, mostly in the West, face curtailing or elimination of protections put in place over the past two decades by presidents from both parties. Monuments under review include Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante in Utah, Nevada’s Basin and Range and Katahdin Woods and Waters in Maine. Zinke, a former Montana congressman, said in June that he was unlikely to recommend changes to the 586-square-mile (1,520-square-kilometer) Upper Missouri monument that President Bill Clinton created in 2001. Zinke’s announcement about the monument in his home state did little to appease his critics, including a hunting and fishing group that supported Zinke’s confirmation as interior secretary but now is expressing frustration over what it calls the “misguided” monument review. The group, the Backcountry Hunters & Anglers, launched a $1.4 million advertising blitz Wednesday across Montana to pressure Zinke to retain current designations for all 27 monuments under review. The group is focusing on Montana because “this is where the secretary is from, where he grew up … went hunting and fishing,” said CEO Land Tawney. When it comes to public lands access, “so goes Montana, so goes the rest of the country,” Tawney said.
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Peacock Bass in Miami

ONLY THE BEST FLY FISHING VIDEOS … Peacock Bass in Miami … off his local waters around Miami, where surprisingly big peacock bass swim.
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Tropical Storm Emily: Power outages, rain, fishermen rescued

Tropical Storm Emily: Power outages, rain, fishermen rescued

Tropical Storm Emily weakened to a tropical depression Monday afternoon as it slogged eastward across the Florida peninsula, spreading drenching rains, causing power outages and leaving two fishermen to be rescued from Tampa Bay. The National Hurricane Center said Emily made landfall late Monday on Florida’s Gulf Coast south of Tampa Bay and then began moving east toward the Atlantic coast. Emily spent only a few hours as a tropical storm, losing strength as it marched inland across the central…
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Fishing managers to meet over Trump official’s flounder rule

Interstate fishing regulators are meeting to discuss a Trump administration decision they say has the ability to jeopardize conservation of marine resources on the East Coast. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission is meeting Tuesday in Alexandria, Virginia. The commission has disagreed recently with U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross over a decision he made about summer flounder fishing. The commission announced in June it had found New Jersey out of compliance with management of …
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New rules to help southern New England lobsters up for vote

A plan to try to slow the decline of southern New England’s lobster population with new fishing restrictions is up for a potential final vote this week. The population of lobsters off Connecticut, Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts has plummeted in recent years. The regulatory Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission is considering a host of new restrictions about lobster fishing at a meeting on Tuesday. Proposed management tools have included changes to legal harvesting size, reduction…
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Massachusetts gov signs bill making changes to marijuana law

Massachusetts gov signs bill making changes to marijuana law

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker said Friday he remained wary of the impact legalized recreational marijuana might have on the state, yet hopeful that revisions made in the voter-approved law would ease some of his biggest concerns. The Republican spoke after signing a compromise bill approved by lawmakers last week that raises taxes on retail pot, establishes stringent requirements for the packaging and labeling of marijuana products, and spells out procedures cities and towns must follow if they wish to ban or restrict pot shops from opening in their communities. Baker also indicated a willingness to provide more funding to marijuana regulators, if they need it, a key concern of the group that sponsored the November ballot question. “I worry terribly about what the consequences over time will be and having spent a lot of time talking to folks in Colorado and in Washington … there are a lot of pitfalls we have to avoid,” said Baker, referring to two of the first U.S. states to legalize recreational marijuana. “But, look, the people voted this and I think it’s important that we put the program in place and deliver a workable, safe, productive recreational marijuana market for them in Massachusetts, the governor added. The revised law sets a maximum 20 percent combined state and local tax rate on recreational pot, up from the maximum 12 percent combined rate in the ballot question. Medical marijuana, which was approved by voters in 2012, would remain untaxed. Under rules for packaging and labeling, all marijuana products, including edibles, would have to be sold in child-resistant packages with the concentration of THC — the psychoactive chemical in marijuana — listed on the package. “We want it to be a responsible industry that sells safe products to consenting adults and doesn’t market products to children and teenagers,” said Democratic Sen. Jason Lewis, who led a delegation of legislators on a fact-finding trip to Colorado last year and later opposed the ballot question. The revamped law would allow local elected officials in municipalities where a majority of voters rejected the ballot question to ban or limit marijuana establishments. But in communities where a majority of voters supported legalization restrictions on pot shops would require a referendum. Some legal experts have suggested the compromise language on local control could leave the law open to a constitutional challenge under the principle of equal protection. The state budget for the fiscal year that started July 1 includes only $2 million for the Cannabis Control Commission, a five-member board that must be formed by Sept. 1 to oversee both recreational and medical marijuana. State treasurer Deb Goldberg, responsible for naming the board’s chairman, has said the commission would need up to $10 million in the first year. Jim Borghesani, spokesman for the ballot question group, found the governor’s pledge reassuring. “Right now a $2 million appropriation doesn’t even cover the software that’s necessary to get this system up and running,” he said.
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FBI, tech company help cops hack iPhone in Miami reality TV star’s “sextortion case”

On Uncle Sam’s dime, an outside tech company helped state investigators finally hack into the iPhone of a Miami reality TV star accused of extorting a Miami socialite over stolen sex videos. Text messages on the phone of Hencha Voigt appear to undermine her defense. They seem to show Voigt and her then-boyfriend actively plotting to get $18,000 from a social-media celebrity known as YesJulz, in exchanging for not releasing the video clips to the Internet. “We on some Bonnie Clyde sh*t I cou…
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More than 1300 Cuban migrants are being held in detention centers across the US

They are teachers, engineers or farmers, all seeking freedom in the United States. But after an unexpected policy change and an end to special treatment that allowed the majority of Cuban migrants to remain legally in the country, more than 1,300 are now being held at detention centers across the country waiting for their fate to be decided by immigration judges. “What I heard were stories of people who felt that they literally could not live in Cuba anymore,” said Wendi Adelson, executive …
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British baby Charlie Gard dies, was center of legal battle

Charlie Gard, the terminally ill British baby at the center of a legal and ethical battle that attracted the attention of Pope Francis and U.S. President Donald Trump, died Friday. He was one week shy of his first birthday. Charlie’s parents fought for the right to take him to the United States for an experimental medical treatment for his rare genetic disease, mitochondrial depletion syndrome, which left him brain damaged and unable to breathe unaided. His case ended up in the courts when doct…
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Regional rights body tells Argentina to free jailed activist

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights said Friday that Argentina’s government should release jailed social activist Milagro Sala. The commission said in a statement that there are many risk factors surrounding her detention, including alleged harassment, aggressions and a death threat. It granted a precautionary measure in favor of Sala stating that Argentina is obligated to fulfill a U.N. panel’s resolution last year saying she was arbitrarily detained and asked the government for her …
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South Sudan sexual violence on 'massive scale,' report says

South Sudan sexual violence on ‘massive scale,’ report says

It’s been five months since the shy, frail 13-year-old was snatched from his bed, drugged and raped in the middle of the night. The boy hasn’t been able to say much since. “I don’t remember a lot,” Batista says, darting his eyes toward the dirt floor as he sits in a makeshift clinic in one of South Sudan’s displaced people’s camps in the town of Wau. The Associated Press is using only the boy’s first name to protect his identity. Four years into South Sudan’s devastating civil war, the world’s …
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Miami Marlins’ Dee Gordon Gets Kicked By Young Cincinnati Reds Fan

Sometimes children have irrational thoughts when it comes to winning and losing in sports. And those ideas can involve violence if necessary, as this young Cincinnati Reds fan showed the Miami Marlins‘ Dee Gordon before their game on Sunday afternoon. It seems this youngster’s tactics may have paid off, as the Reds topped Miami 6-3 in the game. But let’s not reinforce this type of behavior – or at least wait until the playoffs….
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New initiative aimed at gun violence announced in Memphis

A new initiative in the Memphis area will toughen penalties for gun violence. Media outlets report officials announced Monday the campaign will focus on aggressive investigations, prosecutions seeking maximum sentences, and advertising that will send a clear message to offenders. Violent crime in Memphis has increase 10 percent in the first six months of 2017 compared to the same period of last year. Shelby County District Attorney Amy Weirich says the community is fed up with gun crimes. Count…
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AP PHOTOS: American black women feel it’s time to get a gun

A minister posing with a church manual in one hand and a 9 mm handgun in the other. A tax analyst cradling her AR-15 semi-automatic. A flight attendant taking aim, her blue fingernail polish glowing alongside the Glock 40. A banker in a black summer dress checking the chamber. They are among the American black women now picking up firearms and learning how to shoot. Most say they want to protect their homes, families and themselves. “What’s going to happen if something goes bump in the night?” …
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Indianapolis anti-crime group says Pence attending event

An Indianapolis anti-violence group says Vice President Mike Pence will return to his home state as the main speaker for its fundraising luncheon next month. Pence also is scheduled to take part Aug. 11 in a Statehouse ceremony unveiling his official Indiana governor’s portrait. The Indy Ten Point Coalition says Pence will speak during its luncheon at a downtown Indianapolis hotel. Tickets for the luncheon start at $250 a person. Ticket packages range from $1,500 to $25,000. The coalition’s web…
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Trump fires off volley of angry tweets on Russia probe

Trump fires off volley of angry tweets on Russia probe

Hours before he was to help commission a new aircraft carrier at a patriotic ceremony on the Virginia coast, President Donald Trump fired off a volley of early morning tweets that again showed how furious he remains over multiple investigations into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election. The tweets were unusual in their breadth and scope, even for Trump, given the wide variety of topics he touched on as Saturday dawned. His 10 tweets, all sent within two hours starting before 6:30 …
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Who’s in charge at Plant Food and Wine? Depends on who you ask

It’s business as usual for customers of Plant Food and Wine, a popular Wynwood restaurant dishing out fine vegan and raw cuisine. But behind the scenes, a nasty legal fight continues to brew. Matthew Kenney brought his brand of plant-based cuisine to Miami and the restaurant, but amid a $1.4 million lawsuit against him, the celebrity chef disputes who now controls Plant Food and Wine. Meanwhile, his legal troubles continue to simmer in Maine, California and even faraway Thailand. Kenney, who …
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Miami lobbyist’s business made $1 million profit on state anti-hazing contract

Already a subscriber, but don’t have a login? A business co-founded by a lobbyist pocketed $1 million profit from state anti-hazing program, made campaign donations, paid lobbyists. To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Educational Management Services claims it spent $660,000 of the $1.7 million it received to produce, “Hazing Solutions,” an online course that only taught 95 students at one university. Arek Sarkissian/Naples MIAMI – A b…
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Another day, another derailment in NYC subway

Another day, another derailment. And another round of finger-pointing on who is to blame for problems with New York City’s troubled transit system. On Friday, a “B” train derailed near the end of the line in Brooklyn, causing no major injuries but briefly gumming up a subway system that has seen its share of horror shows lately. “This derailment is indicative of a creaking mass transit system that needs urgent upgrades to fit the needs of a 21st century city,” Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams tweeted. Last month, a Harlem subway derailment tossed around riders and forced hundreds to evacuate through darkened tunnels. In another case, riders were trapped for nearly an hour on a sweltering train with no air conditioning. On Wednesday, a Long Island Rail Road train derailed. One rider tweeted Friday: “Glad no one was hurt on the derailment but the ripple effect is … can I get a note for work? Again” The subway problems aren’t even technically part of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s aptly named “summer of hell,” which refers instead to summer-long track work and corresponding schedule cutbacks for suburban commuter trains at Penn Station. So far, that hell hasn’t materialized, and both Cuomo and Amtrak officials have said the work to replace aging equipment and track at the nation’s busiest train station is going well. But within the five boroughs, riders haven’t been so lucky. The number of subway delays has tripled in the past five years, to 70,000 per month, and rush hour cancellations and delays on the Long Island Rail Road were at the highest level in 10 years, according to a report last month. About 5.7 million people ride the subway on an average weekday. “The summer of hell is turning into the summer of fear,” said Nick Sifuentes, Deputy Director of the Riders Alliance. And the contentious squabbling between Cuomo and Mayor Bill de Blasio on management of the crisis boiled over again this week, mostly on whether the city or state governments should be paying more. The current five-year MTA capital plan, which covers upkeep for the subways, the Long Island Rail Road and Metro-North, plus other pieces of the transit system, is about $29 billion. The city has pledged $2.5 billion and the state $8.3 billion, plus Cuomo recently pledged an additional $1 billion. “The state has put in more money than ever before in the history of the state, and it’s the city’s legal obligation to be funding it, even though we stepped in on a moral level,” Cuomo told reporters Thursday. His statements prompted a fast rebuke from the mayor’s office. “New Yorkers need serious leadership at a time like this,” city spokesman Austin Finan said. “The city’s unprecedented $2.5 billion commitment in the state-run MTA capital plan is far in excess of any legal obligation. Let’s stop the diversions and obfuscation and start spending the resources the MTA has on the repairs and maintenance that will keep New Yorkers moving.” Their debate prompted a history lesson by Metropolitan Transportation Authority head Joe Lhota on how the messy ownership structure came to be. He said a 1981 law was meant to help the city during a major financial crisis, when it could not pay capital costs and the subways were in much worse shape than they are now. The state picked up the tab, but it was never meant to be permanent, he said. He said the city now has a surplus of about $4 billion, and he’s going to submit an emergency plan to deal with the crisis. And he expects the city to chip in.
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Ex-Prosecutor Goes From Seeing Cases in Black and White to Adding Shades of Gray

At that time he was 33, Harvard-educated and a rising star in the legal … launch his own Miami law firm, Rivero Mestre, with partner Jorge A. Mestre.
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Man overboard uses prosthetic leg to stay afloat

Man overboard uses prosthetic leg to stay afloat

An Ohio man says his prosthetic leg helped save his life after he went overboard during a fishing trip. Adam Shannon, of Doylestown, says he was fishing on Dohner Lake near his home Monday evening when a seat on his boat broke, sending him into the water. Shannon’s prosthetic leg came off as he went into the lake. The 45-year-old was able to use his prosthetic as a floatation device when it got trapped in his pants and filled with air. Shannon called 911 for help, and his yelling attracted the …
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South Africa searches for 8 missing fishermen after capsize

Maritime emergency teams in South Africa are searching for eight missing fishermen whose boat capsized several days ago, killing at least one crewmember. Seven of the 16 crewmembers were rescued after the accident early Sunday off Cape St. Francis in Eastern Cape province. One body was recovered. President Jacob Zuma on Wednesday said emergency workers “will not rest” until they find the missing crewmembers from the fishing vessel Maredon. South African media reported high waves and strong wind…
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GOP targets Endangered Species Act as protections lifted

Congressional Republicans are moving forward with legislation to roll back the Endangered Species Act, amid complaints that the landmark 44-year-old law hinders drilling, logging and other activities. At simultaneous hearings Wednesday, House and Senate committees considered bills to revise the law and limit lengthy and costly litigation associated with it. The bills come as a federal court lifted federal protections for gray wolves in Wyoming and the Trump administration moved to lift protections for grizzly bears in and near Yellowstone National Park. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke also is reviewing federal efforts to conserve the imperiled sage grouse in 11 Western states. House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Rob Bishop said the bills would curb excessive litigation and allow officials to focus on actual species conservation. All too often, the endangered species law “has been misused to control land, block a host of economic activities important for jobs … proliferate costly litigation that drains taxpayer resources away from actual conservation efforts,” said Bishop, a Utah Republican. Arizona Rep. Raul Grijalva, the panel’s senior Democrat, said the law “does not need congressional meddling to work better. What it needs is congressional support.” Despite years of Republican efforts to pass bills weakening the species law and cut funding for agencies responsible for protecting and recovering imperiled American wildlife, “99 percent of listed species have continued to survive, and 90 percent are on schedule to meet their recovery goals,” Grijalva said. Environmental groups called the simultaneous hearings a “one-two punch” on threatened wildlife. “While nine out of ten Americans want to protect endangered species and their habitat, Congressional leaders are spending their time dismantling the ESA in favor of special interests,” said Jamie Rappaport Clark, president and CEO of Defenders of Wildlife. “Enactment of any of these bills will only hasten the disappearance of endangered and threatened species from our planet.” Five bills were being considered by the House panel, and a sixth bill was being heard in the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee. One of the bills would allow economic factors to be considered in some species-listing decisions, while another would cap attorneys’ fees in endangered species cases. Both the House and Senate would “delist” the gray wolf as a protected species in the western Great Lakes and Wyoming, with management turned over to state officials in Wyoming, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. The bills also block further judicial review of a 2011 decision by the Fish and Wildlife Service to remove federal protections for the wolves. Gray wolves were once hunted to the brink of extinction in most of the country, but now number over 5,500 in the lower 48 states, including nearly 3,800 in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan and nearly 400 in Wyoming. Rep. Collin Peterson, D-Minn., said the current law prevents Midwest farmers from killing wolves even if they attack cattle or pets. “The states, not the federal government, are best equipped to manage their gray wolf populations by balancing safety, economic and species-management issues,” he said. Sen. John. Barrasso, R-Wyo., chairman of the Senate environment panel, said the bipartisan Senate bill would enhance recreational hunting and sport fishing, ensure common-sense environmental regulation and protect wildlife and wildlife habitat. The bill reauthorizes several environmental programs, promotes public target ranges for recreational shooting and allows fishermen to continue using lead tackle, among other provisions. Gregory Sheehan, acting director of the Fish and Wildlife Service, said the Trump administration generally supports the House bills, with “some technical modifications.” His agency plays a key role in preventing extinctions and aiding recovery, Sheehan said, “but states and the people on the ground who have long been stewards of the land are in the best position to be the primary caretakers of species over the long-term.”
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AP Explains: Unrest as Venezuelan constitution rewrite nears

AP Explains: Unrest as Venezuelan constitution rewrite nears

As Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s plan to rewrite the troubled nation’s constitution approaches, the opposition is vowing to intensify near-daily demonstrations to voice dissent. Nearly 7.2 million Venezuelans voted in a symbolic referendum Sunday rejecting Maduro’s push for the July 30 election of a special assembly that could reshape the country’s government and consolidate his power. HOW DID VENEZUELA’S TURMOIL BEGIN? The oil-rich nation was once one of Latin America’s most prosperous…
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Cooper vetoes bill for electronic notices in urban county

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper vetoed legislation Monday that would have allowed local governments and attorneys in an urban county to stop posting legal notices in newspapers and put them on government websites instead. The legal notice changes would have applied only to Guilford County, the home of a state senator who for years has led the push for county and municipal governing boards statewide to have the option. Opponents of the current measure, approved in the final days of the General Assembly session, consider it a financial attack on Guilford-area newspapers, which generate advertising revenues from the notices. The Democratic governor said the measure marked another instance of the Republican-controlled legislature using “levers of big government to attack important institutions in our state who may disagree with them from time to time.” “Unfortunately, this legislation is another example of that misguided philosophy meant to specifically threaten and harm the media,” Cooper said in his written veto message. “Legislation that enacts retribution on the media threatens a free and open press, which is fundamental to our democracy.” The measure also could make it harder for newspapers to keep carriers identified as independent contractors, rather than actual employees subject to workers’ compensation benefits, when the designation is formally challenged. Had Guilford County agreed to the pilot program, the law would have created a county website where attorneys could post notices like foreclosures and estate sales for a fee, instead of buying newspaper ad space. Half of the government revenue would have gone to higher teacher salaries in Guilford County. Local governments also could have avoided newspaper filings by agreeing to post public hearing and meeting notices on their own websites. Sen. Trudy Wade, a Guilford County Republican and a top proponent of electronic notices, blasted Cooper for the veto, which “makes it clear his No. 1 priority is brown-nosing those who cover him.” Cooper’s veto, Wade said in a release, is “to the detriment of the newspaper employees being denied workers compensation coverage, the taxpayers currently being forced to subsidize newspapers, the citizens who want to access public information for free and the public school teachers he’s denying raises to.” The veto is Cooper’s eighth since taking office and stands a chance of getting upheld in an override vote. The House passed the bill 60-53 — well short of a veto-proof majority, with more than a dozen Republicans voting no. The General Assembly reconvenes for an override session Aug. 3. Supporters of broad electronic notice legislation argue it would save taxpayers money, but press groups have been worried it could make it hard for small newspapers to survive and for rural residents with poor internet service to access information. North Carolina Press Association attorney John Bussian said in a phone interview the group “wholeheartedly supports the veto … for all the reasons North Carolina newspapers have long argued — that the bill would seriously damage the public’s right to know.” Cooper said he did support a portion of the bill addressing workers’ compensation coverage for prisoners who produce goods and asked lawmakers to pass a separate bill containing the provision. Legislators overrode Cooper’s first five votes, while two more issued after the legislature adjourned June 30 have yet to be reconsidered. More than 80 bills sat on Cooper’s desk as of Monday. He has until July 30 to sign them, veto them or let them become law without his signature.
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Marijuana deal calls for up to 20 percent tax on pot sales

State House and Senate negotiators reached an agreement Monday on a revamped version of Massachusetts’ voter-approved marijuana law that would allow retail pot sales to be taxed at a maximum 20 percent rate. The deal was struck following closed-door negotiations by a six-member conference committee tasked with reconciling sharply different approaches to marijuana regulation and taxation. The talks had dragged on well past the June 30 deadline legislative leaders originally set for crafting a co…
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Marijuana deal calls for up to 20 percent tax on pot sales

State House and Senate negotiators reached an agreement Monday on a revamped version of Massachusetts’ voter-approved marijuana law that would allow retail pot sales to be taxed at a maximum 20 percent rate. The deal was struck following closed-door negotiations by a six-member conference committee tasked with reconciling sharply different approaches to marijuana regulation and taxation. The talks had dragged on well past the June 30 deadline legislative leaders originally set for crafting a co…
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The Leading Music Law Schools of 2017

Behind the success of every artist — from the industry mainstays and chart-toppers to rising stars — is a lawyer fielding the deals and disputes that are a constant part of today’s ever-evolving music business. With the rise of new business models and the growing dependence on brand licensing and streaming, attorneys are more important than ever. The scope of their legal expertise is also wider, moving beyond issues of contract law to questions of intellectual property in the digital age a…
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Florida's fishing girls of Instagram

Florida’s fishing girls of Instagram

Florida fisherwomen can reel in the big ones just like their male counterparts. And they’re taking to social media to prove it. Several female South Florida anglers share their catches of the day on social-media networks, particularly Instagram, attracting thousands of followers. Don’t be fooled by their slim bodies and skinny arms. These girls can fight blue marlin, swordfish, mahi, tuna, sailfish and more. “A lot of people are really doubtful. You definitely have to prove yourself. You …
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Baby eel lottery is a go in Maine, where elver fishing pays

Maine is implementing a new lottery system for licenses to fish for baby eels, which are worth more than $1,000 per pound on the worldwide sushi market. Baby eels, called elvers, are a major fishery in Maine, where fishermen sell them to dealers so they can be sent to Asian aquaculture companies to be raised to maturity and used as food. But industry members and lawmakers have said the fishery needs a way to bring new people into the business because many elver fishermen are nearing retirement …
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Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine tours Florida amid rumors of gubernatorial bid

Tags: Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine, miami beach, florida governor, Image…
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Historical Vignettes: Smokehouse Sally, popular restaurateur, Part 1

  Many people through the years have moved to Martin County to retire and enjoy a more leisurely lifestyle. There are some, however, like Sally and Bill Peters who relocated to the little community to establish a profitable business in a small friendly town. ] Actually the couple had owned and operated the popular Mrs. Peters Smoked Fish, an eatery in Miami for decades, but  decided to relocate to Rio, Florida in 1958. Bill’s wife, known as “Smokehouse Sally,” would be the driving force i…
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150 pounds of cocaine found aboard boat in Miami

150 pounds of cocaine found aboard boat in Miami

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US Customs snags major drug bust on Nassau Boat in Miami

Miami, Florida, July 12th 2017: Five people have been arrested in Miami after 150 pounds (68 kilos) of cocaine were found on a fishing boat that was stopped near the Miami River on Tuesday. The find is said to have a street value of $2,720,000.00. U.S. Customs and Border Protection boarded the boat, Wes Win, one of two boats coming from Nassau. During a normal inspection and search, the officers found 70 packages of cocaine in blue bundled boxes that were behind a stack of Junkanoo Punch soda c…
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Japan protests armed N. Korean boat in Tokyo economic zone

Japan has protested to North Korea after a Japanese patrol vessel spotted an armed boat believed to be from there allegedly fishing illegally, an official said Thursday. The crew pointed a gun at the Japanese fisheries vessel, forcing it to withdraw, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told a news conference. The incident happened last Friday about 500 kilometers (310 miles) west of Japan’s northern coast in an area Tokyo claims as its exclusive economic zone, Suga said. Suga said that Japan…
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150 pounds of cocaine seized from fishing boat along Miami River

Four crew members of a fishing vessel were apprehended Tuesday in Miami after U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials seized 150 pounds of cocaine during a routine inspection, authorities said. The boat, named the Wes Win, was one of two arriving from Nassau that was flagged for a regular inspection at the RMK Merrill-Stevens Shipyard at 881 NW 13th Avenue, said Customs and Border Protection spokesman Keith Smith. When officers boarded the boat, they found about 70 blue bundles of the drug…
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East Alabama men arrested for illegal lobster fishing of FL Keys

MARATHON, FL (WTVM) – A group of fishermen, some of them fathers and sons from Eufaula and Phenix City, have been arrested for an illegal head start on the lobster season. That’s according to officers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The suspects are accused of several crimes, including the illegal spearing of 320 lobster in Marathon, Florida. The 2-day lobster sport season in the Florida Keys starts July 26 and the limit is 6 lobster per person per da…
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