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Cooper seeks temporary block of Cabinet confirmation law

Cooper seeks temporary block of Cabinet confirmation law

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper is returning to court to try to prevent his Cabinet secretaries from being subjected to confirmation hearings starting this week that he argues are unconstitutional. Cooper’s outside lawyers asked a three-judge panel late Monday to temporarily block enforcement of the law directing his department heads be subject to the “advice and consent” of a majority of senators. Cooper spokesman Ford Porter said the hearing on the motion was expected Tuesday, a day …
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SPLC, advocates urge Miami-Dade to resist Trump over immigration enforcement

The SPLC and a broad coalition of advocates and legal scholars today urged Florida’s Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners to uphold a …
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ACLU: Miami-Dade mayor “duped” by President Trump on immigration detentions

Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez misread the law and the risk of losing federal aid when he tried to appease President Donald Trump by ordering local jails to detain inmates sought by immigration agents, a coalition of liberal advocacy groups wrote in a letter to county commissioners on Monday. “The County should not give in to President Trump’s bluster,” read the 10-page letter signed by local leaders of the American Civil Liberties Union, Service Employees International Union, Southern P…
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ACLU On Miami-Dade Mayor’s Immigration Decision: ‘County Is Going To Be Sued’

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Previously, Miami-Dade County held arrested immigrants if the feds asked, but only if they were charged with a serious, violent offense. People have taken to the streets protesting Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez’s decision to detain any immigrant who comes into the county jail system if immigration asks, even those charged with petty offenses. Now, the American Civil Liberties Union is urging citizens to call their county commissioners and lobby them to overturn the …
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Tennessee online sales tax rule draws legal challenge

Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday that the state’s move to require all major online vendors to collect sales taxes on purchases made in Tennessee has drawn a legal challenge. Under current federal law, online retailers can only be required to collect sales taxes if they have a physical presence in the state such as a store or office there. Consumers ordering from out-of-state retailers are technically required to pay the tax to the state Revenue Department, but few do. Haslam’s tax rule seeks to ext…
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Trump's immigration order faces mounting legal questions

Trump’s immigration order faces mounting legal questions

The legal fight over President Donald Trump’s ban on refugees is likely to turn on questions of a president’s authority to control America’s borders and on whether the new immigration policy unconstitutionally discriminates against Muslims. Civil liberties advocates have challenged the order, which temporarily suspends immigration from seven countries and the United States’ broader refugee program. It has drawn nationwide protests since the order was issued on Friday. Federal judges in New York…
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Universities urging international students, faculty to avoid…

CORAL GABLES, Fla. – University of Miami law student Niki Namezi was one of hundreds of students who packed into a lecture hall on Monday to listen to Muneer Ahamd, a Yale professor, speak about President Donald Trump’s executive order that calls for a travel ban directed at seven Muslim-majority nations. The order has caused confusion as some remain unclear as to how it affects U.S. green card holders.  Officials have said that green card holders who are returning to the U.S. wil…
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Justices to hear free speech clash over offensive trademarks

Justices to hear free speech clash over offensive trademarks

In a First Amendment clash over a law barring offensive trademarks, the Supreme Court on Wednesday raised doubts about a government program that favors some forms of speech but rejects others that might disparage certain groups. The justices heard arguments in a dispute involving an Asian-American band called the Slants that was denied a trademark because the U.S. Patent and Trademark office said the name is offensive to Asians. Justice Elena Kagan reflected the concerns of several justices when she said government programs are not supposed to make a distinction based on viewpoint. “The point is that I can say good things about something, but I can’t say bad things about something,” she said. “And I would have thought that that was a fairly classic case of viewpoint discrimination.” The Oregon-based band says the 70-year-old law violates free-speech rights. A federal appeals court had ruled that the law is unconstitutional, but the government appealed. A victory for the band would be welcome news for the Washington Redskins, embroiled in their own legal fight over the team’s name. The trademark office canceled the football team’s lucrative trademarks in 2014 after finding the word “Redskins” is disparaging to Native Americans. But the justices also seemed concerned that imposing absolutely no limits on trademark names might go too far. At issue is a law that prohibits registration of marks that “may disparage … persons, living or dead, institutions, beliefs or national symbols.” A trademark confers certain legal benefits, including the power to sue competitors that infringe upon the trademark. Slants founder Simon Tam says his goal was to reclaim a derisive slur and transform it into a badge of ethnic pride. But the trademark office said a term can be disparaging even when used in a positive light. A federal appeals court sided with the band, ruling that the law violates the First Amendment. The Obama administration wants the high court to overturn that ruling. Justice Department lawyer Malcolm Stewart told the justices that the law does not restrict speech because the band is still free to use the name even without trademark protection. Stewart said the government was concerned about allowing trademarks for racial slurs, religious insults and the “vilest racial epithets” that distract consumers and hinder commerce. Justice Stephen Breyer wasn’t impressed, saying he could think of “perhaps 50,000 examples of instances where the space the trademark provides is used for very distracting messages.” “What business does Congress have picking out this one, but letting all the other distractions exist?” Breyer asked. Justice Anthony Kennedy compared the trademark program to copyrights, noting that the government can’t bar disparaging copyrights. “We have a culture in which we have tee shirts and logos and rock bands and so forth that are expressing a point of view,” Kennedy said. “They are using the market to express views.” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said the law wasn’t being enforced consistently, noting that the term “Heeb” was approved in one trademark application, but not in another. The term is considered offensive to Jews. John Connell, attorney for the Slants’ founder, said the First Amendment should allow trademark approval of virtually any expression without limits. But some justices seemed to think his argument went too far. The trademark law, for example, places restrictions on words that are libelous or cause confusion in the marketplace. “You want us to say that trademark law is just like a public park” where people can say whatever they want, Kennedy told Connell. “Good-bye. That’s it. That’s your argument.” Justice Sonia Sotomayor wondered about libelous trademarks. What if someone tried to register “Trump is a thief” before the president-elect became a public figure, she asked. Connell said that should be allowed. “That makes no sense,” Sotomayor said. Breyer noted that the Slants are free to use their name in all kinds of ways, just not in the trademark itself. “This is not a general expression program,” Breyer said. “It stops nobody from saying anything.” Like the Slants, the Redskins say their name is meant to honor American Indians. But the team has spent years fighting legal challenges from Native American groups that say it’s a racial slur. A federal judge upheld the trademark office’s cancellation of the name and the team is appealing. The matter is on hold pending the outcome of the Slants case. A ruling in that case is expected by the end of June.
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School voucher program survives teacher union’s attempt to kill it

Florida’s teachers union struck out Wednesday in its latest effort to dismantle a tax credit scholarship program as the state’s Supreme Court rejected the union’s appeal for legal standing to challenge the voucher-like program that finances students from low-performing schools who want to attend private schools. The Florida Education Association and other plaintiffs, including the NAACP, allege the scholarships are unconstitutional because the program diverts money that would otherwise go…
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Grant to Miami Firm Will Fund Legal Program at Middle School

Miami law firm Hamilton, Miller & Birthisel was awarded a $100,000 grant to help fund a mock courtroom and a legal curriculum at Brownsville Middle …
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Enough: Negotiate a settlement with the 9/11 masterminds

As the surviving spouse of a 9/11 murder victim, Sareve Dukat, I want closure. I was an observer at the Guantánamo military commission pretrial hearings of the five defendants in the 9/11 hijackings and mass murder litigation in February 2015. Having listened to the litany of legal maneuvering, and having followed the proceedings for almost two years since I was there, the posturing continues ad nauseam. The proceedings are elaborate performances that have little to do with guilt or innocence….
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Justices raise doubts over law barring offensive trademarks

In a First Amendment clash over a law barring offensive trademarks, the Supreme Court on Wednesday raised doubts about a government program that favors some forms of speech but rejects others that might disparage certain groups. The justices heard arguments in a dispute involving an Asian-American band called the Slants that was denied a trademark because the U.S. Patent and Trademark office said the name is offensive to Asians. Justice Elena Kagan reflected the concerns of several justices when she said government programs are not supposed to make a distinction based on viewpoint. “The point is that I can say good things about something, but I can’t say bad things about something,” she said. “And I would have thought that that was a fairly classic case of viewpoint discrimination.” The Oregon-based band says the 70-year-old law violates free-speech rights. A federal appeals court had ruled that the law is unconstitutional, but the government appealed. A victory for the band would be welcome news for the Washington Redskins, embroiled in their own legal fight over the team’s name. The trademark office canceled the football team’s lucrative trademarks in 2014 after finding the word “Redskins” is disparaging to Native Americans. But the justices also seemed concerned that imposing absolutely no limits on trademark names might go too far. At issue is a law that prohibits registration of marks that “may disparage … persons, living or dead, institutions, beliefs or national symbols.” A trademark confers certain legal benefits, including the power to sue competitors that infringe upon the trademark. Slants founder Simon Tam says his goal was to reclaim a derisive slur and transform it into a badge of ethnic pride. But the trademark office said a term can be disparaging even when used in a positive light. A federal appeals court sided with the band, ruling that the law violates the First Amendment. The Obama administration wants the high court to overturn that ruling. Justice Department lawyer Malcolm Stewart told the justices that the law does not restrict speech because the band is still free to use the name even without trademark protection. Stewart said the government was concerned about allowing trademarks for racial slurs, religious insults and the “vilest racial epithets” that distract consumers and hinder commerce. Justice Stephen Breyer wasn’t impressed, saying he could think of “perhaps 50,000 examples of instances where the space the trademark provides is used for very distracting messages.” “What business does Congress have picking out this one, but letting all the other distractions exist?” Breyer asked. Justice Anthony Kennedy compared the trademark program to copyrights, noting that the government can’t bar disparaging copyrights. “We have a culture in which we have tee shirts and logos and rock bands and so forth that are expressing a point of view,” Kennedy said. “They are using the market to express views.” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said the law wasn’t being enforced consistently, noting that the term “Heeb” was approved in one trademark application, but not in another. The term is considered offensive to Jews. John Connell, attorney for the Slants’ founder, said the First Amendment should allow trademark approval of virtually any expression without limits. But some justices seemed to think his argument went too far. The trademark law, for example, places restrictions on words that are libelous or cause confusion in the marketplace. “You want us to say that trademark law is just like a public park” where people can say whatever they want, Kennedy told Connell. “Good-bye. That’s it. That’s your argument.” Justice Sonia Sotomayor wondered about libelous trademarks. What if someone tried to register “Trump is a thief” before the president-elect became a public figure, she asked. Connell said that should be allowed. “That makes no sense,” Sotomayor said. Breyer noted that the Slants are free to use their name in all kinds of ways, just not in the trademark itself. “This is not a general expression program,” Breyer said. “It stops nobody from saying anything.” Like the Slants, the Redskins say their name is meant to honor American Indians. But the team has spent years fighting legal challenges from Native American groups that say it’s a racial slur. A federal judge upheld the trademark office’s cancellation of the name and the team is appealing. The matter is on hold pending the outcome of the Slants case. A ruling in that case is expected by the end of June.
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US/Cuba Interior Ministry Sign Law Enforcement Deal

US/Cuba Interior Ministry Sign Law Enforcement Deal

Follow CBSMIAMI.COM: Facebook | Twitter HAVANA (CBSmiami/AP) — Despite objections by Republicans who feel that the U.S. should limit its dealings with the regime of Cuban leader Raul Castro, the Obama administration and Cuba’s Interior Ministry have agreed to share information on international criminal activity such as terrorism, human trafficking and money laundering. The State Department signed the memorandum of understanding Monday with the Cuban Interior Ministry, which is responsib…
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Bikers Race Through Streets For “Wheels Up, Guns Down” Amid Crackdown

Follow CBSMIAMI.COM: Facebook | Twitter MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Motorcycles, ATVs, and dirt bikes flooded the streets and highways of South Florida Monday afternoon and night, performing reckless wheelies and weaving in and out of traffic. The annual Martin Luther King Day “Wheels Up, Guns Down” motorized madness saw people hurt and killed. Motorcyclists could be seen speeding through the streets of Miami around 2:3o p.m.  They made their way up I-95 through Miami, and west into Opa …
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Knights of Malta insist ouster over condom scandal was legal

The head of the embattled Knights of Malta is seeking to discredit a Vatican investigation into the removal of a top official over a condom scandal, insisting that he followed the rules in the dismissal. In the latest development in the remarkable showdown between the ancient Catholic lay order and the Holy See, Fra’ Matthew Festing explained and defended his actions in a Jan. 14 letter to the Knights’ membership. “Suffice it to say, whilst I was trying to enjoy a peaceful Advent and Chris…
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Report: Airport Officials Detain Cubans with Legal Visas in ‘Wet Foot/Dry Foot’ Chaos

“These Cuban travelers have tourism visas. They are being detained or deported,” Ramón Saúl Sánchez, the head of Miami’s Democracy Movement advocacy group, told Miami’s El Nuevo Herald over the weekend. “Those being detained within the airport include people of advanced age, including one blind man, many of them ill,” he added. He also said those detained told him they were told they would be forced into a detention center for weeks. Luis Felipe Rojas, th…
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US, Cuban Interior Ministry sign law-enforcement deal

The Obama administration and Cuba’s Interior Ministry have agreed to share information on international criminal activity such as terrorism, human trafficking and money laundering despite Republican objections to U.S. law-enforcement cooperation with President Raul Castro’s government. The State Department signed the memorandum of understanding Monday with the Cuban Interior Ministry, which is responsible for internal security in Cuba, including crackdowns on political dissidents. The signing i…
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Miami Law Launches Black Lives Matter Interdisciplinary Course

Miami Law Launches Black Lives Matter Interdisciplinary Course

The University of Miami School of Law is entering the important national debate on the state of racial justice in the United States. In Spring 2017, the School of Law will be convening an interdisciplinary course called “Race, Class, and Power: University Course on Ferguson and the #BlackLivesMatter Movement.”  The course will engage the multiple lenses through which Ferguson, the Black Lives Matter movement, and racial justice in the U.S. might be explored. It includes examining issues …
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REAL ESTATE PARALEGAL FOR MIAMI LAW FIRM!

Robert Half once again was named to FORTUNE® magazine’s list of “World’s Most Admired Companies” and was the highest-ranked staffing firm. (March 1, 2016) In 2016, Robert Half was named a Top Corporation for Women’s Business Enterprises by WBENC, the nation’s leader in women’s business development. © 2017 Robert Half International Inc. An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/Disability/Veterans….
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The Latest: Los Angeles plans $10M for immigrant legal aid

The Latest: Los Angeles plans $10M for immigrant legal aid

The Latest on local government legal services funds for immigrants facing deportation (all times local): 12:15 a.m. Los Angeles elected officials and community leaders say they are setting up a $10 million fund to provide legal services to immigrants facing deportation in the wake of Donald Trump’s election. Mayor Eric Garcetti’s office said Monday about half the money will come from public funds and about half from private foundations. It was not immediately clear how the funds will be allocat…
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New law will speed recovery of art lost to Nazi looting

New law will speed recovery of art lost to Nazi looting

Heirs trying to recover artwork lost to Nazi looting during World War II will get some help from legislation signed Friday by President Barack Obama. The legislation will extend statutes of limitations for the recovery of that art so the heirs can have their day in court. In recent years, courts have sided with several museums on the issue and blocked family members who believe the art is theirs. “The systematic theft of property by the Nazis during the Holocaust robbed victims and their f…
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Two Attorneys Join Kelley Kronenberg’s Miami Office

While in law school, she was a member on the Thurgood Marshall Mock Trial Competition and served as a Legal Intern with the Miami-Dade State …
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Stormier times for California’s water expected under new law

The first winter storm of 2017 to drop welcome rain over the rivers, pumps, pipes and canals that move California’s water north to south likely will open a new era of tension over how much water goes to fish or farms under a new U.S law. Legislation signed Friday by President Barack Obama dictates that the federal portion of California’s heavily engineered water systems gives agricultural districts and other human users the biggest possible share of the most fought-over resource in a state with…
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The Latest: Mutko says Russia will resort to legal action

The Latest: Mutko says Russia will resort to legal action

The Latest on the Russian doping report (all times local): — 6:30 p.m. Russian Deputy Prime Minister Vitaly Mutko says Russia will resort to legal action in response to allegations of institutionalized doping. Mutko, who was sports minister for the 2012 and 2014 Olympics, the main period covered by the WADA report, tells the Tass state news agency “now we need to calmly move into the legal arena, which is what will be done.” It is not immediately clear what course any legal action might take. Mutko also argues it would not have been possible for Russia to try to cover up doping on such a large scale at the 2014 Olympics in Sochi, saying that because athletes were also tested at competitions outside Russia, “it was simply not realistic in Sochi to do what they are accusing us of.” 5:35 p.m. Travis Tygart, the CEO of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, calls the latest revelations from the McLaren report “another staggering example of how the Olympic movement has been corrupted and clean athletes robbed by Russia’s state-supported doping system.” Tygart is calling on the IOC to suspend Russia’s Olympic committee until it is deemed code compliant. He also says no international sporting events should be held in Russia until the country’s anti-doping program becomes code compliant and all those who participated in the corruption are held accountable. 5 p.m. UEFA says Russian Deputy Prime Minister Vitaly Mutko has begun the process of a FIFA integrity check to be an election candidate in April. Mutko has been elected by European soccer leaders since 2009 to represent them on FIFA’s ruling committee. Now, Mutko is seeking re-election amid widespread evidence detailed by Canadian investigator Richard McLaren that he oversaw a state-backed doping program as sports minister. In July, the World Anti-Doping Agency called on the FIFA ethics committee to investigate Mutko based on McLaren’s interim report. UEFA says Mutko is among five applicants for four vacant seats in an April 5 election of 55 European member federations. Mutko and his four rivals must pass an eligibility check by a FIFA panel to be formally accepted as candidates. Mutko also chairs the 2018 World Cup organizing committee. 4:35 p.m. A veteran Olympic official nominated by Russian President Vladimir Putin to lead the country’s anti-doping fight says Richard McLaren’s latest report is out of date. Vitaly Smirnov, who was picked by Putin to run Russia’s anti-doping commission, says McLaren’s report into systematic doping doesn’t pay enough attention to reforms which have been made since the scandal began and “it’s possible even to say that the McLaren report is out of date.” Smirnov adds that “since the time that is under discussion, Russia has changed greatly and made serious steps toward creating the most effective system in the world for fighting the evil of doping.” The McLaren report focuses largely on the periods leading up to the 2012 Olympics in London and 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. 4:30 p.m. IOC President Thomas Bach says Richard McLaren’s latest report on Russian doping “demonstrates a fundamental attack on the integrity of sport.” Bach says he believes any athlete or official involved in “such a sophisticated manipulation system” should be banned from the Olympics for life. He says the IOC, in cooperation with McLaren, will review all samples from Russian athletes who competed at the 2014 Sochi Winter Games. In addition, Bach says he extended the mandate of an IOC disciplinary commission to test samples of all Russian athletes who competed at the 2012 London Games. A separate IOC commission is looking into the system that organized the doping manipulation. 3:32 p.m. The head of Denmark’s anti-doping agency says Russia should be excluded from attending and organizing international competition “like the football World Cup” in 2018. Michael Ask of Anti-Doping Denmark says that if Russia “isn’t willing to change (its ways), then they have no place in the world of sports.” Niels Nygaard, president of the Danish sports confederation, says “clear rules for when and how whole organizations can be sanctioned” are needed to avoid “a situation like the one leading up to the Rio Games.” Before the Olympics, WADA called for Russia’s exclusion after investigator Richard McLaren released his first report into allegations of state-sponsored cheating and cover-ups in Russia. The IOC rejected the call, instead allowing international sports federations to decide which Russian athletes could compete. 3:30 p.m. The IOC will retest more than 250 doping samples from Russian athletes at the 2014 Sochi Winter Games and examine all Russian samples from the 2012 London Olympics. The IOC made the announcement Friday following the release of Richard McLaren’s latest report detailing systematic doping in Russia. The IOC says the findings “show that there was a fundamental attack on the integrity of the Olympic Games and on sport in general.” The International Olympic Committee has two separate commissions that will study McLaren’s findings and prepare “the appropriate sanctions and measures.” The IOC will reanalyze all 254 urine samples collected from Russians athletes in Sochi. All 63 blood samples have already been retested and they came back negative. The IOC says it will also examine all samples collected from Russian athletes in London. Some IOC retests have already been done, with 11 Russian athletes sanctioned. 2:30 p.m. The Russian Sports Ministry has denied that the country had any state-sponsored doping system. The ministry says it will examine a report into Russian doping before commenting in detail but that it insists on “the absence of a state program of support for doping sport” and “continues to fight doping with a position of zero tolerance.” World Anti-Doping Agency investigator Richard McLaren accused then-Sports Minister Vitaly Mutko of allowing a controlled state-backed doping scheme to be developed with his “leadership and knowledge” ahead of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. Mutko has since been promoted to Deputy Prime Minister, though his brief still includes sport, while the new sports minister is Pavel Kolobkov, who has not been accused of any wrongdoing. 2:05 p.m. The vice president of the Russian Olympic Committee says he is “looking positively” at the prospect of the country being allowed to compete at the 2018 Winter Olympics. World Anti-Doping Agency investigator Richard McLaren published a report Friday citing evidence that doping samples from 12 Russian medalists at the last Winter Olympics in Sochi were tampered with. Stanislav Pozdnyakov tells Russian state news agency R-Sport that the report contains “nothing new” and that Russian athletes “should train calmly for (the 2018 Olympics in) Pyeongchang together with their coaches,” adding that “I am looking positively at this prospect.” Pozdnyakov, a four-time Olympic gold medal fencer, is also head of fencing’s European governing body. 2 p.m. The next step in the Russian doping scandal is that dossiers on more than 1,000 athletes implicated in cover-ups will be handed to top sports officials for further disciplinary action. The World Anti-Doping Agency says investigator Richard McLaren and his team are compiling dossiers for each of the athletes referred to in McLaren’s report by code names alone. WADA says that “starting today,” it will pass dossiers identifying those athletes to the relevant international federations governing the sports in which those athletes compete. The federations will then decide “whether or not there are sufficient elements to pursue (doping disciplinary cases) or, whether further investigations are required.” Medal winners the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi are among those who could face potential disciplinary actions. 1:35 p.m. The head of the World Anti-Doping Agency says Richard McLaren’s report into Russian doping shows “institutionalized manipulation and cover up of the doping control process” in the country. WADA president Craig Reedie says in a statement that the agency is grateful to McLaren for the report, adding that it is “alarming to read that 1,000 Russian athletes … can be identified as being involved in, or benefiting from, manipulations to conceal positive doping tests.” WADA says it will continue working to reinstate the Russian anti-doping agency, which was suspended from carrying out tests last year after earlier accusations its staff covered up failed drug tests and colluded with athletes to arrange times for supposedly no-notice tests. However, WADA director general Oliver Niggli says there “remain a number of challenges that must be addressed” before the agency can be reinstated. 1 p.m. The International Ski Federation says it will “act decisively” and with zero tolerance against doping after studying the McLaren report. World Anti-Doping Agency investigator Richard McLaren says Russia’s state-backed doping program corrupted the 2014 Sochi Olympics, where the home team won medals in cross-country skiing, snowboarding and freestyle skiing. FIS, whose president Gian Franco Kasper is an IOC executive board member, says it will “coordinate with the IOC … and WADA, in order to address each organization’s next steps.” 12:40 p.m. The International Paralympic Committee says a report detailing mass cover-ups of doping by Russian officials is “unprecedented and astonishing.” The IPC, which barred Russia from competing in this year’s Paralympics over earlier doping allegations, says World Anti-Doping Agency investigator Richard McLaren’s findings “strike right at the heart of the integrity and ethics of sport.” McLaren’s report says that when Russia hosted the 2014 Winter Olympics, six Paralympic athletes had samples swapped or manipulated. Those athletes went on to win 21 medals. The IPC says its taskforce, headed by a former UK Anti-Doping chief executive, will work with the Russian Paralympic Committee to fix “the broken and compromised anti-doping system in Russia.” 12:35 p.m. The IAAF says it is retesting all Russian samples it has stored since the 2007 world championships, and has already found three positive doping tests from that year’s event in Osaka, Japan. Track’s governing body says more results are due next week from retesting of Russians who competed at the 2011 worlds in Daegu, South Korea. Doping investigator Richard McLaren says Russia operated a state-backed cheating system at the 2013 worlds in Moscow. McLaren says in his report he referred the cases of 33 Russian athletes to the IAAF. The IAAF says 53 percent of the elite athletes whose cases were shared by McLaren “have already been sanctioned or are currently undergoing disciplinary proceedings.” 12:05 p.m. A World Anti-Doping Agency investigation says Russia, backed by the government, corrupted the 2012 London Olympics on an “unprecedented scale.” Releasing a new report into systematic Russian doping, investigator Richard McLaren says “this corruption involved the on-going use of prohibited substances, washout testing and false reporting.” No Russian athlete tested positive for a prohibited substance at the London Games as the country collected 24 gold, 26 silver and 32 bronze medals. But McLaren says “the Russian Olympic team corrupted the London Games on an unprecedented scale, the extent of which will probably never be fully established. This corruption involved the ongoing use of prohibited substances, washout testing and false reporting.” According to McLaren, “the ministry of sport was working to discipline athletes in advance of the London Games into taking the cocktail of steroids … in order to beat the detection thresholds at the London lab.” 11:25 a.m. A new report into systematic Russian doping has found that more than 1,000 Russian athletes from summer and winter sports were involved in or benefited from an organized conspiracy over a four-year period. World Anti-Doping Agency investigator Richard McLaren released the second part of his report into allegations of state-sponsored doping, particularly involving the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. The findings confirmed and expanded on much of the evidence contained in the Canadian law professor’s first report issued in July. Among the new specifics, the report found evidence of tampering of doping samples involving 12 Russian medalists in Sochi. The number includes athletes who won four gold medals. The names were not given. 10:55 a.m. Pole vault great Yelena Isinbayeva says she will oppose blanket bans of Russian athletes after being named the head of the suspended Russian anti-doping agency’s new supervisory board. Isinbayeva was appointed chair of the 10-person board, which also includes a senior Russian Sports Ministry official, on Wednesday without consultation with the World Anti-Doping Agency. Isinbayeva, who missed this year’s Olympics when the Russian track and field team was banned, says “of course it’s in my interests not to allow the situation which I ended up in, so that our athletes from our country are treated the same as everyone else.” The agency was suspended last year over cover-up allegations and requires WADA certification to start carrying out doping tests again. 10 a.m. The Olympic world is bracing for more evidence of systematic Russian doping. World Anti-Doping Agency investigator Richard McLaren is releasing his latest report on Friday into allegations of state-sponsored cheating and cover-ups in Russia. The report is expected to focus on evidence of a doping conspiracy centered on the 2014 Sochi Winter Games, including details of the manipulation of doping samples. McLaren’s first report, issued in July, led WADA to call for Russia’s exclusion from the Rio de Janeiro Olympics. The IOC rejected the call, instead allowing international sports federations to decide which Russian athletes could compete. McLaren’s new report will be submitted to the International Olympic Committee, which has two separate commissions looking into the allegations. The IOC has said it will impose stiff sanctions on any athletes and officials implicated in doping.
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The Latest: Daily fantasy execs say legal war led to merger

The Latest: Daily fantasy execs say legal war led to merger

The Latest on the merger of daily fantasy sports companies DraftKings and FanDuel (all times local): 2:05 p.m. A top daily fantasy sports player says he’s watching closely how the merger of the nascent industry’s leading companies — DraftKings and FanDuel — might impact his livelihood. Saahil Sud, a 27-year-old Boston resident, says he’s concerned the newly formed company would have the clout to substantially raise fees on players. If the companies also merge their game platforms that could…
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Feisty race wraps up as voters prepare to elect Palmetto Bay vice mayor

Six months after it was narrowly approved by the Palmetto Bay Village Council, a development of 485 condos and a business complex on the old Burger King property has emerged as the main issue in a runoff election for vice mayor of the village. The candidates on Tuesday’s ballot are John DuBois, 54, the incumbent vice mayor and CEO of a cloud-based security surveillance company; and Erica Watts, 47, a former legal aid and PTA president. On Election Day, neither candidate got the majority vote,…
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Trump Supporter Says He Might Sue Starbucks over ‘White’ Discrimination

Florida man and Trump supporter David Sanguesa went viral on Wednesday when video showed him losing his temper at a Miami Starbucks. Now he’s threatening a lawsuit, saying he was given slow service because he voted for President-elect Donald Trump. Video captures Sanguesa losing his cool as he demanded a refund. “You’re trash,” he said, after having stepped into an employee area. “So what?” the woman said. “Because I voted for Trump,” he said. He demanded a barista’s name, an…
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Wynwood arts district becomes home to ‘irreverent’ law firm AXS

MIAMI – While most law firms base their operations out of regal-looking buildings at a city’s heart, Miami-based firm AXS Law Group has taken a different approach. AXS’ new space, decorated with murals by Andrew Antonaccio, ROA and Johnny Robles, is located at 2121 N.W. 2nd Ave in the main artery of Miami’s Wynwood arts district. Founding partner Jeremy Ben-David said in a statement that AXS’ office embodies the philosophy core to the firm’s approach to law: seasoned professionals …
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Oregon cities setting rules after opting in to legal pot

Some 30 counties and cities in Oregon approved some type of marijuana businesses in last week’s election, and officials in those communities now must establish rules for every step in the production and supply chain. When voters legalized recreational marijuana statewide two years ago, the communities — from the cowboy town of Pendleton to Sweet Home in the Willamette Valley — opted out. But many switched it up this month, voting to allow at least some form of the pot industry, including medical marijuana. “No one has done this in Oregon since liquor Prohibition,” said Scott Winkels, a lobbyist with the League of Oregon Cities. “This is the first time we’ve had to step in and develop and regulate a marketplace for a controlled substance since 1933.” Local officials must determine operating hours for marijuana retailers, growing farms and processors. They also were trying to figure out whether the businesses should be allowed near parks and what sort of security and odor controls the businesses must provide. The rule-setting also was happening in other states that have legalized recreational marijuana. In California, which approved pot last week, the San Jose City Council imposed a temporary ban — including on outdoor gardens — to give officials time to develop regulations for sales and farming. In Colorado, where voters passed marijuana in 2012, the rules were still being tweaked. This month, Denver became the first U.S. city to allow people to use marijuana in bars and restaurants, though state licensing officials announced a rule Friday that prohibits businesses with liquor licenses from allowing pot consumption on their premises. The move strikes a major blow to the voter-passed initiative. In Oregon, the Liquor Control Commission didn’t begin finalizing regulations and licensing businesses until this year. The communities that approved marijuana businesses on Election Day are now starting to look at regulations. “Most have been borrowing from each other,” said Rob Bovett, legal counsel of Association of Oregon Counties, describing efforts to establish ordinances. Opt-in ballot measures go into effect in January, Bovett said. If the jurisdictions want to reap the tax benefits at the earliest opportunity, they should have the regulations finalized before then so marijuana companies can seek licenses and start doing business, liquor commission spokesman Mark Pettinger said. The League of Oregon Cities has drawn up a guide to help struggling local officials. It says cities may impose restrictions on the hours of operation and the locations of producers, processors, wholesalers, as well as retailers and medical marijuana grow sites, processing sites and dispensaries. They may also regulate public access and how the businesses operate. “Probably most cities will use (the guide) as a template,” Winkels said. “The easiest way is to cut and paste the ordinance in … though some will probably be making local adjustments.” Robert Snyder, lawyer for the town of Sweet Home, said forming the rules is “going to take work” and that it will be up to the city council to decide whether to get public input. One marijuana ballot measure that passed last week imposed a 3 percent local sales tax on marijuana products, on top of a 17 percent state sales tax, Bovett said. Even counties and cities that decided to prohibit marijuana businesses hedged their bets by approving the additional tax so they can be prepared to impose it if voters eventually say yes to pot. “All (of Oregon’s) 111 cities and counties voted yes on the local tax,” Bovett said.
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