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Man overboard uses prosthetic leg to stay afloat

Man overboard uses prosthetic leg to stay afloat

An Ohio man says his prosthetic leg helped save his life after he went overboard during a fishing trip. Adam Shannon, of Doylestown, says he was fishing on Dohner Lake near his home Monday evening when a seat on his boat broke, sending him into the water. Shannon’s prosthetic leg came off as he went into the lake. The 45-year-old was able to use his prosthetic as a floatation device when it got trapped in his pants and filled with air. Shannon called 911 for help, and his yelling attracted the …
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South Africa searches for 8 missing fishermen after capsize

Maritime emergency teams in South Africa are searching for eight missing fishermen whose boat capsized several days ago, killing at least one crewmember. Seven of the 16 crewmembers were rescued after the accident early Sunday off Cape St. Francis in Eastern Cape province. One body was recovered. President Jacob Zuma on Wednesday said emergency workers “will not rest” until they find the missing crewmembers from the fishing vessel Maredon. South African media reported high waves and strong wind…
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GOP targets Endangered Species Act as protections lifted

Congressional Republicans are moving forward with legislation to roll back the Endangered Species Act, amid complaints that the landmark 44-year-old law hinders drilling, logging and other activities. At simultaneous hearings Wednesday, House and Senate committees considered bills to revise the law and limit lengthy and costly litigation associated with it. The bills come as a federal court lifted federal protections for gray wolves in Wyoming and the Trump administration moved to lift protections for grizzly bears in and near Yellowstone National Park. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke also is reviewing federal efforts to conserve the imperiled sage grouse in 11 Western states. House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Rob Bishop said the bills would curb excessive litigation and allow officials to focus on actual species conservation. All too often, the endangered species law “has been misused to control land, block a host of economic activities important for jobs … proliferate costly litigation that drains taxpayer resources away from actual conservation efforts,” said Bishop, a Utah Republican. Arizona Rep. Raul Grijalva, the panel’s senior Democrat, said the law “does not need congressional meddling to work better. What it needs is congressional support.” Despite years of Republican efforts to pass bills weakening the species law and cut funding for agencies responsible for protecting and recovering imperiled American wildlife, “99 percent of listed species have continued to survive, and 90 percent are on schedule to meet their recovery goals,” Grijalva said. Environmental groups called the simultaneous hearings a “one-two punch” on threatened wildlife. “While nine out of ten Americans want to protect endangered species and their habitat, Congressional leaders are spending their time dismantling the ESA in favor of special interests,” said Jamie Rappaport Clark, president and CEO of Defenders of Wildlife. “Enactment of any of these bills will only hasten the disappearance of endangered and threatened species from our planet.” Five bills were being considered by the House panel, and a sixth bill was being heard in the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee. One of the bills would allow economic factors to be considered in some species-listing decisions, while another would cap attorneys’ fees in endangered species cases. Both the House and Senate would “delist” the gray wolf as a protected species in the western Great Lakes and Wyoming, with management turned over to state officials in Wyoming, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. The bills also block further judicial review of a 2011 decision by the Fish and Wildlife Service to remove federal protections for the wolves. Gray wolves were once hunted to the brink of extinction in most of the country, but now number over 5,500 in the lower 48 states, including nearly 3,800 in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan and nearly 400 in Wyoming. Rep. Collin Peterson, D-Minn., said the current law prevents Midwest farmers from killing wolves even if they attack cattle or pets. “The states, not the federal government, are best equipped to manage their gray wolf populations by balancing safety, economic and species-management issues,” he said. Sen. John. Barrasso, R-Wyo., chairman of the Senate environment panel, said the bipartisan Senate bill would enhance recreational hunting and sport fishing, ensure common-sense environmental regulation and protect wildlife and wildlife habitat. The bill reauthorizes several environmental programs, promotes public target ranges for recreational shooting and allows fishermen to continue using lead tackle, among other provisions. Gregory Sheehan, acting director of the Fish and Wildlife Service, said the Trump administration generally supports the House bills, with “some technical modifications.” His agency plays a key role in preventing extinctions and aiding recovery, Sheehan said, “but states and the people on the ground who have long been stewards of the land are in the best position to be the primary caretakers of species over the long-term.”
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Florida's fishing girls of Instagram

Florida’s fishing girls of Instagram

Florida fisherwomen can reel in the big ones just like their male counterparts. And they’re taking to social media to prove it. Several female South Florida anglers share their catches of the day on social-media networks, particularly Instagram, attracting thousands of followers. Don’t be fooled by their slim bodies and skinny arms. These girls can fight blue marlin, swordfish, mahi, tuna, sailfish and more. “A lot of people are really doubtful. You definitely have to prove yourself. You …
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Baby eel lottery is a go in Maine, where elver fishing pays

Maine is implementing a new lottery system for licenses to fish for baby eels, which are worth more than $1,000 per pound on the worldwide sushi market. Baby eels, called elvers, are a major fishery in Maine, where fishermen sell them to dealers so they can be sent to Asian aquaculture companies to be raised to maturity and used as food. But industry members and lawmakers have said the fishery needs a way to bring new people into the business because many elver fishermen are nearing retirement …
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Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine tours Florida amid rumors of gubernatorial bid

Tags: Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine, miami beach, florida governor, Image…
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Historical Vignettes: Smokehouse Sally, popular restaurateur, Part 1

  Many people through the years have moved to Martin County to retire and enjoy a more leisurely lifestyle. There are some, however, like Sally and Bill Peters who relocated to the little community to establish a profitable business in a small friendly town. ] Actually the couple had owned and operated the popular Mrs. Peters Smoked Fish, an eatery in Miami for decades, but  decided to relocate to Rio, Florida in 1958. Bill’s wife, known as “Smokehouse Sally,” would be the driving force i…
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150 pounds of cocaine found aboard boat in Miami

150 pounds of cocaine found aboard boat in Miami

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US Customs snags major drug bust on Nassau Boat in Miami

Miami, Florida, July 12th 2017: Five people have been arrested in Miami after 150 pounds (68 kilos) of cocaine were found on a fishing boat that was stopped near the Miami River on Tuesday. The find is said to have a street value of $2,720,000.00. U.S. Customs and Border Protection boarded the boat, Wes Win, one of two boats coming from Nassau. During a normal inspection and search, the officers found 70 packages of cocaine in blue bundled boxes that were behind a stack of Junkanoo Punch soda c…
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Japan protests armed N. Korean boat in Tokyo economic zone

Japan has protested to North Korea after a Japanese patrol vessel spotted an armed boat believed to be from there allegedly fishing illegally, an official said Thursday. The crew pointed a gun at the Japanese fisheries vessel, forcing it to withdraw, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told a news conference. The incident happened last Friday about 500 kilometers (310 miles) west of Japan’s northern coast in an area Tokyo claims as its exclusive economic zone, Suga said. Suga said that Japan…
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150 pounds of cocaine seized from fishing boat along Miami River

Four crew members of a fishing vessel were apprehended Tuesday in Miami after U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials seized 150 pounds of cocaine during a routine inspection, authorities said. The boat, named the Wes Win, was one of two arriving from Nassau that was flagged for a regular inspection at the RMK Merrill-Stevens Shipyard at 881 NW 13th Avenue, said Customs and Border Protection spokesman Keith Smith. When officers boarded the boat, they found about 70 blue bundles of the drug…
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East Alabama men arrested for illegal lobster fishing of FL Keys

MARATHON, FL (WTVM) – A group of fishermen, some of them fathers and sons from Eufaula and Phenix City, have been arrested for an illegal head start on the lobster season. That’s according to officers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The suspects are accused of several crimes, including the illegal spearing of 320 lobster in Marathon, Florida. The 2-day lobster sport season in the Florida Keys starts July 26 and the limit is 6 lobster per person per da…
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Buckhead hunting, fishing businesses stick together in move

Buckhead hunting, fishing businesses stick together in move

Go to Admin » Appearance » Widgets » and move Gabfire Widget: Social into that MastheadOverlay zone “We’ve been friends for many years, and I’m glad we could stay next to each other,” Gary Merriman, the owner The Fish Hawk, said of Chuck’s Firearms. The two sporting businesses have operated side-by-side in Buckhead for over 40 years, and have stuck together through two relocations—the latest in March as they make way for a condo tower. They both moved from Buckhead…
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Clearing, rebuilding start at Vaca Key Marina following devastating fire

Clearing, rebuilding start at Vaca Key Marina following devastating fire

It has been one month today since an early-morning fire tore through the bayside Vaca Key Marina near mile marker 47.5. In the four weeks since thousands of lobster traps, a house, boats and forklifts were destroyed on the one-acre property owned by the Berdeal family of Miami on June 5, fishermen at the marina have been busy rebuilding. Clearing of the many piles of charred wood and concrete began Monday at the marina, said Juan Carlos Berdeal. Marathon business Discount Rock and Sand did the …
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World Champion South Florida Lifeguard Killed by Car While Fishing Off Bridge

Coach Chris Nowviskie impatiently checked his watch at the Pompano Beach Aquatic Center while four junior lifeguards dragged faceless mannequins to safety. One of his lifeguards was 45 minutes late for training for Worlds, the big leagues of lifeguard competitions. Seconds later, Nowviskie looked up to see the young man he’d been waiting for lying face-up on the deck. His shaggy, sun-bleached hair draped the tiles, and his body was red with sunburn from surfing all day. Irritated, Nowvisk…
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One bridge, four defendants: Mainlanders cited for fishing violations in Islamorada

The weekend was busy for a Monroe County Sheriff’s Office deputy who put the kibosh on some alleged illegal fishing in Islamorada: Seth Hopp cited four people for resource violations at the Channel 5 Bridge around mile marker 71. Saturday, he was patrolling the south end of the bridge at 7:20 p.m. when he saw two women fishing and asked to inspect their catch, agency spokeswoman Becky Herrin said. They agreed and in a cooler and a bucket, Hopp found “numerous different types of fish, many o…
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Fishing draws 150 to Miami-Erie Canal

DELPHOS — The Optimist Fourth of July Fishing Derby saw 150 young anglers lining the banks of the Miami-Erie Canal early Tuesday morning. Sixty-five fish and a few turtles were pulled from the waterway during the derby. Jaxon Buzard and Paige Mericle were the winners of the new bicycles donated by the Walterick-Hemme Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3035. Buzard caught a 20.5-inch catfish and Mericle a 24-inch catfish. Delphos Herald Affiliates Ada Herald | Dearborn County Register | Eagle …
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Changes to cod, haddock, flounder quotas eyed in New England

Changes to cod, haddock, flounder quotas eyed in New England

Federal fishing regulators are planning a host of changes to the quota limits of several important New England fish, including cod. New England fishermen search for cod in two key fishing areas, Georges Bank and the Gulf of Maine. Regulators have enacted a series of cutbacks to the cod quota in those areas in recent years as cod stocks have dwindled. This year, regulators want to trim the Georges Bank cod quota by 13 percent and keep Gulf of Maine’s quota the same. They also want to keep the Ge…
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South Motors sponsors University of Miami Fishing Tourney

Each year, University of Miami holds a celebrity fishing tournament as a kind of post-celebration and promotion of the University of Miami Sports Hall of Fame. 2017’s event was no different – participants were paired with former Hurricane sports stars for a full day of both inshore and offshore competitive fishing. South Motors, a long-time annual sponsor of the tournament, was on hand with two great catches of its own on display, the award-winning BMW 5 Series and the BMW X5 SAV. …
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Bachelor party fishing

Bachelor party from Toronto : We had a blast with Captain Mark and the crew. Mark was cool and courteous. He was determined to catch that day. We put some serious positive vibes into those waters and Boom!!! We caught a 7 foot 200lb sandbar shark. Great day! It made our trip to Miami!! Booked the trip with Mark after reading the reviews, and he did not disappoint. We wanted to catch a sailfish and 2 hours into our trip, we hooked a large one. Ryan his first mate walked us thru each step and edu…
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The Latest: Cessna plane fell apart in the air in Wisconsin

The Latest on a small plane crash in northern Wisconsin that killed six people (all times local): 1:05 p.m. Authorities say a small airplane crash that killed six people in northern Wisconsin fell apart in the air. National Transportation Safety Board Eric Weiss said Monday the debris from the plane crash suggests there was an “in-flight break up.” NTSB investigators say there was a discussion between the pilot of the plane and air traffic controllers about “local weather phenomenon” shortly be…
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A few summer thoughts about bugs, fish and quail

A few summer thoughts about bugs, fish and quail

A few summer thoughts about bugs, fish and quail By Beth Conner The Miami County Republic | 0 comments I had the most interesting thing happen the other evening while I was watering my garden (pre-storms on Friday evening). I was trying to adjust my sprinkler so that it would cover the flowered areas. The water was supposed to hit my new flowers and NOT the weeds. My watering device wasn’t working to my liking placed on the ground, so I stood outside holding the sprinkler in my hands. In…
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Department of Natural Resources cuts state fair presence

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources will no longer have a large presence at the state fair, where it has previously promoted hunting, fishing and other recreational pursuits. A department spokesman told the Wisconsin State Journal (http://bit.ly/2rCAEed ) the department will no longer send between 100 to 200 staff members to the 11-day event. The decision is part of the department’s attempt to refocus its efforts after budget cuts and criticism from the Legislature. The department is …
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Big fish fry planned for Saturday in Louisburg

Photo courtesy of Larry Bond The four Louisburg men who caught the fish for Saturday’s Mason fish fry display just one morning’s catch, hauling in more than 150 pounds of catfish. The fishermen are (from left) William “Captain Buddy” Rogers, Mark Seely, Larry Bond and Colton Seely. William “Captain Buddy” Rogers battles a fish during the day to get bait for the night’s catfish lines. Rogers has helped catch fish for the annual Mason Peace Lodge 243 Fish Fry for the past eight yea…
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Miami-style luxury on Kinsale’s ‘Golden Mile’ for €2.75m

The Scilly peninsula in Kinsale takes its name from the Cornish fishermen who arrived in the area when the town was a major fishing port and decided to make the location their home. It is no wonder they remained in this wonderful spot – which is within minutes of the town yet away from the hustle and bustle. Known locally as the Golden Mile, it is the most sought after location in Kinsale. The current owners of Corafinne, one of whom is originally from Cork and based in the UK, sought a site …
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Lawmakers: Codfather’s permits should go to Northeast states

Maine’s congressional delegation says fishing permits forfeited by a fishing magnate dubbed “The Codfather” should be redistributed through the Northeastern states. Carlos Rafael was indicted on more than two dozen counts, including tax evasion and falsifying fishing quotas last year. He’s due for sentencing on June 27. Maine Sens. Susan Collins and Angus King and Reps. Chellie Pingree and Bruce Poliquin sent a letter to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross asking that 13 groundfish permits forfeited…
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Thousands of dead fish found floating in bays, washed ashore

Thousands of dead fish found floating in bays, washed ashore

Police say the thousands of dead bait fish found floating in Maine bays over the weekend is due to a fishing vessel catching more than it could handle. The Brunswick Police Marine Resource & Harbor Management Division says it followed up on weekend complaints of “hundreds of thousands” of dead fish in the bays. They determined a fishing expedition on June 6 caused the kill of the bait-fish pogies. Police say the fishing vessel was not equipped to handle a large catch of pogies and left them…
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Budget cuts threaten forests’ roads, hunting, fishing

The roads to the national forests could get bumpier. Literally. Trails could get messier. Maintenance on bridges, dams and recreation sites could become tougher. That’s the potential fate of national forest projects, thanks to President Donald Trump’s proposed budget for fiscal 2018, which begins Oct. 1. While the overall federal budget has plenty of cuts in agency after agency, the forest service plan has more drama, because the White House is seeking about $100 million in funding for capital improvement and maintenance, down from $363 million this year. That’s a 73 percent cut, and could have a huge impact on recreation, according to Rebecca Turner, senior director of programs and policy for American Forests, a nonprofit conservation organization. Turner said roads are used to access the trails leading to “majestic overlooks,” as well as lakes and rivers inside the forests. She said the budget cuts would also lead to camp sites and facilities not being maintained. Turner said if the forest service is unable to maintain safe roads, boat launches and campgrounds, they’re likely to simply close. “When you can’t access the forests, then it’s much harder to enjoy them,” she said. John Haynes, a spokesperson for the Forest Service, said it would be “premature” to comment on the proposed budget before it is finalized by Congress. The Forest Service manages the 154 national forests around the country that cover more than 180 million acres. Millions of people visit the forests every year. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell said his agency will focus on maintaining “staff and expertise” in anticipation of President Trump’s infrastructure plan, few details of which were outlined in the 2018 budget. “When the infrastructure plan moves forward, then we’ll be well positioned to be able to implement projects,” Tidwell told Senators at a hearing on the forest service budget. But Tidwell told McClatchy that the administration has not made it clear when or if that money will come. “If additional funds are not made available through the infrastructure plan, or additional opportunities, then the budget request for roads and trails and infrastructure would make it very challenging, more challenging, for us to carry out our program of work,” Tidwell said. Coalter Baker, a spokesperson for the Office of Management and Budget, said there were no details on the infrastructure plan beyond the six-page fact sheet included in the budget which does not mention the forest service. “It’s nice to hope, but until we see a draft let alone a bill … we’re hoping for something that we don’t know would exist,” Turner said. Both Republicans and Democrats have raised concerns. “How do we sustain the $10 billion generated by visitors to our national forests and the 143,000 jobs they create if we don’t have roads to access the forest, or safe and accessible facilities or hiking trails for visitors to use once they are there,” Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M. said at a Senate hearing recently on the forest service budget. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, also raised concerns about the cut’s impact on roads, noting cuts could make it tougher for timber purchasers to access the forests. H. Sterling Burnett, a research fellow on environmental policy at the Heartland Institute, a conservative think tank in Illinois, said the budget cuts are necessary to control spending. He said since cuts to politically popular programs such as defense or entitlements like Medicare are unlikely, agencies like the forest service will have to see their budgets squeezed. “[Budget cuts] have to come and they have to be steep,” he said. “You can’t fiddle around the edges.” Burnett said the government should consider selling some of its land to private companies both to raise money and to reduce the amount of forest it has to manage. “There is no reason the federal government needs to own 100 million acres of forest,” he said.
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Montana Fish Technology Center to celebrate 125 years

Montana Fish Technology Center to celebrate 125 years

Montana’s Bozeman Fish Technology Center is set to celebrate 125 years of operation. The Bozeman Daily Chronicle reports (http://bit.ly/2sLeIi4 ) the center will celebrate the milestone Saturday with a day of special events held in conjunction with the center’s annual Watershed Festival. Established in 1892, the center was opened as the first national fish hatchery in the northern Rocky Mountains and was responsible for keeping lakes and rivers stocked with enough fish to sustain the ecosystem….
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Greek anti-austerity protesters pelt police with fish

Protesters outside Greece’s parliament threw boxes of fish at police on Friday ahead of a vote that approved new austerity measures. Members of a communist-backed labor union hurled the crates of sardines at police as lawmakers debated the cuts, which were added to draft legislation on fishing regulations in an attempt to speed up their passage through parliament. Greece’s left-wing government is trying to reach a deal on reforms with international bailout lenders that would unfreeze the flow o…
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Breast cancer survivors go fly-fishing for solace, healing

Breast cancer survivors go fly-fishing for solace, healing

Spaced out up and down a stretch of the Little River, more than a dozen women stand in the moving water in overall waders casting fly rods, some for the first time. The women — all breast cancer survivors in different stages of treatment and recovery — are taking part in a free weekend fly-fishing retreat that offers them more than fishing. The event, held each spring by the nonprofit Casting for Recovery, covers the basics of fly-fishing while offering the women support, counseling, medica…
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Indian fishermen try new nets for healthier oceans

The fishermen were dubious when ocean experts suggested they could save their dwindling marine stocks just by switching to new nets. It took years for the U.N. Development Program to convince the fishing communities along India’s tropical western coast that the diamond-mesh nets they were using were trapping baby fish, while a square-shaped mesh could allow small fish to escape to maintain a breeding population. But two years after the new nets were fully adopted, fishermen insist they’re making a difference. “This square net is a blessing for us,” said John Gabriel Naronha, who runs six trawlers in the area. “When the small fish grows up, the fishermen can really benefit … we can get good prices for big fish. And the small fish gets a chance to grow.” The project, launched in 2011, is one of many being showcased at a major conference on oceans beginning Monday, where the United Nations will plead with nations to help halt a global assault on marine life and ecosystems that is threatening jobs, economies and even human lives. “The oceans of the planet are in dire need of urgent action,” said Marina Walter, deputy director for UNDP in India. That action is even more urgent now that climate change is causing ocean temperatures to rise while waters also become more acidic, causing widespread destruction of coral reefs that sustain a quarter of all marine species. But conservation efforts work best when they’re linked with local livelihoods, Walter said. “You cannot work on biodiversity or life underwater in isolation, without looking at the livelihoods of people, the bread and butter.” No one in 80 or so fishing villages of Sindhudurg district expected to have problems fishing, after centuries of their families relying on the sea. Located in one of India’s 11 ecologically critical coastline habitats, the area is teeming with life from more than 350 marine species including Indian Ocean dolphins and Olive Ridley turtles. Colorful corals span the shallows, while tangles of mangrove forests protect the land from water erosion. But that bounty has suffered against the twin assaults of overfishing and pollution, which caused a steady decline local fish stocks and forced fishermen to push further out to sea. Since switching to new nets, fishermen say fish stocks are recovering, though there is no data collected yet to prove it. Surveys of fish population may be conducted at the end of this year, when the UNDP finishes its six-year project in the area. The struggles of India’s fishermen are hardly unique. About one out of every 10 people in the world relies directly on the ocean to survive. Most of those are among the world’s poorest and most vulnerable, meaning they have few substitutes when marine life declines. And it is declining rapidly, thanks to increased fishing for an expanding global population and unchecked runoff of industrial chemicals, sewage and other pollutants. Already, about 90 percent of wild fisheries around the world are over-exploited or collapsed. Meanwhile, the UNDP has also helped set up a crab farming project in the Sindudurg area to encourage local preservation of the mangroves and resistance to land developers and those gathering firewood from chopping the saltwater-tolerant trees down. Now, nurseries for crab seedlings line up along a 2-acre (8,000-square-meter) stretch of backwater pools filled with the mud that crabs like to dig into. It takes up to nine months for the crabs to grow to full size, at which point they are harvested and sold for about $15 per kilogram ($6.80 a pound). Recently, the group of nine women and one man earned nearly $1,000 in profits from a single harvest. Local officials are delighted with the low-fuss process and positive results. “With very little manipulation of the environment, you can grow crabs wherever you have mangroves,” said N. Vasudevan, who heads a special unit dedicated to mangrove conservation for the government of India’s western state of Maharashtra.
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