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Miami passes resolution condemning hate speech, violence against Muslims

Miami passes resolution condemning hate speech, violence against Muslims

Miami passes resolution condemning hate speech, violence against Muslims. 0. Sponsored by Revcontent. You May Also Like. This Meal Kit Service …
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Miami resolution condemns anti-Muslim hate speech, violence

(WPLG) Nezar Hamze stood in front of the Miami Commission last week, holding back tears before thanking officials for placing a resolution condemning hate speech and violence against Muslims on the agenda. Hamze looked down, cleared his voice and began to speak. “Wanted to thank you for your courage commissioner,” Hamze, operations director with the Council of American-Islamic Relations, and Broward Sheriff’s Office deputy. “As a father I appreciate your courage. It&#821…
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Hawaii lawmakers hold public meeting on foreign fishermen

Hawaii lawmakers hold public meeting on foreign fishermen

A woman who worked as an observer on fishing boats that docked in Honolulu described for Hawaii lawmakers what it was like without toilets, showers or hot water. “You have a cold water deck hose as a shower…the water tastes like iron,” said Ashley Watts, a former observer for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Watts’ comments to lawmakers at the state Capitol Wednesday followed an Associated Press investigation that found some fishermen have been confined to vessels for years. A federal loophole allows the foreign men to work but exempts them from most basic labor protections. Many foreign fishermen have to stay on the boats because they are not legally allowed to enter the United States. “It’s hard to sleep, because every day we don’t do something is another night that some folks are suffering,” state Rep. Kaniela Ing said. “It’s very frustrating to just hear people just kind of punt or say maybe over time we can find a solution.” Ing and other lawmakers pressed representatives from the fishing industry and government agencies about what can be done to increase oversight and improve conditions in the industry. Ing asked Jim Cook, board member of the Hawaii Longline Association, whether fishing boat captains could provide copies of contracts between fishermen and boat captains to the state, and Cook said he believed that would be possible. The Hawaii Longline Association, which represents fishing boat owners, created a universal crew contract that will be required on any boat wanting to sell fish in the state’s seafood auction. The group began distributing the contract to boat captains on Oct. 1, and John Kaneko, program manager for Hawaii Seafood Council, estimated less than 60 boat owners have returned the contract so far. Some at the meeting were skeptical that the new industry contract would make a difference, in part because it relies on the industry policing itself, which they say hasn’t worked. “I think the universal contract is a good first step, but it’s far from sufficient,” Ing said. He asked Kaneko if the industry is open to making changes that could strengthen the contract. “I appreciate your contribution, because we’re trying to get something in place quickly,” Kaneko said. “We accept all the criticisms and the contributions.” Alton Miyasaka, a manager in the state Division of Aquatic Resources, said staff used to go out and inspect the boats when there were fewer vessels, but “we don’t have the necessary staff to go out to the boats regularly.” Before the meeting, a group of Hawaii residents and activists rallied outside the state Capitol to call for better conditions for fishermen, demanding an end to what they call unacceptable living and working conditions. “There are a lot of ideas for reform,” said Khara Jabola, chapter coordinator for af3irm Hawaii, an organization that focuses on human trafficking. “At a minimum, there needs to be a rejection of the industry’s proposal for self-regulation.” Over six months, The Associated Press obtained confidential contracts, reviewed dozens of business records and interviewed boat owners, brokers and more than 50 fishermen in Hawaii, Indonesia and San Francisco. The investigation found men living in squalor on some boats, forced to use buckets instead of toilets, suffering running sores from bed bugs and sometimes lacking sufficient food. It also revealed instances of human trafficking. The report was part of the AP’s ongoing global look at labor abuses in the fishing industry, stretching from Southeast Asia to America’s own waters. Last year, the AP reported on fishermen locked in a cage and others buried under fake names on the remote Indonesian island village of Benjina. Their catch was traced to the United States, leading to more than 2,000 slaves being freed. Federal law requires that U.S. citizens make up 75 percent of the crew on most commercial fishing vessels in America. The fleet in Hawaii has an exemption carved out years ago, largely by lawmakers no longer in office.
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Hawaii lawmakers hold public meeting on foreign fishermen

Hawaii lawmakers held a meeting to discuss conditions in the Hawaii longline fishing fleet and heard from an observer who described what it’s like to live on the boats. “The worst conditions would be no toilet, no shower, no hot water,” said Ashley Watts, a former observer for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, who spent weeks at sea with various boats over seven years at the federal agency. “You have a cold water deck hose as a shower…the water tastes like iron.” The meeting on Wednesday followed an Associated Press investigation that found some fishermen have been confined to vessels for years. A federal loophole allows the foreign men to work but exempts them from most basic labor protections. Many foreign fishermen have to stay on the boats because they are not legally allowed to enter the United States. “It’s hard to sleep, because every day we don’t do something is another night that some folks are suffering,” state Rep. Kaniela Ing said. “It’s very frustrating to just hear people just kind of punt or say maybe over time we can find a solution.” Ing and other lawmakers pressed representatives from the fishing industry and government agencies about what can be done to increase oversight and improve conditions in the industry. Ing asked Jim Cook, board member of the Hawaii Longline Association, whether fishing boat captains could provide copies of contracts between fishermen and boat captains to the state, and Cook said he believed that would be possible. The Hawaii Longline Association, which represents fishing boat owners, created a universal crew contract that will be required on any boat wanting to sell fish in the state’s seafood auction. The group began distributing the contract to boat captains on Oct. 1, and John Kaneko, program manager for Hawaii Seafood Council, estimated less than 60 boat owners have returned the contract so far. Some at the meeting were skeptical that the new industry contract would make a difference, in part because it relies on the industry policing itself, which they say hasn’t worked. “I think the universal contract is a good first step, but it’s far from sufficient,” Ing said. He asked Kaneko if the industry is open to making changes that could strengthen the contract. “I appreciate your contribution, because we’re trying to get something in place quickly,” Kaneko said. “We accept all the criticisms and the contributions.” Alton Miyasaka, a manager in the state Division of Aquatic Resources, said staff used to go out and inspect the boats when there were fewer vessels, but “we don’t have the necessary staff to go out to the boats regularly.” Before the meeting, Hawaii residents rallied outside the state Capitol to call for better conditions for fishermen, demanding an end to what they call unacceptable living and working conditions. “There are a lot of ideas for reform,” said Khara Jabola, chapter coordinator for af3irm Hawaii, an organization that focuses on human trafficking. “At a minimum, there needs to be a rejection of the industry’s proposal for self-regulation.” Over six months, The Associated Press obtained confidential contracts, reviewed dozens of business records and interviewed boat owners, brokers and more than 50 fishermen in Hawaii, Indonesia and San Francisco. The investigation found men living in squalor on some boats, forced to use buckets instead of toilets, suffering running sores from bed bugs and sometimes lacking sufficient food. It also revealed instances of human trafficking. The report was part of the AP’s ongoing global look at labor abuses in the fishing industry, stretching from Southeast Asia to America’s own waters. Last year, the AP reported on fishermen locked in a cage and others buried under fake names on the remote Indonesian island village of Benjina. Their catch was traced to the United States, leading to more than 2,000 slaves being freed. Federal law requires that U.S. citizens make up 75 percent of the crew on most commercial fishing vessels in America. The fleet in Hawaii has an exemption carved out years ago, largely by lawmakers no longer in office.
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The Latest: Hawaii citizens to protest fishing conditions

The Latest on a meeting to discuss conditions among the Hawaii longline fleet (all times local): 4:30 p.m. Hawaii lawmakers are pressing representatives from the fishing industry about what can be done to improve conditions for workers. A former boat observer said Wednesday she stayed on boats where there were no toilets or showers. State Rep. Kaniela Ing is asking the Hawaii Longline Association to provide contracts between fishermen and boat captains to the state. Jim Cook of the Hawaii Longl…
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Making other wishes come true

Making other wishes come true

Kimberly Barkerkbarker@miaminewsrecord.com WYANDOTTE— After being approved for Make-A-Wish, 8-year-old Rowdy Marlow was inspired to pay it forward and fulfill another child’s wish in Oklahoma. Rowdy parents are McKenzi and Chance Marlow of Wyandotte who also have a second son named Dax, 6. Both Rowdy and Dax attend Wyandotte Elementary. Rowdy has a rare form of muscular dystrophy called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). It’s a group of hereditary disorders that damage the ne…
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WAGS Miami's Astrid Bavaresco Goes ''Fishing'' for a Pro Baseball Player: ''I'm Ready to Watch …

WAGS Miami’s Astrid Bavaresco Goes ”Fishing” for a Pro Baseball Player: ”I’m Ready to Watch …

Batter up! WAGS Miami star Astrid Bavaresco is stepping up to the plate and hoping to hit a home run with a pro baseball player in this sneak peek from Sunday’s all-new episode. The swimsuit designer invites gal pals Claudia Sampedro, Hencha Voigt and Metisha Schaefer to join her for a Miami Marlins game, where she hopes to meet her new crush, A.J. Ramos. “I’m so ready to see some hot baseball players and watch them swing their bats!” she says. But since Claudia is alre…
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Trophy Snook Tips: How to Supersize

When fishing with lures at night, use chartreuse plugs such as the Bomber Long A or red-and-white lead-head jigs. During daylight hours, go with plugs such as Rapalas or MirrOlures, or artificial shrimp and crabs. “With live bait, fish the inlets during the early morning, before sunup, using croakers or scaled sardines,” Taylor says. “Anchor your boat up-current and fish back to the structure.” Legendary Miami-based sport-fishing captain Bouncer Smith needs little introduction. He does …
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Hawaii board denies rules changes for foreign fishermen

A Hawaii agency on Friday denied a petition to change state rules for commercial fishing licenses given to undocumented foreign fishermen. The petition sought changes in the licensing process that included certifying that the applicants understood what they were signing. Many of the foreign fishermen who work in the fleet do not read, write or understand English. With no legal standing on U.S. soil, the men are at the mercy of their American captains on American-flagged, American-owned vessels. Since they don’t have visas, they are not allowed to set foot on shore, so captains or their agents often prepare their licensing documents for them. The entire system, which contradicts other state and federal laws, operates with the blessing of high-ranking U.S. lawmakers and officials, an Associated Press investigation published in September found. A federal loophole allows the foreign men to work but exempts them from most basic labor protections, and some Hawaii residents are concerned that state rules offer little transparency and leave workers in the dark. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources spokesman Dan Dennison confirmed the board’s denial after its meeting on Friday. “It was predicted but it’s nevertheless disappointing,” said petitioner Kathryn Xian, who runs the nonprofit Pacific Alliance to Stop Slavery. “The DLNR has really shirked its responsibility in doing an easy fix,” Department officials had no immediate comment on the ruling, but Dennison said they would try to respond to requests later in the day. Over six months, the AP obtained confidential contracts, reviewed dozens of business records and interviewed boat owners, brokers and more than 50 fishermen in Hawaii, Indonesia and San Francisco. The investigation found men living in squalor on some boats, forced to use buckets instead of toilets, suffering running sores from bed bugs and sometimes lacking sufficient food. It also revealed instances of human trafficking. The report was part of the AP’s ongoing global look at labor abuses in the fishing industry, stretching from Southeast Asia to America’s own waters. The petition in Hawaii also requested that the person translating the documents be identified, that applicants provide documentation for their eligibility to enter the United States, and that vessels provide a list of all licensees under their command. In a document signed by Bruce Anderson, the administrator for the department that issues fishing licenses, a recommendation was made to deny the rule changes because the petition focused on labor issues that are outside the department’s jurisdiction. “We believe that a requirement that the applicant certify that he or she understands the application … is unnecessary,” the document said. Anderson said Thursday the agency is concerned about recent media reports regarding working conditions on fishing vessels but its responsibilities currently involve enforcement of existing rules. State and federal lawmakers promised to improve conditions for the foreign crews, and at least one company stopped buying fish from the boats immediately following the AP investigation. In a press release in September, Suzanne Case, chair the Department of Land and Natural Resources, said “we are certainly very concerned about any human rights violations that are reportedly occurring on the longline fishing fleet, and stand ready to assist in any way possible.” Lance Collins, a Honolulu attorney who argued in favor of the changes at Friday’s meeting, said in prepared testimony given to AP in advance that Anderson mischaracterizes the requested rule changes. “Upon reviewing the Petition, I myself am unable to find any ‘labor issue’ directly addressed in the proposed changes.” “The Pacific Alliance to Stop Slavery recognizes the importance of a vibrant economy and fully supports Hawaii’s fishing industry, but recognizes strongly that significant steps must be made to reform state licensing rules,” Xian said in her testimony. — Online State agency recommendation to deny petition: https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/F-1.pdf Petition: https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/F-1-Ex1.pdf
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Gunman Kills New York Anti-Violence Activist In Miami

Gunman Kills New York Anti-Violence Activist In Miami

Gunman Kills New York Anti-Violence Activist In Miami Photo by…
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Anti-Violence Activist Shot Dead In Miami

Lavon Walker, 30, an anti-violence activist, died at a hospital after being shot Sunday on a street corner in Miami Beach, CBS News reports. The incident took place near the popular Miami Beach street Ocean Drive right before 7 a.m. Three suspects were seen in a surveillance video speeding away from the scene of the shooting in a white Jeep Cherokee. Police are currently searching for them. According to the Miami Herald, Walker, the father of two, used to work with a Brooklyn, N.Y., advocacy …
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Baltic cod fishermen get better quotas than science wants

Baltic cod fishermen get better quotas than science wants

With Baltic cod drawing closer to the edge of commercial extinction, the European Union on Monday set tougher catch quotas for fishermen but stayed well above targets sought by scientists and environmentalists. After all-day negotiations in Luxembourg, the EU fisheries ministers agreed on a 56 percent quota cut for the western Baltic cod caught off Denmark and Germany, while scientists were pushing for the quota to be cut by about 90 percent. Officials said Denmark was pushing hard to safeguard…
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Seoul protests to Beijing over sinking of coast guard vessel

Seoul officials said Monday they’ve lodged a formal complaint with Beijing accusing Chinese fishing boats of ramming and sinking a South Korean coast guard vessel. The sinking happened on Friday when South Korean coast guard officers were trying to stop about 40 Chinese fishing boats from suspected illegal fishing off South Korea’s west coast. No causalities or injuries were reported, according to South Korea’s coast guard. One coast guard officer was on the South Korean vessel rammed by two Ch…
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One person detained in railroad line theft

One person detained in railroad line theft

Officer Joe Sheen flies down Keowee Street in his Dayton Police cruiser, makes a hard left turn and then throttles upward of 60 mph on East Third Street. He doesn’t say a word, dodging other drivers, before jamming the vehicle into park sideways in front of a house on Irwin Street. He bounds past the toys in the yard and the Halloween decorations on the front door and races up to a second-floor bedroom where an unconscious man is on the carpet. As heroin and its many substitutes course th…
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UNICEF calls for end to ‘dire’ situation in Aleppo

UNICEF’s representative in Syria called Saturday for an end to the violence that has beset northern Aleppo, causing “dire” humanitarian and psychological impacts on both sides of the divided city. U.N. agencies are on “standby” to deliver needed assistance, Hanaa Singer of the U.N.’s children agency told The Associated Press. The U.N. Security Council is expected to vote later Saturday on rival Syria resolutions sponsored by France and Russia. Both are virtually certain to b…
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Outdoor giant Bass Pro to acquire rival Cabela's for $4.5B

Outdoor giant Bass Pro to acquire rival Cabela’s for $4.5B

Outdoor gear giant Bass Pro is snapping up rival Cabela’s in a $4.5 billion deal announced Monday. Bass Pro is paying Cabela’s shareholders $65.50 cash per share, a 19 percent premium to Friday’s closing price. The companies valued the deal at $5.5 billion, which includes debt. The deal combines two companies known for their giant destination superstores. In 2006 Bass Pro Shops built a 450,000-square-foot distribution center in north Bibb County, the only one outside the company’s Springfield…
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NCAA faces seven more concussion-related class actions

NCAA faces seven more concussion-related class actions

INDIANAPOLIS (Legal Newsline) – Just as football season was preparing to kick off, the National Collegiate Athletic Association got hit with another round of lawsuits related to concussions student-athletes endured while engaging in collegiate sports. The seven class action suits, all filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana, bring the count against the NCAA to 22 pending concussion-related cases. The previous batch of class action cases were filed as late as May…
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Louisiana governor sues AG over anti-discrimination clause

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards sued the state attorney general Friday for rejecting contracts with an anti-discrimination clause that would protect LGBT people, language the governor ordered to be included in nearly all state contracts. “I believe he’s on the wrong side of the law and on the wrong side of history on this particular issue,” the Democratic governor said of Republican Attorney General Jeff Landry. Landry has refused to let state agencies hire outside lawyers if the agre…
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APNewsBreak: Attorneys general cast doubt on Utah land push

A new legal analysis from a group of Western attorneys general casts doubt on many of the arguments Utah has put forward in its push to gain control of millions of acres of federal land. The report, based on two years of work , doesn’t address every argument Utah has floated, but it points out decisions by the Supreme Court and other federal courts that could put Utah on shaky ground if it sues the U.S. government for control. The analysis was drafted by lawyers from seven Republican attorneys …
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Court upholds teacher's conviction for showing violent movie

Court upholds teacher’s conviction for showing violent movie

An Ohio appeals court has upheld the felony conviction of a former substitute teacher who was sentenced to three months in jail for showing a movie including graphic sex and violence to a high school class. Sheila Kearns previously apologized. She said she didn’t watch “The ABCs of Death” before showing it to her Spanish classes at Columbus’ East High School in April 2013. The movie has 26 chapters depicting grisly death, such as “E is for Exterminate.” Kearns was convicted …
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‘I’m trapped. … Oh my God, they’re coming!’ 911 calls reveal terror in Charlotte

Huddled in gridlocked cars as a roiling street protest bore upon them in the darkness, motorists pleaded with 911 operators for help in the week’s first wave of violence early Wednesday. Scenes of chaos were described in recordings released Monday by the city of Charlotte. Starting around 1:30 a.m., calls poured in to the emergency communications center as demonstrators angered by the shooting of Keith Lamont Scott flooded onto W.T. Harris Boulevard and Interstate 85. One of the first calls came from a woman in a Chrysler 300 stuck in traffic at Harris Boulevard and North Tryon Street when demonstrators began pounding on cars. “I’m trapped,” she said. “They’re all in the street … Oh my God, they’re coming!” She said no one appeared to have any weapons, but demonstrators were climbing on cars. About 50 vehicles were stopped around her, she said, and there was nowhere to go. Someone had placed traffic cones in the travel lanes ahead, she said, and when motorists got out to move them, demonstrators would put them back up to block traffic. “Now they’re trying to run over the cones and get home,” she said, and the call ended. A woman from Georgia traveling with her husband, two sons and their dog reported that a rock had shattered their windshield. “I’m still stuck in this,” she said. “I would like to get out of it before I pull over.” “I don’t want you to stop there, period. Just follow traffic and get out of the area.” He guided her to refuge in the IKEA parking lot near the highway. Next came a call from a trucker on the side of the highway reporting that people were looting trailers. “They are coming this way,” he said. “And I’m scared … Oh my God, there’s hundreds of them.” “I can’t move. There’s a whole mob of people, I’m not kidding. Yep, they’ve taken everything. They’ve got the whole road blocked.” From another trucker whose trailer was being looted: “I’m so scared … They’re just taking stuff and running with it. They’ve got the doors of the trailer open.” “Someone needs to get cops down here before these truckers start shooting some of these SOBs … Now they’ve started a fire … There’s just nowhere to go.” As word of the blockade spread by the news and social media, some northbound drivers on I-85 stopped short of the chaos, turned around and drove against traffic that was oncoming at speeds of up to 70 mph. facebook twitter email Share More Videos 0:35 Curious lemurs investigate camera Pause 0:21 Man caught on video sucker-punching woman 0:33 Video shows Houston transit police officer beating homeless man 0:34 Drone footage of 370-foot-tower imploding 2:22 Charlotte police release footage of Scott shooting 1:29 Video shows rattlesnakes fighting for dominance 2:24 Video shows fatal encounter between police, Keith Lamont Scott 2:31 Charlotte police include photo showing ‘weapon’ in shooting investigation 2:14 Third night of protests in Charlotte 0:36 Video shows woman shooting at home invaders, killing one 1:10 Dramatic video shows deadly shootout between rival gang members 0:15 Students kneel during National Anthem performance Share Video Video link: Select Embed code: Select facebook twitter email Fire on I-85 during Charlotte protests A fire was set on I-85 in the early-morning hours Wednesday during a protest following the officer-involved shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte.   A fire was set on I-85 in the early-morning hours Wednesday during a protest following the officer-involved shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte. According to a timeline from the city of Charlotte, a peaceful protest began in University City about 7 p.m. Tuesday. An hour later, the crowd grew more aggressive. At 8:30 p.m., the Civil Emergency Unit – what Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department calls its riot unit – was sent in “to de-escalate the situation and restore order,” the city said in a statement. But the friction grew – around 9 p.m., people began damaging police cars and throwing things at officers. Around 1:30 a.m., demonstrators began moving toward I-85. Traffic in both directions was shut down at about 1:45 a.m. and looting began. Another round of tear gas cleared the highway at 3 a.m. and it was reopened about 3:30 a.m. as a crowd descended on the Walmart in the 7700 block of North Tryon Street where they broke windows and looted the store. One demonstrator was arrested and 16 officers were hurt, none critically. No citizens were reported injured. facebook twitter email Share More Videos 0:35 Curious lemurs investigate camera Pause 0:21 Man caught on video sucker-punching woman 0:33 Video shows Houston transit police officer beating homeless man 0:34 Drone footage of 370-foot-tower imploding 2:22 Charlotte police release footage of Scott shooting 1:29 Video shows rattlesnakes fighting for dominance 2:24 Video shows fatal encounter between police, Keith Lamont Scott 2:31 Charlotte police include photo showing ‘weapon’ in shooting investigation 2:14 Third night of protests in Charlotte 0:36 Video shows woman shooting at home invaders, killing one 1:10 Dramatic video shows deadly shootout between rival gang members 0:15 Students kneel during National Anthem performance Share Video Video link: Select Embed code: Select facebook twitter email A timeline of the Charlotte police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott Protesters have taken to the streets of Charlotte following the shooting death of Keith Lamont Scott on Tuesday. Officials allege a black officer opened fire on Scott after he emerged from his car with a gun in the University City area. Family members say Scott, a disabled black man, was holding a book. Nicole L. Cvetnic McClatchy   Protesters have taken to the streets of Charlotte following the shooting death of Keith Lamont Scott on Tuesday. Officials allege a black officer opened fire on Scott after he emerged from his car with a gun in the University City area. Family members say Scott, a disabled black man, was holding a book.
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Study: As a species, humans inherit murderous tendencies

Evolution and genetics seem to have baked a certain amount of murder into humans as a species, but civilization has tamed some of the savage beast in us, according to a new study. Scientists calculated the rate at which more than 1,000 mammal species kill their own kind, and noticed how closely related species have similar rates of lethal violence. They essentially found that where a species is on evolutionary tree of life tells a lot about how violent the species is to its own kind. And we’re …
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