living in love and harmony

Sports

A few summer thoughts about bugs, fish and quail

A few summer thoughts about bugs, fish and quail

A few summer thoughts about bugs, fish and quail By Beth Conner The Miami County Republic | 0 comments I had the most interesting thing happen the other evening while I was watering my garden (pre-storms on Friday evening). I was trying to adjust my sprinkler so that it would cover the flowered areas. The water was supposed to hit my new flowers and NOT the weeds. My watering device wasn’t working to my liking placed on the ground, so I stood outside holding the sprinkler in my hands. In…
See all stories on this topic

Department of Natural Resources cuts state fair presence

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources will no longer have a large presence at the state fair, where it has previously promoted hunting, fishing and other recreational pursuits. A department spokesman told the Wisconsin State Journal (http://bit.ly/2rCAEed ) the department will no longer send between 100 to 200 staff members to the 11-day event. The decision is part of the department’s attempt to refocus its efforts after budget cuts and criticism from the Legislature. The department is …
See all stories on this topic

Big fish fry planned for Saturday in Louisburg

Photo courtesy of Larry Bond The four Louisburg men who caught the fish for Saturday’s Mason fish fry display just one morning’s catch, hauling in more than 150 pounds of catfish. The fishermen are (from left) William “Captain Buddy” Rogers, Mark Seely, Larry Bond and Colton Seely. William “Captain Buddy” Rogers battles a fish during the day to get bait for the night’s catfish lines. Rogers has helped catch fish for the annual Mason Peace Lodge 243 Fish Fry for the past eight yea…
See all stories on this topic

Miami-style luxury on Kinsale’s ‘Golden Mile’ for €2.75m

The Scilly peninsula in Kinsale takes its name from the Cornish fishermen who arrived in the area when the town was a major fishing port and decided to make the location their home. It is no wonder they remained in this wonderful spot – which is within minutes of the town yet away from the hustle and bustle. Known locally as the Golden Mile, it is the most sought after location in Kinsale. The current owners of Corafinne, one of whom is originally from Cork and based in the UK, sought a site …
See all stories on this topic

Lawmakers: Codfather’s permits should go to Northeast states

Maine’s congressional delegation says fishing permits forfeited by a fishing magnate dubbed “The Codfather” should be redistributed through the Northeastern states. Carlos Rafael was indicted on more than two dozen counts, including tax evasion and falsifying fishing quotas last year. He’s due for sentencing on June 27. Maine Sens. Susan Collins and Angus King and Reps. Chellie Pingree and Bruce Poliquin sent a letter to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross asking that 13 groundfish permits forfeited…
See all stories on this topic

Thousands of dead fish found floating in bays, washed ashore

Thousands of dead fish found floating in bays, washed ashore

Police say the thousands of dead bait fish found floating in Maine bays over the weekend is due to a fishing vessel catching more than it could handle. The Brunswick Police Marine Resource & Harbor Management Division says it followed up on weekend complaints of “hundreds of thousands” of dead fish in the bays. They determined a fishing expedition on June 6 caused the kill of the bait-fish pogies. Police say the fishing vessel was not equipped to handle a large catch of pogies and left them…
See all stories on this topic

Budget cuts threaten forests’ roads, hunting, fishing

The roads to the national forests could get bumpier. Literally. Trails could get messier. Maintenance on bridges, dams and recreation sites could become tougher. That’s the potential fate of national forest projects, thanks to President Donald Trump’s proposed budget for fiscal 2018, which begins Oct. 1. While the overall federal budget has plenty of cuts in agency after agency, the forest service plan has more drama, because the White House is seeking about $100 million in funding for capital improvement and maintenance, down from $363 million this year. That’s a 73 percent cut, and could have a huge impact on recreation, according to Rebecca Turner, senior director of programs and policy for American Forests, a nonprofit conservation organization. Turner said roads are used to access the trails leading to “majestic overlooks,” as well as lakes and rivers inside the forests. She said the budget cuts would also lead to camp sites and facilities not being maintained. Turner said if the forest service is unable to maintain safe roads, boat launches and campgrounds, they’re likely to simply close. “When you can’t access the forests, then it’s much harder to enjoy them,” she said. John Haynes, a spokesperson for the Forest Service, said it would be “premature” to comment on the proposed budget before it is finalized by Congress. The Forest Service manages the 154 national forests around the country that cover more than 180 million acres. Millions of people visit the forests every year. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell said his agency will focus on maintaining “staff and expertise” in anticipation of President Trump’s infrastructure plan, few details of which were outlined in the 2018 budget. “When the infrastructure plan moves forward, then we’ll be well positioned to be able to implement projects,” Tidwell told Senators at a hearing on the forest service budget. But Tidwell told McClatchy that the administration has not made it clear when or if that money will come. “If additional funds are not made available through the infrastructure plan, or additional opportunities, then the budget request for roads and trails and infrastructure would make it very challenging, more challenging, for us to carry out our program of work,” Tidwell said. Coalter Baker, a spokesperson for the Office of Management and Budget, said there were no details on the infrastructure plan beyond the six-page fact sheet included in the budget which does not mention the forest service. “It’s nice to hope, but until we see a draft let alone a bill … we’re hoping for something that we don’t know would exist,” Turner said. Both Republicans and Democrats have raised concerns. “How do we sustain the $10 billion generated by visitors to our national forests and the 143,000 jobs they create if we don’t have roads to access the forest, or safe and accessible facilities or hiking trails for visitors to use once they are there,” Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M. said at a Senate hearing recently on the forest service budget. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, also raised concerns about the cut’s impact on roads, noting cuts could make it tougher for timber purchasers to access the forests. H. Sterling Burnett, a research fellow on environmental policy at the Heartland Institute, a conservative think tank in Illinois, said the budget cuts are necessary to control spending. He said since cuts to politically popular programs such as defense or entitlements like Medicare are unlikely, agencies like the forest service will have to see their budgets squeezed. “[Budget cuts] have to come and they have to be steep,” he said. “You can’t fiddle around the edges.” Burnett said the government should consider selling some of its land to private companies both to raise money and to reduce the amount of forest it has to manage. “There is no reason the federal government needs to own 100 million acres of forest,” he said.
See all stories on this topic

Montana Fish Technology Center to celebrate 125 years

Montana Fish Technology Center to celebrate 125 years

Montana’s Bozeman Fish Technology Center is set to celebrate 125 years of operation. The Bozeman Daily Chronicle reports (http://bit.ly/2sLeIi4 ) the center will celebrate the milestone Saturday with a day of special events held in conjunction with the center’s annual Watershed Festival. Established in 1892, the center was opened as the first national fish hatchery in the northern Rocky Mountains and was responsible for keeping lakes and rivers stocked with enough fish to sustain the ecosystem….
See all stories on this topic

Greek anti-austerity protesters pelt police with fish

Protesters outside Greece’s parliament threw boxes of fish at police on Friday ahead of a vote that approved new austerity measures. Members of a communist-backed labor union hurled the crates of sardines at police as lawmakers debated the cuts, which were added to draft legislation on fishing regulations in an attempt to speed up their passage through parliament. Greece’s left-wing government is trying to reach a deal on reforms with international bailout lenders that would unfreeze the flow o…
See all stories on this topic

Breast cancer survivors go fly-fishing for solace, healing

Breast cancer survivors go fly-fishing for solace, healing

Spaced out up and down a stretch of the Little River, more than a dozen women stand in the moving water in overall waders casting fly rods, some for the first time. The women — all breast cancer survivors in different stages of treatment and recovery — are taking part in a free weekend fly-fishing retreat that offers them more than fishing. The event, held each spring by the nonprofit Casting for Recovery, covers the basics of fly-fishing while offering the women support, counseling, medica…
See all stories on this topic

Indian fishermen try new nets for healthier oceans

The fishermen were dubious when ocean experts suggested they could save their dwindling marine stocks just by switching to new nets. It took years for the U.N. Development Program to convince the fishing communities along India’s tropical western coast that the diamond-mesh nets they were using were trapping baby fish, while a square-shaped mesh could allow small fish to escape to maintain a breeding population. But two years after the new nets were fully adopted, fishermen insist they’re making a difference. “This square net is a blessing for us,” said John Gabriel Naronha, who runs six trawlers in the area. “When the small fish grows up, the fishermen can really benefit … we can get good prices for big fish. And the small fish gets a chance to grow.” The project, launched in 2011, is one of many being showcased at a major conference on oceans beginning Monday, where the United Nations will plead with nations to help halt a global assault on marine life and ecosystems that is threatening jobs, economies and even human lives. “The oceans of the planet are in dire need of urgent action,” said Marina Walter, deputy director for UNDP in India. That action is even more urgent now that climate change is causing ocean temperatures to rise while waters also become more acidic, causing widespread destruction of coral reefs that sustain a quarter of all marine species. But conservation efforts work best when they’re linked with local livelihoods, Walter said. “You cannot work on biodiversity or life underwater in isolation, without looking at the livelihoods of people, the bread and butter.” No one in 80 or so fishing villages of Sindhudurg district expected to have problems fishing, after centuries of their families relying on the sea. Located in one of India’s 11 ecologically critical coastline habitats, the area is teeming with life from more than 350 marine species including Indian Ocean dolphins and Olive Ridley turtles. Colorful corals span the shallows, while tangles of mangrove forests protect the land from water erosion. But that bounty has suffered against the twin assaults of overfishing and pollution, which caused a steady decline local fish stocks and forced fishermen to push further out to sea. Since switching to new nets, fishermen say fish stocks are recovering, though there is no data collected yet to prove it. Surveys of fish population may be conducted at the end of this year, when the UNDP finishes its six-year project in the area. The struggles of India’s fishermen are hardly unique. About one out of every 10 people in the world relies directly on the ocean to survive. Most of those are among the world’s poorest and most vulnerable, meaning they have few substitutes when marine life declines. And it is declining rapidly, thanks to increased fishing for an expanding global population and unchecked runoff of industrial chemicals, sewage and other pollutants. Already, about 90 percent of wild fisheries around the world are over-exploited or collapsed. Meanwhile, the UNDP has also helped set up a crab farming project in the Sindudurg area to encourage local preservation of the mangroves and resistance to land developers and those gathering firewood from chopping the saltwater-tolerant trees down. Now, nurseries for crab seedlings line up along a 2-acre (8,000-square-meter) stretch of backwater pools filled with the mud that crabs like to dig into. It takes up to nine months for the crabs to grow to full size, at which point they are harvested and sold for about $15 per kilogram ($6.80 a pound). Recently, the group of nine women and one man earned nearly $1,000 in profits from a single harvest. Local officials are delighted with the low-fuss process and positive results. “With very little manipulation of the environment, you can grow crabs wherever you have mangroves,” said N. Vasudevan, who heads a special unit dedicated to mangrove conservation for the government of India’s western state of Maharashtra.
See all stories on this topic

Discount deadline Apr. 15 for EcoAdventures Summer Camps

Discount deadline Apr. 15 for EcoAdventures Summer Camps

For outdoor-minded adventure-loving kids, the Miami-Dade Parks, Recreation and Open Spaces Department is bringing back four exciting Miami EcoAdventures nature camps this summer that get them up-close to the wild side of county parks. A 10 percent Early Bird Enrollment discount is being offered through Apr. 15. Parents are encouraged to register their child/children early, as registration slots fill up quickly for these popular camps. To register, visit or call one of these area Miami EcoAdvent…
See all stories on this topic

Holiday Brush Fire Chars Nearly 5000+ Acres

Follow CBSMIAMI.COM: Facebook | Twitter FT LAUDERDALE (CBSMiami) – Low humidity and gusty winds are contributing to a meandering brush fire burning in Everglades Holiday Park. As of Friday afternoon, the Florida Forestry Service said the fire has chewed through nearly 5,500 acres but is 45 percent contained. It was a monumental effort as firefighters battled to save the nearly two dozen structures at Mack’s Fish Camp off Krome Avenue, which has been there since the 1930s. The owners of …
See all stories on this topic

Shifting message? After depicting coal, agency shows fishing

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management is back to picturing the great outdoors on its internet home page after raising eyebrows with a prominent photo of a huge coal deposit in Wyoming. Some interpreted the image of the coal at Peabody’s North Antelope Rochelle Mine as a sign of the Trump administration’s support for coal. On Friday, the BLM changed its lead website photo to a fly fisherman on the North Platte River in Wyoming. The river flows 50 miles south of the coal in the previous photo. BLM o…
See all stories on this topic

Outdoors: Southwest Ohio offers fine fishing

Email sent We have sent you an email with a link to change your password. Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and bonus content- exclusively for subscribers. Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks This subscriber-only site gives you exclusive access to breaking news, in-depth coverage, exclusive interactives and bonus content. You can read free articles of your choice a month that are only available on myDaytonDailyNews.com. We have sent you a verification email. Plea…
See all stories on this topic

Closure of Seattle tackle shop sign of changing times

Closure of Seattle tackle shop sign of changing times

There was a time when small, locally owned tackle shops dotted the downtown Seattle landscape, a sight that would make Starbucks jitter with envy. Before and through most of the 20th century, places such as Linc’s Tackle Shop, a mom-and-pop operation on the corner of Rainier Avenue and King Street, were gathering places, like an old barber shop where people would exchange fish tales. Now closure is looming for this nostalgic tackle shop — one of a handful remaining in greater Puget Sound regi…
See all stories on this topic

Truckloads of baby fish hauled to river in restoration plan

These speckled, rose-tinted fish haven’t been spotted in this bubbling river in remote northeastern Oregon for more than 30 years — until now. But this week, the waters of the Lostine River suddenly came alive as hundreds of the 4- and 5-inch-long juvenile coho salmon shot from a long white hose attached to a water tanker truck and into the frigid current. The fish jumped and splashed and some, momentarily shell-shocked, hid along the bank as onlookers crowded in for photos. “All of us a…
See all stories on this topic

Inclusivity measure stirs debate in Alaska fishing town

Inclusivity measure stirs debate in Alaska fishing town

The small Alaska fishing community of Homer is no stranger to political activism. In the 1970s, a landmark legal case involving one of its residents found the constitutional right to privacy in Alaska extends to the at-home use of marijuana. In 1989, Homer became a “nuclear-free” zone. And just last month, hundreds turned out for a women’s march in the city. Now, Homer is wading deeper into the national political debate, becoming the latest U.S. city to consider affirming its commitme…
See all stories on this topic

Miami Boat Show NMMA Innovation Award Winners Announced for 2017

Miami Boat Show NMMA Innovation Award Winners Announced for 2017

The Miami Boat Show’s 2017 NMMA Innovation Award winners spanned 23 categories of competition. Twenty-one new products from boat-maintenance tools to engine innovations and boats claimed top awards for innovation from the National Marine Manufacturers Association and Boating Writers International during the 2017 Miami International Boat Show that ended Feb. 20. This year’s judges — a committee of eight BWI members — reviewed 63 products across 23 categories in the days leading up to the s…
See all stories on this topic

Scallop fishing areas closing to curb over-exploitation

Maine fishing regulators are temporarily closing several scallop fishing areas beginning this weekend to prevent the valuable shellfish from over-harvest. WCSH-TV reports (http://on.wcsh6.com/2lMNZjV ) the state Department of Marine Resources closures take effect on Sunday for the Damariscotta River in Lincoln County, North Haven and mid-Penobscot Bay. The closures will also take place in the Lower Blue Hill Bay and Jericho Bay area, and the Chandler Bay and Head Harbor area. The closures are t…
See all stories on this topic

MIAMI 2017: Size and presence of center consoles grow

MIAMI 2017: Size and presence of center consoles grow

Boston Whaler president Nick Stickler (right) introduces the new 380 Outrage center console Friday at the Miami International Boat Show. Also shown are vice president of sales, marketing and customer service Jeff Vaughn (center) and design manager Charlie Foss. MIAMI — After a couple days of pounding the docks at the Miami International Boat Show, it’s easy to see that center consoles will continue to get bigger during the next two to three years, with more builders joining the 50-foot club…
See all stories on this topic

Lawmaker: Protect trapping, hunting, fishing in constitution

A Republican lawmaker wants voters to add protections for trapping, hunting and fishing to the Montana constitution. The Helena Independent-Record reports (bit.ly/2l3kSrO) state Sen. Jennifer Fielder of Thompson Falls says her proposal would fend off any attempts by opponents of hunting or trapping to ban the practices. The Senate Fish and Game Committee discussed the measure Thursday. It calls for a statewide referendum on the proposed amendment. An amendment approved by voters in 2004 is gene…
See all stories on this topic

Liberians accuse 2 boats of illegal fishing, seek $1 million

Liberians accuse 2 boats of illegal fishing, seek $1 million

Liberian authorities say they’ve impounded two foreign fishing vessels and are seeking $1 million in compensation. Defense Minister Brownie Samukai said Friday that one of the boats was a Chinese vessel that paid just $700 for a permit to import 40 tons of fish. However, he told state radio that officials found that the permit was being used for multiple vessels, carrying a total of 130 tons of fish. The other vessel is Spanish-owned but Senegalese-flagged. Liberian authorities are citing 25 vi…
See all stories on this topic

Mitigation priorities in the hands of fish and game

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game will spent time this spring planning and implementing mitigation measures for the Black Canyon Reservoir and Lower Payette River. In November 2016, the IDFG received funds from the 2013 mitigation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. Mitigation priorities in the hands of fish and game By DIANA BAIRD newsroom@messenger-index.com The Miami County Republic | 0 comments The mitigation was the result of a problem that occurred in 2013 when the BOR drew wate…
See all stories on this topic

Bill would prohibit fish farming in US Great Lakes waters

A member of Congress is sponsoring a bill to prohibit fish farming in waters of the Great Lakes within the United States. Democratic Rep. Dan Kildee of Michigan says poorly operated aquaculture facilities can increase pollution, destroy fish habitat, spread disease and introduce non-native species. Michigan has received proposals for net-like commercial fishing enclosures in the Great Lakes. There are none in U.S. Great Lakes waters at present, although Canada has allowed them. Kildee’s bill al…
See all stories on this topic

Miami Boat Show 2017 New Boats and Product Preview

Miami’s famed boat show — in its 76th year — opens Thursday, Feb. 15 at Miami Marine Stadium. This is the show’s second year at the on-water Virginia Key location. Miami Boat Show organizers predict that more than 100,000 boating enthusiasts from around the world will descend on the iconic Miami Marine Stadium on Rickenbacker Causeway for the event’s 76th appearance — Thursday, Feb. 15 through Monday, February 20 (President’s Day). The boat show is just in its second year at that locatio…
See all stories on this topic

Tips And No Tricks

5 Keys to a Happy Marriage

A happy marriage is not an accident, you have to play your part...


Children Learn Violence From A Young Age

We may be playing a bigger role then we think in youth violence....

Contribute To Our Website

Do you want to share your story?

Contact us and we can review your story for publication.

Do you have a website in Miami? Link with us and help us spread the word.

Ask A Question