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The Latest: Mutko says Russia will resort to legal action

The Latest: Mutko says Russia will resort to legal action

The Latest on the Russian doping report (all times local): — 6:30 p.m. Russian Deputy Prime Minister Vitaly Mutko says Russia will resort to legal action in response to allegations of institutionalized doping. Mutko, who was sports minister for the 2012 and 2014 Olympics, the main period covered by the WADA report, tells the Tass state news agency “now we need to calmly move into the legal arena, which is what will be done.” It is not immediately clear what course any legal action might take. Mutko also argues it would not have been possible for Russia to try to cover up doping on such a large scale at the 2014 Olympics in Sochi, saying that because athletes were also tested at competitions outside Russia, “it was simply not realistic in Sochi to do what they are accusing us of.” 5:35 p.m. Travis Tygart, the CEO of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, calls the latest revelations from the McLaren report “another staggering example of how the Olympic movement has been corrupted and clean athletes robbed by Russia’s state-supported doping system.” Tygart is calling on the IOC to suspend Russia’s Olympic committee until it is deemed code compliant. He also says no international sporting events should be held in Russia until the country’s anti-doping program becomes code compliant and all those who participated in the corruption are held accountable. 5 p.m. UEFA says Russian Deputy Prime Minister Vitaly Mutko has begun the process of a FIFA integrity check to be an election candidate in April. Mutko has been elected by European soccer leaders since 2009 to represent them on FIFA’s ruling committee. Now, Mutko is seeking re-election amid widespread evidence detailed by Canadian investigator Richard McLaren that he oversaw a state-backed doping program as sports minister. In July, the World Anti-Doping Agency called on the FIFA ethics committee to investigate Mutko based on McLaren’s interim report. UEFA says Mutko is among five applicants for four vacant seats in an April 5 election of 55 European member federations. Mutko and his four rivals must pass an eligibility check by a FIFA panel to be formally accepted as candidates. Mutko also chairs the 2018 World Cup organizing committee. 4:35 p.m. A veteran Olympic official nominated by Russian President Vladimir Putin to lead the country’s anti-doping fight says Richard McLaren’s latest report is out of date. Vitaly Smirnov, who was picked by Putin to run Russia’s anti-doping commission, says McLaren’s report into systematic doping doesn’t pay enough attention to reforms which have been made since the scandal began and “it’s possible even to say that the McLaren report is out of date.” Smirnov adds that “since the time that is under discussion, Russia has changed greatly and made serious steps toward creating the most effective system in the world for fighting the evil of doping.” The McLaren report focuses largely on the periods leading up to the 2012 Olympics in London and 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. 4:30 p.m. IOC President Thomas Bach says Richard McLaren’s latest report on Russian doping “demonstrates a fundamental attack on the integrity of sport.” Bach says he believes any athlete or official involved in “such a sophisticated manipulation system” should be banned from the Olympics for life. He says the IOC, in cooperation with McLaren, will review all samples from Russian athletes who competed at the 2014 Sochi Winter Games. In addition, Bach says he extended the mandate of an IOC disciplinary commission to test samples of all Russian athletes who competed at the 2012 London Games. A separate IOC commission is looking into the system that organized the doping manipulation. 3:32 p.m. The head of Denmark’s anti-doping agency says Russia should be excluded from attending and organizing international competition “like the football World Cup” in 2018. Michael Ask of Anti-Doping Denmark says that if Russia “isn’t willing to change (its ways), then they have no place in the world of sports.” Niels Nygaard, president of the Danish sports confederation, says “clear rules for when and how whole organizations can be sanctioned” are needed to avoid “a situation like the one leading up to the Rio Games.” Before the Olympics, WADA called for Russia’s exclusion after investigator Richard McLaren released his first report into allegations of state-sponsored cheating and cover-ups in Russia. The IOC rejected the call, instead allowing international sports federations to decide which Russian athletes could compete. 3:30 p.m. The IOC will retest more than 250 doping samples from Russian athletes at the 2014 Sochi Winter Games and examine all Russian samples from the 2012 London Olympics. The IOC made the announcement Friday following the release of Richard McLaren’s latest report detailing systematic doping in Russia. The IOC says the findings “show that there was a fundamental attack on the integrity of the Olympic Games and on sport in general.” The International Olympic Committee has two separate commissions that will study McLaren’s findings and prepare “the appropriate sanctions and measures.” The IOC will reanalyze all 254 urine samples collected from Russians athletes in Sochi. All 63 blood samples have already been retested and they came back negative. The IOC says it will also examine all samples collected from Russian athletes in London. Some IOC retests have already been done, with 11 Russian athletes sanctioned. 2:30 p.m. The Russian Sports Ministry has denied that the country had any state-sponsored doping system. The ministry says it will examine a report into Russian doping before commenting in detail but that it insists on “the absence of a state program of support for doping sport” and “continues to fight doping with a position of zero tolerance.” World Anti-Doping Agency investigator Richard McLaren accused then-Sports Minister Vitaly Mutko of allowing a controlled state-backed doping scheme to be developed with his “leadership and knowledge” ahead of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. Mutko has since been promoted to Deputy Prime Minister, though his brief still includes sport, while the new sports minister is Pavel Kolobkov, who has not been accused of any wrongdoing. 2:05 p.m. The vice president of the Russian Olympic Committee says he is “looking positively” at the prospect of the country being allowed to compete at the 2018 Winter Olympics. World Anti-Doping Agency investigator Richard McLaren published a report Friday citing evidence that doping samples from 12 Russian medalists at the last Winter Olympics in Sochi were tampered with. Stanislav Pozdnyakov tells Russian state news agency R-Sport that the report contains “nothing new” and that Russian athletes “should train calmly for (the 2018 Olympics in) Pyeongchang together with their coaches,” adding that “I am looking positively at this prospect.” Pozdnyakov, a four-time Olympic gold medal fencer, is also head of fencing’s European governing body. 2 p.m. The next step in the Russian doping scandal is that dossiers on more than 1,000 athletes implicated in cover-ups will be handed to top sports officials for further disciplinary action. The World Anti-Doping Agency says investigator Richard McLaren and his team are compiling dossiers for each of the athletes referred to in McLaren’s report by code names alone. WADA says that “starting today,” it will pass dossiers identifying those athletes to the relevant international federations governing the sports in which those athletes compete. The federations will then decide “whether or not there are sufficient elements to pursue (doping disciplinary cases) or, whether further investigations are required.” Medal winners the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi are among those who could face potential disciplinary actions. 1:35 p.m. The head of the World Anti-Doping Agency says Richard McLaren’s report into Russian doping shows “institutionalized manipulation and cover up of the doping control process” in the country. WADA president Craig Reedie says in a statement that the agency is grateful to McLaren for the report, adding that it is “alarming to read that 1,000 Russian athletes … can be identified as being involved in, or benefiting from, manipulations to conceal positive doping tests.” WADA says it will continue working to reinstate the Russian anti-doping agency, which was suspended from carrying out tests last year after earlier accusations its staff covered up failed drug tests and colluded with athletes to arrange times for supposedly no-notice tests. However, WADA director general Oliver Niggli says there “remain a number of challenges that must be addressed” before the agency can be reinstated. 1 p.m. The International Ski Federation says it will “act decisively” and with zero tolerance against doping after studying the McLaren report. World Anti-Doping Agency investigator Richard McLaren says Russia’s state-backed doping program corrupted the 2014 Sochi Olympics, where the home team won medals in cross-country skiing, snowboarding and freestyle skiing. FIS, whose president Gian Franco Kasper is an IOC executive board member, says it will “coordinate with the IOC … and WADA, in order to address each organization’s next steps.” 12:40 p.m. The International Paralympic Committee says a report detailing mass cover-ups of doping by Russian officials is “unprecedented and astonishing.” The IPC, which barred Russia from competing in this year’s Paralympics over earlier doping allegations, says World Anti-Doping Agency investigator Richard McLaren’s findings “strike right at the heart of the integrity and ethics of sport.” McLaren’s report says that when Russia hosted the 2014 Winter Olympics, six Paralympic athletes had samples swapped or manipulated. Those athletes went on to win 21 medals. The IPC says its taskforce, headed by a former UK Anti-Doping chief executive, will work with the Russian Paralympic Committee to fix “the broken and compromised anti-doping system in Russia.” 12:35 p.m. The IAAF says it is retesting all Russian samples it has stored since the 2007 world championships, and has already found three positive doping tests from that year’s event in Osaka, Japan. Track’s governing body says more results are due next week from retesting of Russians who competed at the 2011 worlds in Daegu, South Korea. Doping investigator Richard McLaren says Russia operated a state-backed cheating system at the 2013 worlds in Moscow. McLaren says in his report he referred the cases of 33 Russian athletes to the IAAF. The IAAF says 53 percent of the elite athletes whose cases were shared by McLaren “have already been sanctioned or are currently undergoing disciplinary proceedings.” 12:05 p.m. A World Anti-Doping Agency investigation says Russia, backed by the government, corrupted the 2012 London Olympics on an “unprecedented scale.” Releasing a new report into systematic Russian doping, investigator Richard McLaren says “this corruption involved the on-going use of prohibited substances, washout testing and false reporting.” No Russian athlete tested positive for a prohibited substance at the London Games as the country collected 24 gold, 26 silver and 32 bronze medals. But McLaren says “the Russian Olympic team corrupted the London Games on an unprecedented scale, the extent of which will probably never be fully established. This corruption involved the ongoing use of prohibited substances, washout testing and false reporting.” According to McLaren, “the ministry of sport was working to discipline athletes in advance of the London Games into taking the cocktail of steroids … in order to beat the detection thresholds at the London lab.” 11:25 a.m. A new report into systematic Russian doping has found that more than 1,000 Russian athletes from summer and winter sports were involved in or benefited from an organized conspiracy over a four-year period. World Anti-Doping Agency investigator Richard McLaren released the second part of his report into allegations of state-sponsored doping, particularly involving the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. The findings confirmed and expanded on much of the evidence contained in the Canadian law professor’s first report issued in July. Among the new specifics, the report found evidence of tampering of doping samples involving 12 Russian medalists in Sochi. The number includes athletes who won four gold medals. The names were not given. 10:55 a.m. Pole vault great Yelena Isinbayeva says she will oppose blanket bans of Russian athletes after being named the head of the suspended Russian anti-doping agency’s new supervisory board. Isinbayeva was appointed chair of the 10-person board, which also includes a senior Russian Sports Ministry official, on Wednesday without consultation with the World Anti-Doping Agency. Isinbayeva, who missed this year’s Olympics when the Russian track and field team was banned, says “of course it’s in my interests not to allow the situation which I ended up in, so that our athletes from our country are treated the same as everyone else.” The agency was suspended last year over cover-up allegations and requires WADA certification to start carrying out doping tests again. 10 a.m. The Olympic world is bracing for more evidence of systematic Russian doping. World Anti-Doping Agency investigator Richard McLaren is releasing his latest report on Friday into allegations of state-sponsored cheating and cover-ups in Russia. The report is expected to focus on evidence of a doping conspiracy centered on the 2014 Sochi Winter Games, including details of the manipulation of doping samples. McLaren’s first report, issued in July, led WADA to call for Russia’s exclusion from the Rio de Janeiro Olympics. The IOC rejected the call, instead allowing international sports federations to decide which Russian athletes could compete. McLaren’s new report will be submitted to the International Olympic Committee, which has two separate commissions looking into the allegations. The IOC has said it will impose stiff sanctions on any athletes and officials implicated in doping.
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The Latest: Daily fantasy execs say legal war led to merger

The Latest: Daily fantasy execs say legal war led to merger

The Latest on the merger of daily fantasy sports companies DraftKings and FanDuel (all times local): 2:05 p.m. A top daily fantasy sports player says he’s watching closely how the merger of the nascent industry’s leading companies — DraftKings and FanDuel — might impact his livelihood. Saahil Sud, a 27-year-old Boston resident, says he’s concerned the newly formed company would have the clout to substantially raise fees on players. If the companies also merge their game platforms that could…
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Feisty race wraps up as voters prepare to elect Palmetto Bay vice mayor

Six months after it was narrowly approved by the Palmetto Bay Village Council, a development of 485 condos and a business complex on the old Burger King property has emerged as the main issue in a runoff election for vice mayor of the village. The candidates on Tuesday’s ballot are John DuBois, 54, the incumbent vice mayor and CEO of a cloud-based security surveillance company; and Erica Watts, 47, a former legal aid and PTA president. On Election Day, neither candidate got the majority vote,…
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Trump Supporter Says He Might Sue Starbucks over ‘White’ Discrimination

Florida man and Trump supporter David Sanguesa went viral on Wednesday when video showed him losing his temper at a Miami Starbucks. Now he’s threatening a lawsuit, saying he was given slow service because he voted for President-elect Donald Trump. Video captures Sanguesa losing his cool as he demanded a refund. “You’re trash,” he said, after having stepped into an employee area. “So what?” the woman said. “Because I voted for Trump,” he said. He demanded a barista’s name, an…
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Wynwood arts district becomes home to ‘irreverent’ law firm AXS

MIAMI – While most law firms base their operations out of regal-looking buildings at a city’s heart, Miami-based firm AXS Law Group has taken a different approach. AXS’ new space, decorated with murals by Andrew Antonaccio, ROA and Johnny Robles, is located at 2121 N.W. 2nd Ave in the main artery of Miami’s Wynwood arts district. Founding partner Jeremy Ben-David said in a statement that AXS’ office embodies the philosophy core to the firm’s approach to law: seasoned professionals …
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Oregon cities setting rules after opting in to legal pot

Some 30 counties and cities in Oregon approved some type of marijuana businesses in last week’s election, and officials in those communities now must establish rules for every step in the production and supply chain. When voters legalized recreational marijuana statewide two years ago, the communities — from the cowboy town of Pendleton to Sweet Home in the Willamette Valley — opted out. But many switched it up this month, voting to allow at least some form of the pot industry, including medical marijuana. “No one has done this in Oregon since liquor Prohibition,” said Scott Winkels, a lobbyist with the League of Oregon Cities. “This is the first time we’ve had to step in and develop and regulate a marketplace for a controlled substance since 1933.” Local officials must determine operating hours for marijuana retailers, growing farms and processors. They also were trying to figure out whether the businesses should be allowed near parks and what sort of security and odor controls the businesses must provide. The rule-setting also was happening in other states that have legalized recreational marijuana. In California, which approved pot last week, the San Jose City Council imposed a temporary ban — including on outdoor gardens — to give officials time to develop regulations for sales and farming. In Colorado, where voters passed marijuana in 2012, the rules were still being tweaked. This month, Denver became the first U.S. city to allow people to use marijuana in bars and restaurants, though state licensing officials announced a rule Friday that prohibits businesses with liquor licenses from allowing pot consumption on their premises. The move strikes a major blow to the voter-passed initiative. In Oregon, the Liquor Control Commission didn’t begin finalizing regulations and licensing businesses until this year. The communities that approved marijuana businesses on Election Day are now starting to look at regulations. “Most have been borrowing from each other,” said Rob Bovett, legal counsel of Association of Oregon Counties, describing efforts to establish ordinances. Opt-in ballot measures go into effect in January, Bovett said. If the jurisdictions want to reap the tax benefits at the earliest opportunity, they should have the regulations finalized before then so marijuana companies can seek licenses and start doing business, liquor commission spokesman Mark Pettinger said. The League of Oregon Cities has drawn up a guide to help struggling local officials. It says cities may impose restrictions on the hours of operation and the locations of producers, processors, wholesalers, as well as retailers and medical marijuana grow sites, processing sites and dispensaries. They may also regulate public access and how the businesses operate. “Probably most cities will use (the guide) as a template,” Winkels said. “The easiest way is to cut and paste the ordinance in … though some will probably be making local adjustments.” Robert Snyder, lawyer for the town of Sweet Home, said forming the rules is “going to take work” and that it will be up to the city council to decide whether to get public input. One marijuana ballot measure that passed last week imposed a 3 percent local sales tax on marijuana products, on top of a 17 percent state sales tax, Bovett said. Even counties and cities that decided to prohibit marijuana businesses hedged their bets by approving the additional tax so they can be prepared to impose it if voters eventually say yes to pot. “All (of Oregon’s) 111 cities and counties voted yes on the local tax,” Bovett said.
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Steinger, Iscoe & Greene Sponsors Rider for 2016 SMART Ride in Miami

Steinger, Iscoe & Greene Sponsors Rider for 2016 SMART Ride in Miami

Founding Partners Gary Iscoe (left) and MIchael Steinger (right) presenting SMART Ride check to employee, Jimmy Dejesus Steinger, Iscoe & Greene is excited to announce that they are sponsoring a rider in the 2016 SMART Ride, a two-day, 165-mile ride in South Florida to raise money and awareness for HIV/AIDS. The law firm has pledged $1,250 towards the ride, 100% of which will go to HIV/AIDS-related causes. Steinger, Iscoe & Greene is also extraordinarily proud to announce that the rider…
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Law School Classmates Call Priebus a ‘Voice of Reason’ for Trump White House

The University of Miami Law has a very diverse student body and Priebus got along with everybody, said Isani, whose father, a Muslim, immigrated to …
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Legal Academia Pioneer M. Minnette Massey Dies at 89

Professor Massey was a wonderful law professor. She was so bright, witty and engaged with her students. I feel fortunate that I was her student and later her friend. Rest in peace. Thank you….
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Human Resource Manager – Mid-size Miami Law Firm

If you truly enjoy the nuts and bolts of HR, read on!  We are a very professional, well managed, fast-paced Coral Gables law firm seeking an experienced hands -on HR generalist to join our respected team of attorneys and support staff. Our ideal candidate is able to expertly administer our comprehensive benefits package and process payroll in addition to other key HR initiatives.  All we are missing is you! You will be responsible for the full spectrum of an HR generalist including pa…
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Trump’s path on health care law intersects with a lawsuit

President-elect Donald Trump says he wants to preserve health insurance coverage even as he pursues repeal of the Obama-era overhaul that provided it to millions of uninsured people. How his administration handles a pending lawsuit over billions of dollars in insurance subsidies will reveal whether Trump wants an orderly transition to a Republican-designed system or if he’d push “Obamacare” over a cliff. Stripping away the subsidies at issue in the case would put the program into a fr…
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They took a break from work. But things have changed so much, they're getting some help

They took a break from work. But things have changed so much, they’re getting some help

Gloria Samayoa at SapientNitro’s Miami office has been sifting through résumés as the New York-based digital marketing agency expands its new career return program to her office. The 12-week paid program for advertising professionals, which piloted in New York and Toronto, has spread to Chicago, Atlanta and London. It has led to full-time positions in some of those cities for people — particularly stay-at-home mothers — who had taken time off work and wanted to return. In Miami, Samayoa…
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Could Shipping Container Homes Help Solve Miami’s Affordable Housing Crisis?

The wiring in Berlinda Faye Dixon’s Overtown apartment building was all wrong, but the landlord refused to fix it. And when the complex eventually caught fire, he refused to repair the damage too. She lived in a smoked-out building for weeks before she was eventually able to obtain affordable housing. Around 150 families are in similar situations in Miami. Unable to afford higher rent, they live in buildings wallowing in disrepair. The city is trying to help by taking legal action against landl…
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NCAA faces seven more concussion-related class actions

NCAA faces seven more concussion-related class actions

INDIANAPOLIS (Legal Newsline) – Just as football season was preparing to kick off, the National Collegiate Athletic Association got hit with another round of lawsuits related to concussions student-athletes endured while engaging in collegiate sports. The seven class action suits, all filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana, bring the count against the NCAA to 22 pending concussion-related cases. The previous batch of class action cases were filed as late as May…
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Louisiana governor sues AG over anti-discrimination clause

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards sued the state attorney general Friday for rejecting contracts with an anti-discrimination clause that would protect LGBT people, language the governor ordered to be included in nearly all state contracts. “I believe he’s on the wrong side of the law and on the wrong side of history on this particular issue,” the Democratic governor said of Republican Attorney General Jeff Landry. Landry has refused to let state agencies hire outside lawyers if the agre…
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APNewsBreak: Attorneys general cast doubt on Utah land push

A new legal analysis from a group of Western attorneys general casts doubt on many of the arguments Utah has put forward in its push to gain control of millions of acres of federal land. The report, based on two years of work , doesn’t address every argument Utah has floated, but it points out decisions by the Supreme Court and other federal courts that could put Utah on shaky ground if it sues the U.S. government for control. The analysis was drafted by lawyers from seven Republican attorneys …
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Zarco Einhorn Books Floor at One Biscayne Tower

Zarco Einhorn Books Floor at One Biscayne Tower

The founding partner of Zarco Einhorn Salkowski & Brito began his legal career at One Biscayne Tower in downtown Miami, and now his firm is …
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County’s idea for drug addicts: You OD, we bust you, you go to jail for 72 hours

Drug users who overdose on narcotics would face jail time and mandatory treatment for substance abuse under new legal action proposed Monday by County Council Chairman Mark Lazarus. Lazarus asked the county legal team, police and sheriff’s office to determine what laws need to be passed to mandate a 72-hour holding period in jail, citing the growing number of heroin use and repeat overdoses emergency officials are experiencing. “There’s no consequences for those people that are overdosing…
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Office Services Clerk Needed for Growing Miami Law Firm (Miami)

Pacin Levine, P.A. is a rapidly expanding South Florida Law Firm focusing in … We are seeking a Full-Time Office Services Clerk for its Miami location.
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Skimmer, Trafficking Laws Hit Books Saturday

Follow CBSMIAMI.COM: Facebook | Twitter TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – County elections supervisors are up for pay raises, while penalties increase for trafficking in the modern version of food stamps and for stealing credit-card information at gas pumps, under new laws that go into effect Saturday. Those changes to state laws are among 26 that take effect this weekend after being crafted during the 2016 legislative session. Lawmakers sent 272 bills to Gov. Rick Scott from the regular legisl…
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Lawsuit: Georgia voter registration process violates the law

Lawsuit: Georgia voter registration process violates the law

Georgia’s voter registration process violates the Voting Rights Act and has prevented tens of thousands of residents, mostly minorities, from registering to vote, according to a federal lawsuit filed Wednesday. Under a policy implemented in 2010, people aren’t added to voter rolls if identifying information on their applications doesn’t exactly match information in databases maintained by the Georgia Department of Driver Services or the Social Security Administration, the lawsuit says. “Wh…
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Junior Litigation Legal Secretary Needed for Miami Based Law Firm

Junior Litigation Legal Secretary Needed for Miami Based Law Firm (Miami, Florida) Pacin Levine, P.A. is a rapidly expanding South Florida Law Firm …
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SEC, city of Miami lay out final arguments in bond case

By Zachary Fagenson MIAMI (Reuters) – The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the city of Miami squared off in Florida federal court on Tuesday, with the regulator accusing city officials of playing a financial shell game to cut costs on a $150 million municipal bond sale in 2009. In a 2013 complaint, the SEC alleged that the city and Miami’s former budget director, Michael Boudreaux, violated the anti-fraud provisions of federal securities law. Both the city and Boudreaux denied any wr…
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French unions stage last-ditch resistance against labor law

With strikes and protests, French unions are staging a last-ditch bid to dismantle a labor law that weakens their powers and worker protections. However the labor action appeared low-key Thursday morning, with only minimal disruption to schools, transport and other public services. The civil aviation authority said 15 percent of flights were cancelled at Paris area airports. A protest is planned through Paris later. Unions are protesting a labor law adopted this summer that allows longer workwe…
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Syria cease-fire deal rife with legal, liability questions

The deal crafted by the U.S. and Russia to halt the Syrian civil war and focus efforts on rooting out extremists is rife with legal and liability questions that are fueling Pentagon skepticism about military cooperation between the two powers, senior U.S. officials said. The first hurdle is that Congress has enacted a law prohibiting any military cooperation with Moscow in the wake of Russia’s annexation of the Crimea region of Ukraine. That means the deal that Secretary of State John Kerry and…
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JPMorgan's Lending Practices under Miami Legal Scanner – Analyst Blog

JPMorgan's Lending Practices under Miami Legal Scanner – Analyst Blog

Recently, Miami became the second U.S. city to sue JPMorgan Chase & Co. ( JPM ) over its discriminatory lending practices. Last month, the bank was …
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Court: Red light cameras pre-2010 were illegal

The 3rd District Court of Appeal in Miami, however, upheld red light camera fines collected in Aventura before the new law was passed. While Downs …
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Gay rights group endorses Charlie Crist

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. … officials made the announcement at a visitors center for gays and lesbians in Miami Beach, citing Crist's current support for same-sex marriage and ongoing legal efforts to overturn the state's ban on the unions.
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Jury deliberating in 2nd Taylor slaying trial

Jury deliberating in 2nd Taylor slaying trial

AP Legal Affairs WriterJune 10, 2014 Updated 60 minutes ago … MIAMI — A South Florida jury has begun deliberations in the trial of a second man …
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Ex-partner of Fla. Ponzi schemer to plead guilty

MIAMI — A former partner of convicted Ponzi schemer Scott Rothstein in a now-defunct South Florida law firm is set to plead guilty to conspiracy.
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Jury convicts suspect in Sean Taylor slaying trial

AP Legal Affairs WriterJune 10, 2014 Updated 6 minutes ago … MIAMI — A man identified by prosecutors as the greedy organizer of a bungled 2007 …
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