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Miami Boat Show NMMA Innovation Award Winners Announced for 2017

Miami Boat Show NMMA Innovation Award Winners Announced for 2017

The Miami Boat Show’s 2017 NMMA Innovation Award winners spanned 23 categories of competition. Twenty-one new products from boat-maintenance tools to engine innovations and boats claimed top awards for innovation from the National Marine Manufacturers Association and Boating Writers International during the 2017 Miami International Boat Show that ended Feb. 20. This year’s judges — a committee of eight BWI members — reviewed 63 products across 23 categories in the days leading up to the s…
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Scallop fishing areas closing to curb over-exploitation

Maine fishing regulators are temporarily closing several scallop fishing areas beginning this weekend to prevent the valuable shellfish from over-harvest. WCSH-TV reports (http://on.wcsh6.com/2lMNZjV ) the state Department of Marine Resources closures take effect on Sunday for the Damariscotta River in Lincoln County, North Haven and mid-Penobscot Bay. The closures will also take place in the Lower Blue Hill Bay and Jericho Bay area, and the Chandler Bay and Head Harbor area. The closures are t…
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As Dean, Trump's Labor Sec'y Pick Put Law School On the Map

As Dean, Trump’s Labor Sec’y Pick Put Law School On the Map

Next Article: Microsoft, Stripe Urge Federal Bank Regulators to Go Cautiously on Cyber Regs…
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Judge blocks California law on posting actors’ ages

A California law that restricts a popular Hollywood website from posting actors’ ages raises First Amendment concerns and does not appear likely to combat age discrimination in the entertainment industry in any meaningful way, a federal judge said Wednesday. U.S. District Court Judge Vince Chhabria granted IMDb.com’s request to block AB 1687 while the website’s lawsuit challenging it winds through the courts. Chhabria said the law prevented IMDb from publishing factual information on its public…
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One-time Hurricanes QB hopeful Kevin Olsen arrested and charged with rape

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Trump Immigration Crackdown Sparks Fear Among Even Legal Miami Valley Immigrants

News this week of sweeping Trump administration changes to United States immigration-enforcement policies is sparking a wave of fear among both legal immigrants and immigrants in the Miami Valley illegally, advocates say. The immigration crackdown means millions of people living in the country illegally could face deportation.   Credit Jonathan Platt / WYSO The Associated Press reports a Homeland Security memo indicates any undocumented immigrant who is charged, or even suspected of a crime, …
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Lisa Marie Presley to pay estranged husband’s legal fees

Lisa Marie Presley will not have to pay spousal support to her estranged husband while they fight over her assets, but she will have to pay some of his attorney’s fees, a judge ruled Wednesday. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Patrick Cathcart ordered Presley to pay $50,000 to the lawyer representing her estranged husband, Michael Lockwood. It comes days after Presley filed court documents stating she is deeply in debt and their 8-year-old twin daughters are subject to a child welfare case. The order does not affect the couple’s children, who are in the care of Presley’s mother, Priscilla. No details about the children were discussed in court. A trial in children’s court is scheduled for March. Presley, 49, is the only child of Elvis Presley and ex-wife of both Michael Jackson and Nicolas Cage. Lockwood is challenging the validity of an agreement he signed after marrying Presley in 2006 that would govern how much he is entitled to in a divorce. He had been seeking $40,000 a month in spousal support, but Cathcart said the unemployed musician would have to wait until after a trial on the agreement. Lockwood’s attorney, Jeff Sturman, argued that Presley had not proven she was deeply in debt and had received an average of $5.6 million in payouts from her father’s estate, according to her most recent tax returns. Presley’s lawyer, Mark Gross, contended that Presley has not paid $1 million in taxes she owed last year, is deeply in debt on a property in England and didn’t receive the big payout from the estate last year that she has received in previous years. Lockwood “has no money with which to live,” Sturman argued. Leaving him without money from Presley “just leaves Mr. Lockwood in this continuing state of poverty.” Lockwood gave up his career and worked for Presley before their breakup, according to court documents. Gross contended that Lockwood hasn’t been looking for work and should apply to be a music teacher or work at Guitar Center. Presley and Lockwood both appeared in a downtown Los Angeles courtroom for Wednesday’s hearing but did not appear to speak to each other. They separated in June after 10 years of marriage. Their breakup has grown messy in recent weeks, with Presley disclosing her money trouble. She also said in court filings that she has been living with her adult daughter and has been in a treatment facility for undisclosed reasons since moving from Tennessee to California last year. She contends the children’s court proceeding was initiated after she discovered photos and “disturbing” video on her husband’s computer. Sturman has said the allegations are “highly sensational” and inaccurate.” Priscilla Presley tried to allay fans’ concerns about the legal issues and well-being of the twins in a Facebook post Sunday. “There is lots of confusion, commotion and concern from all the talk circulating,” she wrote. “Let me put this to rest … the girls have not been in foster care and never will be. The girls have been with me and will be until all this is sorted out.”
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MIAMI 2017: Size and presence of center consoles grow

MIAMI 2017: Size and presence of center consoles grow

Boston Whaler president Nick Stickler (right) introduces the new 380 Outrage center console Friday at the Miami International Boat Show. Also shown are vice president of sales, marketing and customer service Jeff Vaughn (center) and design manager Charlie Foss. MIAMI — After a couple days of pounding the docks at the Miami International Boat Show, it’s easy to see that center consoles will continue to get bigger during the next two to three years, with more builders joining the 50-foot club…
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Lawmaker: Protect trapping, hunting, fishing in constitution

A Republican lawmaker wants voters to add protections for trapping, hunting and fishing to the Montana constitution. The Helena Independent-Record reports (bit.ly/2l3kSrO) state Sen. Jennifer Fielder of Thompson Falls says her proposal would fend off any attempts by opponents of hunting or trapping to ban the practices. The Senate Fish and Game Committee discussed the measure Thursday. It calls for a statewide referendum on the proposed amendment. An amendment approved by voters in 2004 is gene…
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Already 18? Oregon county says don't worry about tobacco law

Already 18? Oregon county says don’t worry about tobacco law

Commissioners in an Oregon county say a proposed ordinance to increase the legal age for using and buying tobacco products from 18 to 21 should include a clause to exempt users who have already turned 18. “Eighteen-year-olds who are already addicted shouldn’t have to quit cold turkey,” Lane County Commissioner Jay Bozievich said at Tuesday’s public hearing on the issue. “Let’s be fair to those who are already addicted at a legal age, rather than making their addiction illegal.&qu…
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Already 18? Lane officials say don’t worry about tobacco law

Commissioners in an Oregon county say a proposed ordinance to increase the legal age for using and buying tobacco products from 18 to 21 should include a clause to exempt users who have already turned 18. “Eighteen-year-olds who are already addicted shouldn’t have to quit cold turkey,” Lane County Commissioner Jay Bozievich said at Tuesday’s public hearing on the issue. “Let’s be fair to those who are already addicted at a legal age, rather than making their addiction illegal.&qu…
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Trump administration ushers in changes to Obama health law

The Trump administration took steps Wednesday intended to calm jittery insurance companies and make tax compliance with former President Barack Obama’s health law less burdensome for some people. But the changes could lead to policies with higher annual deductibles, according to the administration’s own proposal. That seems to undercut President Donald Trump’s assurance in a recent Washington Post interview that his plan would mean “lower numbers, much lower deductibles.” The moves announced separately by the Health and Human Services Department and the IRS don’t amount to sweeping changes to the Affordable Care Act. That would fall to Congress, where Republicans are struggling to reach consensus over how to deliver on their promise to repeal and replace the health law. House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., is expected to present elements of a plan to GOP lawmakers Thursday morning. But the administration actions do signal a change in direction. Recently confirmed HHS Secretary Tom Price called them “initial steps in advance of a broader effort to reverse the harmful effects of Obamacare.” Premiums are up sharply this year, while many communities were left with just one insurer. For consumers, the proposed HHS rules mean tighter scrutiny of anyone trying to sign up for coverage outside of open enrollment by claiming a “special enrollment period” due to a change in life circumstances such as the birth of a child, marriage, or the loss of job-based insurance. Also, sign-up season will be 45 days, shortened from three months currently. For insurers, the curbs on special enrollments are a big item. The industry claimed that some consumers were gaming the system by signing up when they needed expensive treatments, only to drop out later. Insurers would also gain more flexibility to design low-premium plans tailored to younger people. But that flexibility could lead to higher deductibles, according to HHS. “The proposed change … could reduce the value of coverage for consumers,” the administration proposal said. “However, in the longer run, providing (insurers) with additional flexibility could help stabilize premiums.” Larry Levitt of the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation said “this would allow insurers to offer plans with higher deductibles, which seems counter to President’s Trump promise to lower deductibles.” A deductible is the annual amount consumers pay for medical care before their insurance kicks in. Democrats said the HHS changes would undermine consumer protections and make more people uninsured. Some called the move “sabotage.” Separately, the IRS said it’s backing off from a tighter approach to enforcement that was in the works for this tax-filing season. The IRS said that’s in line with Trump’s executive order directing agencies to ease requirements of the health law. Under the law, people are required to have health coverage or risk fines from the IRS — an unpopular provision. That underlying requirement remains on the books, and taxpayers are still legally obligated to comply, the IRS said. But the agency is changing its approach to enforcement. Originally, the IRS had planned to start rejecting returns this year if a taxpayer failed to indicate whether he or she had coverage. Now the IRS says it will keep processing such returns, as it has in the past. Administration officials said the HHS rules will help to stabilize the individual health insurance market for next year. That could buy time for Congress to make bigger changes. The industry group America’s Health Insurance Plans commended the administration, but said more is needed. In particular, insurers want Trump and Congress to remove a legal cloud over billions of dollars in subsidies that the companies are obligated to pay to cover deductibles and copayments for low-income people. It remained unclear if insurers would be swayed. Only Tuesday, Humana announced it will not participate in next year in the government-run marketplaces, where insurer exits have already diminished consumer choice. “I don’t necessarily think these changes are enough to alter insurers’ decision-making about staying in the markets,” said Caroline Pearson of the consulting firm Avalere Health. Pearson said consumer reviews may also be mixed. Healthy people may appreciate more affordable premiums. But people with health problems could see an erosion in coverage. Separately, a government report Wednesday said the nation’s problem with rising health care spending is back and here to stay, regardless of what happens to the Obama health law. Nonpartisan experts at HHS said health care spending will claim a growing share of national resources for the foreseeable future. Health care will grow at an annual average of 5.6 percent from 2016-2025, outpacing expected economic growth. Now $3.5 trillion, the nation’s health care tab will increase to nearly $5.5 trillion in 2025, accounting for about one-fifth of the economy. The unwelcome trend is due to fundamentals such as rising prices for treatments and services, as well as an aging population.
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Archbishop On Churches Taking In Immigrants: ‘Sanctuary’s Not Going To Solve Problem’

Follow CBSMIAMI.COM: Facebook | Twitter MIAMI (CBSMiami) – The head of the Archdiocese of Miami, Archbishop Thomas Wenski, says there’s not much legal protection a church can provide for an illegal immigrant seeking sanctuary from immigration officials, which is what a woman is doing in Denver. Jeanette Vizguerra has been taking refuge at Denver’s First Unitarian Church to avoid being deported. “Sanctuary is a concept that arrived in the Middle Ages, in Catholic Europe in…
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Liberians accuse 2 boats of illegal fishing, seek $1 million

Liberians accuse 2 boats of illegal fishing, seek $1 million

Liberian authorities say they’ve impounded two foreign fishing vessels and are seeking $1 million in compensation. Defense Minister Brownie Samukai said Friday that one of the boats was a Chinese vessel that paid just $700 for a permit to import 40 tons of fish. However, he told state radio that officials found that the permit was being used for multiple vessels, carrying a total of 130 tons of fish. The other vessel is Spanish-owned but Senegalese-flagged. Liberian authorities are citing 25 vi…
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Mitigation priorities in the hands of fish and game

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game will spent time this spring planning and implementing mitigation measures for the Black Canyon Reservoir and Lower Payette River. In November 2016, the IDFG received funds from the 2013 mitigation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. Mitigation priorities in the hands of fish and game By DIANA BAIRD newsroom@messenger-index.com The Miami County Republic | 0 comments The mitigation was the result of a problem that occurred in 2013 when the BOR drew wate…
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Bill would prohibit fish farming in US Great Lakes waters

A member of Congress is sponsoring a bill to prohibit fish farming in waters of the Great Lakes within the United States. Democratic Rep. Dan Kildee of Michigan says poorly operated aquaculture facilities can increase pollution, destroy fish habitat, spread disease and introduce non-native species. Michigan has received proposals for net-like commercial fishing enclosures in the Great Lakes. There are none in U.S. Great Lakes waters at present, although Canada has allowed them. Kildee’s bill al…
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Miami Boat Show 2017 New Boats and Product Preview

Miami’s famed boat show — in its 76th year — opens Thursday, Feb. 15 at Miami Marine Stadium. This is the show’s second year at the on-water Virginia Key location. Miami Boat Show organizers predict that more than 100,000 boating enthusiasts from around the world will descend on the iconic Miami Marine Stadium on Rickenbacker Causeway for the event’s 76th appearance — Thursday, Feb. 15 through Monday, February 20 (President’s Day). The boat show is just in its second year at that locatio…
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Ohio bill would allow protective orders for dating violence

Ohio bill would allow protective orders for dating violence

A bipartisan bill in the Ohio House would allow victims of dating violence to seek a protective order against an alleged perpetrator. The bill would update current law which only recognizes violence between spouses, family members, those living together or family members for the purpose of seeking a protective order. Backers say Ohio and Georgia are the only states that don’t cover victims of dating violence under domestic violence laws. The proposal would give victims of dating violence access…
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When her friend’s son stopped by, she had no idea she’d end up fighting for her life

Alice Snodgrass was chatting with her longtime friend Nicki Alexopoulos in the living room when she saw a shadow outside her friend’s Brookside home. “That’s Patrick,” Alexopoulos said quietly as her 38-year-old son approached the door. When Patrick Alexopoulos entered the foyer that afternoon last October, Snodgrass saw her vivacious friend’s demeanor shift. Nicki became subdued and alarmed. Patrick wanted $25,000, and he wanted it now. Nicki, sitting quietly with her hands in her la…
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Violence spreads in Paris suburbs; 17 more arrests

A gang of masked rioters set more than a dozen vehicles ablaze in a car dealership as violence spread to more suburban Paris towns over the alleged rape of a young black man with a police baton, authorities said Wednesday. Police made 17 arrests, according to the prefecture of the Saint-Seine-Denis region, a working class region northeast of Paris with a large minority population. The violence, which has now spread to at least five towns, erupted after a 22-year-old man was allegedly sodomized …
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The Latest: Trump: No tolerance for violence against police

The Latest on President Donald Trump (all times EST): 8:40 p.m. The White House says President Donald Trump has written Chinese President Xi Jinping (shee jihn-peeng) to wish the “Chinese people a happy Lantern Festival and prosperous Year of the Rooster.” The White House says Trump wrote Xi to thank him for a congratulatory letter and to express his hopes of developing “a constructive relationship that benefits both the United States and China.” Before taking office, Trump …
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Brazilian governor wants more army troops to quell violence

A Brazilian governor said Wednesday that he needs more soldiers to help cope with a police crisis that has led to a wave of violence and at least 80 deaths in his southeastern state. Cesar Colnago, acting governor of Espirito Santo, told reporters that he would ask the federal government for more troops, saying the 1,000 soldiers already sent were not enough to stem the tide of violence. The killings in the state capital of Vitoria and other cities erupted as friends and family of military poli…
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Cooper seeks temporary block of Cabinet confirmation law

Cooper seeks temporary block of Cabinet confirmation law

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper is returning to court to try to prevent his Cabinet secretaries from being subjected to confirmation hearings starting this week that he argues are unconstitutional. Cooper’s outside lawyers asked a three-judge panel late Monday to temporarily block enforcement of the law directing his department heads be subject to the “advice and consent” of a majority of senators. Cooper spokesman Ford Porter said the hearing on the motion was expected Tuesday, a day …
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SPLC, advocates urge Miami-Dade to resist Trump over immigration enforcement

The SPLC and a broad coalition of advocates and legal scholars today urged Florida’s Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners to uphold a …
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ACLU: Miami-Dade mayor “duped” by President Trump on immigration detentions

Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez misread the law and the risk of losing federal aid when he tried to appease President Donald Trump by ordering local jails to detain inmates sought by immigration agents, a coalition of liberal advocacy groups wrote in a letter to county commissioners on Monday. “The County should not give in to President Trump’s bluster,” read the 10-page letter signed by local leaders of the American Civil Liberties Union, Service Employees International Union, Southern P…
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ACLU On Miami-Dade Mayor’s Immigration Decision: ‘County Is Going To Be Sued’

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Previously, Miami-Dade County held arrested immigrants if the feds asked, but only if they were charged with a serious, violent offense. People have taken to the streets protesting Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez’s decision to detain any immigrant who comes into the county jail system if immigration asks, even those charged with petty offenses. Now, the American Civil Liberties Union is urging citizens to call their county commissioners and lobby them to overturn the …
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Tennessee online sales tax rule draws legal challenge

Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday that the state’s move to require all major online vendors to collect sales taxes on purchases made in Tennessee has drawn a legal challenge. Under current federal law, online retailers can only be required to collect sales taxes if they have a physical presence in the state such as a store or office there. Consumers ordering from out-of-state retailers are technically required to pay the tax to the state Revenue Department, but few do. Haslam’s tax rule seeks to ext…
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Trump's immigration order faces mounting legal questions

Trump’s immigration order faces mounting legal questions

The legal fight over President Donald Trump’s ban on refugees is likely to turn on questions of a president’s authority to control America’s borders and on whether the new immigration policy unconstitutionally discriminates against Muslims. Civil liberties advocates have challenged the order, which temporarily suspends immigration from seven countries and the United States’ broader refugee program. It has drawn nationwide protests since the order was issued on Friday. Federal judges in New York…
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Universities urging international students, faculty to avoid…

CORAL GABLES, Fla. – University of Miami law student Niki Namezi was one of hundreds of students who packed into a lecture hall on Monday to listen to Muneer Ahamd, a Yale professor, speak about President Donald Trump’s executive order that calls for a travel ban directed at seven Muslim-majority nations. The order has caused confusion as some remain unclear as to how it affects U.S. green card holders.  Officials have said that green card holders who are returning to the U.S. wil…
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After Roof trial, SC addressing faith, violence intersection

After Roof trial, SC addressing faith, violence intersection

The federal trial of the South Carolina man who slaughtered nine Bible study participants has come and gone, with Dylann Roof’s death sentence assuring he will spend the rest of his limited days in custody. But the June 2015 shootings at Emanuel AME continue to prompt a conversation about the uneasy intersection of faith and gun violence, as thousands of worshippers around South Carolina gather this weekend to memorialize crime victims and call for reform. It isn’t just the church slaughter tha…
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Young survivors: A WLRN project on the unspoken trauma of gun violence

For Aaron Willis, a Booker T. Washington High student partially paralyzed by an unknown shooter in Wynwood, putting his life back together has proven a grueling emotional challenge — both for him and his family. Willis is one of hundreds of young people in Miami-Dade County who have survived bullet wounds, an experience that leaves psychological scars that have not been well-researched. In a special projected Young Survivors: The Unspoken Trauma of Gun Violence, WLRN-Miami Herald News chronic…
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Rimon Law Opens Office in Miami With Addition of Florida Partners

Rimon Law Opens Office in Miami With Addition of Florida Partners

The two name partners of Alvarez Gonzalez, a one-year-old international litigation and white-collar defense law firm, have joined Rimon Law to …
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Tips And No Tricks

5 Keys to a Happy Marriage

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