living in love and harmony

Sports

Miami Boat Show NMMA Innovation Award Winners Announced for 2017

Miami Boat Show NMMA Innovation Award Winners Announced for 2017

The Miami Boat Show’s 2017 NMMA Innovation Award winners spanned 23 categories of competition. Twenty-one new products from boat-maintenance tools to engine innovations and boats claimed top awards for innovation from the National Marine Manufacturers Association and Boating Writers International during the 2017 Miami International Boat Show that ended Feb. 20. This year’s judges — a committee of eight BWI members — reviewed 63 products across 23 categories in the days leading up to the s…
See all stories on this topic

Scallop fishing areas closing to curb over-exploitation

Maine fishing regulators are temporarily closing several scallop fishing areas beginning this weekend to prevent the valuable shellfish from over-harvest. WCSH-TV reports (http://on.wcsh6.com/2lMNZjV ) the state Department of Marine Resources closures take effect on Sunday for the Damariscotta River in Lincoln County, North Haven and mid-Penobscot Bay. The closures will also take place in the Lower Blue Hill Bay and Jericho Bay area, and the Chandler Bay and Head Harbor area. The closures are t…
See all stories on this topic

MIAMI 2017: Size and presence of center consoles grow

MIAMI 2017: Size and presence of center consoles grow

Boston Whaler president Nick Stickler (right) introduces the new 380 Outrage center console Friday at the Miami International Boat Show. Also shown are vice president of sales, marketing and customer service Jeff Vaughn (center) and design manager Charlie Foss. MIAMI — After a couple days of pounding the docks at the Miami International Boat Show, it’s easy to see that center consoles will continue to get bigger during the next two to three years, with more builders joining the 50-foot club…
See all stories on this topic

Lawmaker: Protect trapping, hunting, fishing in constitution

A Republican lawmaker wants voters to add protections for trapping, hunting and fishing to the Montana constitution. The Helena Independent-Record reports (bit.ly/2l3kSrO) state Sen. Jennifer Fielder of Thompson Falls says her proposal would fend off any attempts by opponents of hunting or trapping to ban the practices. The Senate Fish and Game Committee discussed the measure Thursday. It calls for a statewide referendum on the proposed amendment. An amendment approved by voters in 2004 is gene…
See all stories on this topic

Liberians accuse 2 boats of illegal fishing, seek $1 million

Liberians accuse 2 boats of illegal fishing, seek $1 million

Liberian authorities say they’ve impounded two foreign fishing vessels and are seeking $1 million in compensation. Defense Minister Brownie Samukai said Friday that one of the boats was a Chinese vessel that paid just $700 for a permit to import 40 tons of fish. However, he told state radio that officials found that the permit was being used for multiple vessels, carrying a total of 130 tons of fish. The other vessel is Spanish-owned but Senegalese-flagged. Liberian authorities are citing 25 vi…
See all stories on this topic

Mitigation priorities in the hands of fish and game

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game will spent time this spring planning and implementing mitigation measures for the Black Canyon Reservoir and Lower Payette River. In November 2016, the IDFG received funds from the 2013 mitigation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. Mitigation priorities in the hands of fish and game By DIANA BAIRD newsroom@messenger-index.com The Miami County Republic | 0 comments The mitigation was the result of a problem that occurred in 2013 when the BOR drew wate…
See all stories on this topic

Bill would prohibit fish farming in US Great Lakes waters

A member of Congress is sponsoring a bill to prohibit fish farming in waters of the Great Lakes within the United States. Democratic Rep. Dan Kildee of Michigan says poorly operated aquaculture facilities can increase pollution, destroy fish habitat, spread disease and introduce non-native species. Michigan has received proposals for net-like commercial fishing enclosures in the Great Lakes. There are none in U.S. Great Lakes waters at present, although Canada has allowed them. Kildee’s bill al…
See all stories on this topic

Miami Boat Show 2017 New Boats and Product Preview

Miami’s famed boat show — in its 76th year — opens Thursday, Feb. 15 at Miami Marine Stadium. This is the show’s second year at the on-water Virginia Key location. Miami Boat Show organizers predict that more than 100,000 boating enthusiasts from around the world will descend on the iconic Miami Marine Stadium on Rickenbacker Causeway for the event’s 76th appearance — Thursday, Feb. 15 through Monday, February 20 (President’s Day). The boat show is just in its second year at that locatio…
See all stories on this topic

Miami Fishing

Miami Fishing

If you are tired of taking the usual trip down to the docks just to catch a few fish, you may want to consider fishing in a style that will add some adventure and excitement. Miami Fishing Charters are becoming very popular. They allow anyone to have an adventure in a group type setting that provides way more social interaction and fun than if you were fishing by yourself. Now if you are not too familiar with the term fishing charters, it is time that you became more acquainted with them. Visit…
See all stories on this topic

Fish and Game proposes fee increases, price lock

Fish and Game proposes fee increases, price lock

BOISE — Idaho Fish and Game officials plan to ask the Idaho Legislature to approve a price increase on resident licenses, tags and fees for 2018. Fish and Game proposes fee increases, price lock By IDAHO PRESS-TRIBUNE STAFF outdoors@idahopress.com The Miami County Republic | 0 comments The increases would range from $1 to $6, but the agency is also giving residents a chance to avoid paying increased fees by purchasing a license each year starting in 2017. An online service is needed to v…
See all stories on this topic

Famous fisherman hauls in kilo of cocaine off Miami coastline

MIAMI – A sport fisherman hauled in a big one, and it had nothing to do with ocean creatures. Mark Quartiano, AKA “Mark the Shark,” was about 2 miles off the coast of Miami Wednesday when he came upon a bundle bobbing in the water. Upon closer inspection, the bundle turned out to be a kilo of cocaine. (WARNING: The following video contains language that some may feel is inappropriate) Using a net, a member of Quartiano’s crew retrieves the drugs. Quartiano contacted the…
See all stories on this topic

Mark the Shark Finds Floating Brick of Cocaine While Fishing Off Miami

“Nothing to see here! ” famed charter captain Mark “the Shark” Quartiano hollered this morning as his crew scooped what appears to be a bale of cocaine out of the waters off Miami. The love-him-or-hate him shark fisherman, profiled earlier this year by New Times, was taking clients fishing around 8 a.m. when he noticed something bobbing in the water and turned back. His first mate used a net to bring the green, barnacle-studded package aboard the Striker-1. It was about a foot-and-half by …
See all stories on this topic

Underwater Maryland canyon could see new protections

Less than 60 miles off the coast of Maryland, the ocean is peppered with bubblegum corals and mahi mahi in the Baltimore Canyon — one of 70 similar formations in the Atlantic created by ancient rivers. The National Aquarium in Baltimore is working to preserve this unique marine environment that reaches more than 11,600 feet deep — about 8.5 times the height of New York’s One World Trade Center — and is pushing to designate the area as the nation’s first urban national marine sanctuary. Th…
See all stories on this topic

Fisherman Finds Kilo of Cocaine in Waters Off Miami

Fisherman Finds Kilo of Cocaine in Waters Off Miami Charter boat captain Mark “The Shark” Quartiano says he was about a mile off Government Cut when he snagged a kilo of cocaine Wednesday. Quartiano posed for a photo with the kilo but said he turned it in to the U.S. Coast Guard….
See all stories on this topic

Duterte to declare disputed area a no-fishing zone for all

Duterte to declare disputed area a no-fishing zone for all

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has decided to declare a lagoon in China-controlled waters to be a marine sanctuary where Filipinos and Chinese will be prohibited from fishing, officials said Monday. China seized the Scarborough Shoal in 2012 after a tense standoff with the Philippines. Duterte’s plan is delicate because it may imply Philippine territorial control there. Chinese coast guard ships have closely guarded the shoal since then, and both governments have suspected the other of pl…
See all stories on this topic

China confirms allowing Philippine fishermen access to shoal

China confirms allowing Philippine fishermen access to shoal

China’s Foreign Ministry on Monday confirmed a decision to allow Philippine fishermen access to a disputed shoal following a visit to Beijing by the Philippine president. Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said Beijing made “proper arrangements” regarding Scarborough Shoal after Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte expressed concern about the matter. China seized the shoal, located 228 kilometers (123 nautical miles) from the northern Philippines, following a 2012 standoff betw…
See all stories on this topic

AP PHOTOS: Egyptian fishing town hosts wall art festival

AP PHOTOS: Egyptian fishing town hosts wall art festival

For the third successive year, an Egyptian fishing town has hosted a unique art festival that attracts participants from home and abroad. The annual event in Burullus injects life and color into the town of about 100,000 residents. Artist Abdel-Wahab Abdel-Mohsen, whose non-profit organization is behind the festival, says its objective is to communicate art directly to the townspeople and visitors. “Forty enthusiastic visual artists from 13 countries have volunteered to change the face of …
See all stories on this topic

Hawaii lawmakers hold public meeting on foreign fishermen

Hawaii lawmakers hold public meeting on foreign fishermen

A woman who worked as an observer on fishing boats that docked in Honolulu described for Hawaii lawmakers what it was like without toilets, showers or hot water. “You have a cold water deck hose as a shower…the water tastes like iron,” said Ashley Watts, a former observer for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Watts’ comments to lawmakers at the state Capitol Wednesday followed an Associated Press investigation that found some fishermen have been confined to vessels for years. A federal loophole allows the foreign men to work but exempts them from most basic labor protections. Many foreign fishermen have to stay on the boats because they are not legally allowed to enter the United States. “It’s hard to sleep, because every day we don’t do something is another night that some folks are suffering,” state Rep. Kaniela Ing said. “It’s very frustrating to just hear people just kind of punt or say maybe over time we can find a solution.” Ing and other lawmakers pressed representatives from the fishing industry and government agencies about what can be done to increase oversight and improve conditions in the industry. Ing asked Jim Cook, board member of the Hawaii Longline Association, whether fishing boat captains could provide copies of contracts between fishermen and boat captains to the state, and Cook said he believed that would be possible. The Hawaii Longline Association, which represents fishing boat owners, created a universal crew contract that will be required on any boat wanting to sell fish in the state’s seafood auction. The group began distributing the contract to boat captains on Oct. 1, and John Kaneko, program manager for Hawaii Seafood Council, estimated less than 60 boat owners have returned the contract so far. Some at the meeting were skeptical that the new industry contract would make a difference, in part because it relies on the industry policing itself, which they say hasn’t worked. “I think the universal contract is a good first step, but it’s far from sufficient,” Ing said. He asked Kaneko if the industry is open to making changes that could strengthen the contract. “I appreciate your contribution, because we’re trying to get something in place quickly,” Kaneko said. “We accept all the criticisms and the contributions.” Alton Miyasaka, a manager in the state Division of Aquatic Resources, said staff used to go out and inspect the boats when there were fewer vessels, but “we don’t have the necessary staff to go out to the boats regularly.” Before the meeting, a group of Hawaii residents and activists rallied outside the state Capitol to call for better conditions for fishermen, demanding an end to what they call unacceptable living and working conditions. “There are a lot of ideas for reform,” said Khara Jabola, chapter coordinator for af3irm Hawaii, an organization that focuses on human trafficking. “At a minimum, there needs to be a rejection of the industry’s proposal for self-regulation.” Over six months, The Associated Press obtained confidential contracts, reviewed dozens of business records and interviewed boat owners, brokers and more than 50 fishermen in Hawaii, Indonesia and San Francisco. The investigation found men living in squalor on some boats, forced to use buckets instead of toilets, suffering running sores from bed bugs and sometimes lacking sufficient food. It also revealed instances of human trafficking. The report was part of the AP’s ongoing global look at labor abuses in the fishing industry, stretching from Southeast Asia to America’s own waters. Last year, the AP reported on fishermen locked in a cage and others buried under fake names on the remote Indonesian island village of Benjina. Their catch was traced to the United States, leading to more than 2,000 slaves being freed. Federal law requires that U.S. citizens make up 75 percent of the crew on most commercial fishing vessels in America. The fleet in Hawaii has an exemption carved out years ago, largely by lawmakers no longer in office.
See all stories on this topic

Hawaii lawmakers hold public meeting on foreign fishermen

Hawaii lawmakers held a meeting to discuss conditions in the Hawaii longline fishing fleet and heard from an observer who described what it’s like to live on the boats. “The worst conditions would be no toilet, no shower, no hot water,” said Ashley Watts, a former observer for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, who spent weeks at sea with various boats over seven years at the federal agency. “You have a cold water deck hose as a shower…the water tastes like iron.” The meeting on Wednesday followed an Associated Press investigation that found some fishermen have been confined to vessels for years. A federal loophole allows the foreign men to work but exempts them from most basic labor protections. Many foreign fishermen have to stay on the boats because they are not legally allowed to enter the United States. “It’s hard to sleep, because every day we don’t do something is another night that some folks are suffering,” state Rep. Kaniela Ing said. “It’s very frustrating to just hear people just kind of punt or say maybe over time we can find a solution.” Ing and other lawmakers pressed representatives from the fishing industry and government agencies about what can be done to increase oversight and improve conditions in the industry. Ing asked Jim Cook, board member of the Hawaii Longline Association, whether fishing boat captains could provide copies of contracts between fishermen and boat captains to the state, and Cook said he believed that would be possible. The Hawaii Longline Association, which represents fishing boat owners, created a universal crew contract that will be required on any boat wanting to sell fish in the state’s seafood auction. The group began distributing the contract to boat captains on Oct. 1, and John Kaneko, program manager for Hawaii Seafood Council, estimated less than 60 boat owners have returned the contract so far. Some at the meeting were skeptical that the new industry contract would make a difference, in part because it relies on the industry policing itself, which they say hasn’t worked. “I think the universal contract is a good first step, but it’s far from sufficient,” Ing said. He asked Kaneko if the industry is open to making changes that could strengthen the contract. “I appreciate your contribution, because we’re trying to get something in place quickly,” Kaneko said. “We accept all the criticisms and the contributions.” Alton Miyasaka, a manager in the state Division of Aquatic Resources, said staff used to go out and inspect the boats when there were fewer vessels, but “we don’t have the necessary staff to go out to the boats regularly.” Before the meeting, Hawaii residents rallied outside the state Capitol to call for better conditions for fishermen, demanding an end to what they call unacceptable living and working conditions. “There are a lot of ideas for reform,” said Khara Jabola, chapter coordinator for af3irm Hawaii, an organization that focuses on human trafficking. “At a minimum, there needs to be a rejection of the industry’s proposal for self-regulation.” Over six months, The Associated Press obtained confidential contracts, reviewed dozens of business records and interviewed boat owners, brokers and more than 50 fishermen in Hawaii, Indonesia and San Francisco. The investigation found men living in squalor on some boats, forced to use buckets instead of toilets, suffering running sores from bed bugs and sometimes lacking sufficient food. It also revealed instances of human trafficking. The report was part of the AP’s ongoing global look at labor abuses in the fishing industry, stretching from Southeast Asia to America’s own waters. Last year, the AP reported on fishermen locked in a cage and others buried under fake names on the remote Indonesian island village of Benjina. Their catch was traced to the United States, leading to more than 2,000 slaves being freed. Federal law requires that U.S. citizens make up 75 percent of the crew on most commercial fishing vessels in America. The fleet in Hawaii has an exemption carved out years ago, largely by lawmakers no longer in office.
See all stories on this topic

The Latest: Hawaii citizens to protest fishing conditions

The Latest on a meeting to discuss conditions among the Hawaii longline fleet (all times local): 4:30 p.m. Hawaii lawmakers are pressing representatives from the fishing industry about what can be done to improve conditions for workers. A former boat observer said Wednesday she stayed on boats where there were no toilets or showers. State Rep. Kaniela Ing is asking the Hawaii Longline Association to provide contracts between fishermen and boat captains to the state. Jim Cook of the Hawaii Longl…
See all stories on this topic

Making other wishes come true

Making other wishes come true

Kimberly Barkerkbarker@miaminewsrecord.com WYANDOTTE— After being approved for Make-A-Wish, 8-year-old Rowdy Marlow was inspired to pay it forward and fulfill another child’s wish in Oklahoma. Rowdy parents are McKenzi and Chance Marlow of Wyandotte who also have a second son named Dax, 6. Both Rowdy and Dax attend Wyandotte Elementary. Rowdy has a rare form of muscular dystrophy called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). It’s a group of hereditary disorders that damage the ne…
See all stories on this topic

Tips And No Tricks

5 Keys to a Happy Marriage

A happy marriage is not an accident, you have to play your part...


Children Learn Violence From A Young Age

We may be playing a bigger role then we think in youth violence....

Contribute To Our Website

Do you want to share your story?

Contact us and we can review your story for publication.

Do you have a website in Miami? Link with us and help us spread the word.

Ask A Question