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The lawyer's account should've had $135000, the Bar said. It had less than $37.

The lawyer’s account should’ve had $135000, the Bar said. It had less than $37.

Missing money, misused money and healthcare fraud put three South Florida attorneys on the most recent Florida Bar discipline report and out of the legal business for a while. The Miami-Dade and Broward attorneys most recently disciplined by the state Supreme Court, in alphabetical order: ▪  A December emergency suspension order yanked the license of Coral Gables attorney Francisco Aguero (St. Thomas Law School, admitted to the Bar in 2000) until further notice. The Bar said it pursued t…
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Bill to create way to change gender designation clears panel

A panel of Utah lawmakers approved a Republican senator’s plan Monday to create a process for transgender people to legally change their gender designation through the courts, though not without some disagreement. The LGBT rights group Equality Utah said they’re concerned about some revisions in the bill, including a section that requires a person to live in state to make the change. “That’s unconstitutional, you cannot deny out-of-state residents a benefit,” said Cliff Rosky, a member of Equal…
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MDX Loses Toll System Lawsuit; Total Costs for Debacle Could Reach $78 Million

For five years, the Miami-Dade Expressway Authority insisted it was not at fault for the botched open road tolling system that began in 2010, a debacle the authority claims cost it millions in potential revenues. Instead, it blamed its contractor, saying Electronic Transactions Consultants Corp. misled MDX about its abilities and intentionally underbid the contract to design, develop, install and operate the toll enforcement system. ETC sued MDX in 2012 for breach of contract and bad faith, cla…
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Cities, states ban bump stocks after push stalls in Congress

In the immediate aftermath of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, there was a fevered pitch to ban bump stocks, the device that allowed the shooter’s semi-automatic rifles to mimic the rapid fire of machine guns. With that push stalled at the federal level, a handful of states and some cities are moving ahead with bans of their own. Massachusetts and New Jersey — two states at the time led by Republican governors — as well as the cities of Denver and Columbia, South Carolina…
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British judge to rule on Assange bid to get warrant dropped

British judge to rule on Assange bid to get warrant dropped

A British judge is scheduled to rule Tuesday on Julian Assange’s bid to force Britain to drop a warrant for his arrest, a development that would remove a substantial legal hurdle to his leaving the Ecuadorean Embassy in London that has been his refuge for more than five years. The legal issues surrounding the WikiLeaks founder’s case are complex: ___ WHAT IS BEING DECIDED TUESDAY? Assange’s legal team argued in Westminster Magistrates’ Court on Jan. 26 that a U.K. arrest warrant for Assange sho…
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Report: Lawsuits cost Missouri taxpayers $23 million

Lawsuits against the state of Missouri cost taxpayers at least $23 million last year, according to a new report from Attorney General Josh Hawley. A year-end report from Hawley, a Republican, showed that 16 of the 45 major payouts were related to employee discrimination, including six from cases involving workers at the Missouri Department of Corrections, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported . The report found the state paid out nearly $8.1 million in claims for employment discrimination and ha…
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Ohio Village Might Someday Pay Back $3 Million To Drivers Ticketed By Speed Cameras

Legal arguments, aside, the details of New Miami’s speed cameras were grosser than normal, as the town of 2,500 signed a contract with Optotraffic, a Maryland firm that supplied the cameras, which gave the company 40 percent of the fines from the cameras, leaving New Miami with the rest. “Since the …
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Couple uses law to take possession of abandoned home

A Reno couple used a little-known law to take possession of an abandoned home in an older, upscale part of town where similar brick, Tudor-style homes are selling for more than $400,000. Vickie and Jeff Francovich paid $6,500 in delinquent property taxes on a home in Reno’s Newlands Heights Historic District and started fixing up the home to move in, the Reno Gazette-Journal reported . The cost of the repairs and taxes was more than the house was worth when they found it in 2012, Vickie Francov…
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Five-hour standoff in Little Havana ends with no hostages, no weapons, no arrests

A woman who told police she was held inside a Miami club against her will, and that there were up to a dozen others still inside, set off a five-hour standoff Monday afternoon in which streets were cordoned off, schools were placed on lockdown and snipers readied on rooftops. In the end, no weapons were found, there were no hostages and police said only three people were ever inside Joseph’s Restaurant in Little Havana. Police continued to interview the trio into Monday evening about possible…
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Court ruling on felon voting rights doesn't end the story. Here's what happens next.

Court ruling on felon voting rights doesn’t end the story. Here’s what happens next.

Now that a judge has struck down Florida’s archaic system of restoring the right to vote to convicted felons, the real legal battle begins with a big unanswered question. What’s the solution? In a landmark decision, U.S. District Judge Mark Walker ruled Thursday that Florida’s Jim Crow-era vote restoration system violates the United States Constitution. Florida is one of three states, along with Iowa and Kentucky, that permanently strip convicted felons of their civil rights, including th…
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US prosecutor: Oregon has big pot overproduction problem

Oregon’s top federal prosecutor said Friday the state has a “formidable” problem with marijuana overproduction that winds up on the black market and that he wants to work with state and local leaders and the pot industry to do something about it. U.S. Attorney Billy Williams convened the unprecedented summit of influential federal law enforcement representatives, state officials and marijuana industry scions after Attorney General Jeff Sessions withdrew an Obama administration memo that had guided states with legalized weed on how to avoid federal scrutiny. The meeting included representatives from 13 other U.S. attorney’s offices, the FBI, the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, the U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Customs and Border Protection. U.S. attorneys from California, Washington, Colorado, Idaho, Alaska and Montana attended in person. Gov. Kate Brown, a Democrat, told guests that Williams has assured members of her administration that “lawful Oregon businesses remain stakeholders in this conversation and not targets of law enforcement.” The marijuana industry has been watching federal prosecutors in states with legalized weed like Oregon closely since Sessions rescinded the so-called Cole memo. U.S. attorneys in states where marijuana is legal under state law now face the delicate question of how to do their jobs and hew to the federal ban. Williams sought to calm fears among pot growers, but said the market has a problem that must be addressed. Everyone needs a “bottom-line answer” on how much excess marijuana is being produced and how much of it winds up on the black market, he said. Williams last month wrote a guest column in a newspaper in which he said the surplus attracts criminal networks and generates money laundering, drug violence and draws down water supplies in rural communities. “Here’s what I know in terms of the landscape here in Oregon, and that is, we have an identifiable and formidable marijuana overproduction and diversion problem,” he said Friday. There is general agreement that marijuana from Oregon does wind up in other states where it isn’t legal. Still, it’s hard to say if pot smuggling has gotten worse in Oregon — where illicit pot farmers were thriving long before recreational legalization — or how much of the marijuana leaving the state filters out from the legal side. Williams has previously said law enforcement in 16 other states have reported seizing marijuana from Oregon and postal agents have intercepted more than 2,600 pounds of pot in outbound packages and over $1.2 million in associated cash. Advocates dismiss the idea that legalization has caused a spike in black markets sales. It’s just that now, because it’s legal, it’s much easier to track it back, they said. “When I moved to Oregon in 1979, cannabis was a billion-dollar crop then, so the notion that this is somehow caused by legalization or by the medical program is something that’s misplaced,” said Leland Berger, an attorney who specializes in marijuana cases. Oregon did not cap the number of recreational pot producers, virtually guaranteeing an overproduction problem, said Seth Crawford, a former Oregon State University professor who’s an expert on marijuana economics and cannabis policy. He estimated Oregon growers produce up to three times the amount of marijuana that the state can absorb legally each year. “If you were an investor and you had just dropped $4 million into a (marijuana) grow and you had thousands of pounds of flower that was ready to go but you had nowhere to sell it … if you want any of your money back, the only thing you can do is sell it on the black market,” he said. “It was a system designed for failure.” Oregon voters approved the sale of recreational marijuana in 2014, and it became legal the following year. The state has allowed medical marijuana since 1998. It now has about 900 licensed recreational growers, with more than 1,100 licenses awaiting approval. Another roughly 25,600 growers in the state produce cannabis for medical marijuana patients. More than 500 retailers are licensed to sell recreational weed, with nearly 250 applications pending.
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Election official vows to update voter registration forms

The top election official in Delaware is pledging to update voter registration forms amid complaints that the state’s documents violate federal law. Campaign Legal Center is a Washington-based voter advocacy group. It says federal voter registration forms used in Delaware contain outdated information about the eligibility of felons to vote in state elections. Delaware Election Commissioner Elaine Manlove says the advocacy group is correct. She tells the News Journal of Wilmington that “we will …
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The Latest: Legal Oregon pot businesses ‘not targets’

The Latest on a marijuana summit convened by U.S. Attorney Billy Williams in Oregon (all times local): 11 a.m. Oregon Gov. Kate Brown says the top federal prosecutor in Oregon has assured her that he will not target legal marijuana business in the state. Brown made the remarks Friday at a summit convened by U.S. Attorney Billy Williams on how to address a surplus of marijuana that’s winding up on the black market. Williams announced the unprecedented meeting of nearly 80 federal, state, local a…
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Hawley: Greitens’ social media records can remain private

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens does not have to provide the state attorney general with records related to his social media accounts such as private messages and names of blocked users. The Kansas City Star reports that the office of Attorney General Josh Hawley said in a letter this week that the governor’s Twitter and Facebook accounts are not public records. Both Greitens and Hawley are Republicans. The Star also reported that Hawley’s office on Thursday announced it found no open records viola…
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Trump immigration plan draws criticism from top Senate Dem

Trump immigration plan draws criticism from top Senate Dem

The most contentious piece of President Donald Trump’s new proposal to protect the so-called Dreamers has nothing to do with them. It’s the plan’s potential impact on legal immigration that sparked fierce Democratic opposition Friday and appeared to sink chances for a bipartisan deal in Congress. The proposal outlined Thursday by the White House would end much family-based immigration and the visa lottery program, moves that some experts estimate could cut legal immigration into the United Stat…
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This needle-exchange program is saving lives in Miami-Dade. Now it could be coming to Tampa Bay.

For 13 months, the University of Miami doctor and medical professor and a team of staffers have been exchanging used needles for clean ones as part of a five-year pilot program in Miami-Dade County to cut down on the spread of HIV, hepatitis C and other blood-borne diseases among drug users. Each syringe is more than just pennies: It’s one less opportunity to spread disease and one less chance to injure someone who might come across discarded needles in the street, Tookes says. It also means on…
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UPS Store clerk caught on video kicking out client who didn’t speak English

They say that you can get by in Miami even if you don’t speak English, but you can’t get by without Spanish. Not all Miami residents like that linguistic imbalance. Some don’t talk about their discontent, some whisper it and a few say it loud. That third group may include a young UPS Store employee in Kendall, which has a good-sized Hispanic population. He is seen in a video recorded as he launched a xenophobic attack on a client who wanted a refund for a package she claimed was never del…
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Hockey 101: Scars a part of the skate-sharpening trade

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Beckham says he’ll reveal Miami MLS plans on Monday

David Beckham can finally see the goal in Miami, and his Major League Soccer team is about to be born. The soccer icon and his group of partners announced plans for a news conference Monday, saying they will make “an important announcement on the future of soccer in Miami.” Beckham is ready to draw his first Miami crowd, too: The event at a downtown arts center will be open to fans. MLS, which will stream the event live on its website, said they were participating in what will be “a special ann…
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Congressional delegation: Hands off Massachusetts pot law

Congressional delegation: Hands off Massachusetts pot law

Members of Massachusetts’ all-Democratic congressional delegation are faulting U.S. Attorney Andrew Lelling for saying participants in the state’s voter-approved marijuana trade could be at risk of prosecution. Lelling said Monday he “cannot provide assurances that certain categories of participants in the state-level marijuana trade will be immune from federal prosecution” after U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions moved to rescind an Obama-era policy that called for non-interference with state…
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Alumni: Class Notes

Donald S. Rosenberg, J.D. ’56. has been recognized by Best Lawyers as one of the 2018 Best Lawyers in America. Mr. Rosenberg is a Partner at the national construction law firm of Peckar & Abramson, P.C. Location: Miami, FL Tags: Awards & Recognitions E. Leonard Rubin, J.D. ’59, published a piece in the Chicago Daily Law Bulletin about a current lawsuit in which Paramount Pictures is claiming it owns the rights to all of the words of the Klingon language invented for the Star Trek franch…
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Congressional delegation: Hands off Massachusetts pot law

Members of Massachusetts’ all-Democratic congressional delegation are faulting U.S. Attorney Andrew Lelling for saying participants in the state’s voter-approved marijuana trade could be at risk of prosecution. Lelling said Monday he “cannot provide assurances that certain categories of participants in the state-level marijuana trade will be immune from federal prosecution” after U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions moved to rescind an Obama-era policy that called for non-interference with state…
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Miami Law Alumni Honored at 2017 Miami-Dade Judicial Reception & Holiday Party

Miriam Soler Ramos, Nikki Lewis Simon, Katie S. Phang, Patricia Elizee, Jordan Dresnick, and Dale Noll The Law Alumni Association recently hosted the 2017 Miami-Dade Judicial Reception & Holiday Party in Coral Gables. Sponsored by Iberiabank and the law firm of Kozyak Tropin and Throckmorton, the reception honored members of the judiciary, alumni award recipients, and Dean’s Circle members. The Law Alumni Achievement Award recipients included the Honorable John O’Sullivan, JD ’85, E…
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Miami Dolphins: Does TJ McDonald have an unresolved legal issue?

Miami Dolphins safety T.J. McDonald needs more time to complete the terms of his probation and has been granted the extra time, according to a person with knowledge of McDonald’s situation. McDonald was suspended for the first eight games of 2017 after an incident in California in 2016 in which he crashed into a parked car and was deemed under the influence of a substance. McDonald received 36 months’ probation, 200 hours of community service and attendance and 18 Narcotics Anonymou…
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Miami power couple ordered to replace illegally chopped mangroves

Miami power couple ordered to replace illegally chopped mangroves

A Miami power couple under fire for chopping down mangroves blocking their million-dollar bay view in the wake of Hurricane Irma have been cited for illegally removing the protected trees and ordered to replace them. Miami-Dade County environmental regulators, who enforce state mangrove laws, found that architects Bernardo Fort-Brescia and Laurinda Spear, who is also a landscape architect, removed the trees and filled wetlands despite numerous past warnings and citations for illegally cutting t…
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Unregulated sales of cannabis oil spike in Iowa

Unregulated sales of cannabis oil have been ramping up in Iowa even as state officials work to set up a tightly regulated distribution system for medical marijuana products. Several Iowa business are openly selling the oils, known as cannabidiol, or CBD, despite warnings from state officials that it’s illegal to do so in unregulated stores, the Des Moines Register reported . The regulatory system for medical marijuana won’t go into effect until next year. The system will have one state-licensed…
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Colorful past of ‘cocaine cowboys’ pilot may come back to haunt him

MIAMI — The colorful past of a pilot who has long bragged about flying loads of drugs for Colombian cartels during Miami’s “cocaine cowboys” era in the 1980s may come back to haunt him in an auto fraud case. A federal judge agreed Friday to let prosecutors use as evidence much of Mickey Munday’s open bragging about his past in media interviews, social media posts and in the 2006 documentary “Cocaine Cowboys.” But U.S. District Judge Robert Scola ruled that most direct drug references can’…
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Judge rejects ‘Bachelor’ star’s fatal accident law challenge

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — An Iowa farmer-turned-reality television star is fighting to avoid prison after driving his pickup into the back of a tractor and killing a neighbor. Chris Soules, who became known as “Prince Farming” during his 2015 appearance on “The Bachelor” and also appeared on “The Bachelorette” and “Dancing With The Stars,” lost a legal battle Friday in the felony case against him. A judge dismissed his constitutional challenge to an Iowa law requiring the surviv…
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Claire’s says its makeup is asbestos-free, but law firm says otherwise

Two weeks after a Rhode Island law firm said lab tests found cancer-causing asbestos in girls’ fashion chain Claire’s makeup, Claire’s declared Thursday the lab tests it funded proves the makeup is asbestos-free. Claire’s, based in Pembroke Pines, Fla., said it’ll still honor returns from customers feeling uneasy about any of the nine products it pulled off shelves in reaction to a Dec. 22 news report by Providence’s NBC10. The report said Rhode Island mother and law firm operations d…
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Constitutional arguments begin in Canadian polygamy case

Constitutional arguments begin in Canadian polygamy case

A Canadian man found guilty of marrying two dozen women says he believed he was entitled to practice polygamy because he wasn’t charged when police investigated him in the 1990s. Winston Blackmore appeared in British Columbia Supreme Court in Cranbrook this week where a judge is hearing arguments on whether Canada’s polygamy laws infringe on his rights to freedom of religion and expression. Blackmore is a leader of the community of Bountiful, British Columbia, where residents follow the teachin…
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Judges to examine if drug stash-house stings racially biased

The question of whether federal agents display racial bias by staging phony drug stash-house stings overwhelmingly in black neighborhoods is the focus of hearings beginning Thursday in Chicago and could determine whether agencies curtail or even abandon their use nationwide. A first-of-its-kind panel of federal trial judges holds two days of hearings on the stings, which are overseen by the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and typically involve agents posing as cartel couriers who talk suspects into agreeing to rob drugs that don’t exist from what they are told are guarded stash houses that are also fictitious. The nine panelists — each of whom presides over 12 separate stash-house cases with 43 defendants in all — chose to hear evidence simultaneously on the question after defense teams in the dozen cases all moved for the indictments to be tossed on grounds of racial bias. How the judges rule in coming weeks — and they could submit a single ruling — is expected to influence how courts around the country deal with similar claims about the stings, which have been a favorite tool of federal law enforcement dating back to the 1990s. Rulings in Chicago could also encourage the U.S. Supreme Court to take up issue. Among the panelists is Ruben Castillo, whose ruling in 2013 that there’s a “strong showing of potential bias” in the stings generated years of legal motions and dueling expert reports — culminating in this week’s hearings. He ruled just weeks after he was sworn in as the federal court’s first Hispanic chief judge. Stash-house stings have been criticized on other grounds, including in how agents dangle the prospect of pocketing tens of thousands of dollars to often poor, desperate subjects. Some courts have warned the stings risk crossing the line into illegally entrapping suspects. Authorities insist they’re careful not to entrap anyone, targeting only those with records of violent crimes and who say unequivocally they want in on armed robberies. The answer to the question of whether the stings discriminate by race hinges largely on competing interpretations of statistics. Defense lawyers say the fact that around 80 percent of stings are conducted in predominantly African-American neighborhoods speaks for itself. Their main witness is Jeffrey Fagan, a professor at Columbia Law School. In his report for defense lawyers, he notes that out of 94 stash-house defendants in the Chicago area between 2006 and 2013, 74 were black, 12 were Hispanic and just eight were white. That and other data, he writes, proves a “pattern of discrimination.” But government lawyers say it’s only natural that trafficking-related stings are focused where trafficking activity is highest — in low-income areas on Chicago’s South and West Sides. Fagan’s report, they contend in one filing, “is riddled with false assumptions … designed to manufacture a racial disparity where none exists.” Their expert is Max Schanzenbach, a professor at the Northwestern University School of Law. After scrutinizing the same data, he faulted Fagan’s methodology. “A straightforward comparison of the stash house defendants to reasonable comparison groups — those arrested for similar crimes, in particular a home invasion involving a firearm — finds no statistical evidence of discrimination,” he concludes. Some judges have gone on the record criticizing agents’ power to arbitrarily increase the severity of charges and potential sentences simply by increasing the amount of drugs they tell targets are in the non-existent stash houses. And suspects can be charged not only with trying to steal but with trying to distribute the phantom drugs, charges that carry stiff mandatory prison terms. “The time has come to remind the Executive Branch that the Constitution charges it with law enforcement — not crime creation,” a U.S. judge in central California, Otis Wright, wrote in a scathing 2014 ruling. “The Constitution will not tolerate subjecting an individual to prosecution for an imaginary crime subject to a very real punishment.”
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Appeals court strikes down Miami Beach minimum wage increase

Minimum wage workers in Miami Beach — and the political ambitions of Mayor Philip Levine — took a hit Wednesday when an appeals court affirmed a Miami-Dade circuit court decision from earlier this year to reject the city’s proposed minimum wage law. Levine introduced his proposal to great fanfare in June 2016, which mandated the city set a minimum wage at $10.31 as of Jan. 1, 2018, then increase it by a dollar a year until 2021. City officials understood the proposal flew in the face…
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Minnesota Senate appointment creates a mess back home

The elevation of Minnesota’s Republican state Senate president to lieutenant governor as part of a chain reaction after U.S. Sen. Al Franken’s resignation will likely lead to a legal fight over whether she can hold two jobs. Gov. Mark Dayton appointed fellow Democrat Lt. Gov. Tina Smith on Wednesday to take Franken’s seat when he steps down, which she indicated would likely be in early January. That choice quickly triggered major constitutional questions of how she’ll be replaced and partisan b…
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GCR to host seventh antitrust conference in Miami

US Federal Trade Commission official Bruce Hoffman and US Department of Justice deputy head Barry Nigro lead a packed line up of global antitrust enforcers at GCR Live’s 7th Annual Antitrust Law Leaders Forum in Miami early next year. The forum, held over two days in early February, will gather speakers from government, private practice and academia to discuss pressing issues in antitrust, in the US and internationally. Charles Rivers Associates vice president Margaret Sanderson and Blake…
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New chief legal counsel appointed to the Wisconsin DNR

New chief legal counsel appointed to the Wisconsin DNR

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has appointed a lawyer from a conservative public interest litigation group to be the state Department of Natural Resources’ new chief legal counsel. Jake Curtis’s appointment is the first time the department has hired an outside lawyer to handle legal issues. Curtis has been an attorney for nearly 10 years and joined the department on Monday. He replaces attorney Quinn Williams, who has moved to the Department of Administration. The appointment is troubling because …
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NY queries Project Veritas over leader’s past conviction

Project Veritas, which has used disguises and hidden cameras to uncover supposed liberal bias in the mainstream media, could lose its ability to raise money in New York because it didn’t disclose its founder’s criminal record, the state attorney general said. The Democratic prosecutor’s office wrote to the nonprofit on Wednesday, two days after The Washington Post reported that a woman affiliated with the group tried to get the newspaper to report a false sex assault allegation against Republic…
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Egypt’s FM says no restrictions on presidential hopeful

Egypt’s foreign minister says there is no legal reason restricting former air force commander and government minister Ahmed Shafiq from contesting the 2018 presidential elections. Sameh Shoukry’s remarks on Friday came at a forum in Rome just days after Shafiq announced his intention to run. “I know he’s had some issues with the judiciary. I am not sure whether those have been resolved or not,” Shoukry said, adding that in principal anyone without pending legal cases is free to run. Shafiq narr…
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Local attorney suspended from practicing law

MIAMI COUNTY — A former Miami County lawyer had his license to practice law suspended indefinitely by the Ohio Supreme Court as of Nov. 29. Christopher R. Bucio, a former partner of Roberts, Kelly & Bucio, LLP, (now called Roberts and Kelly), had his license suspended on an interim basis following a seven-year legal battle in Shelby County Common Pleas Court in January of this year. Bucio was found to have violated several professional conduct standards regarding the unauthorized use …
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Miami Law’s Innocence Clinic Takes on New Client with a Compelling Case

Miami Law’s Innocence Clinic recently began investigating a case with a potentially compelling claim of innocence. Kenneth Patterson was arrested in February 1998 after his co-defendant Tevenin Wagenson identified him as the getaway driver for the armed robbery he committed at an IHOP in Miramar, Florida. Curiously, Wagenson admitted to committing the robbery and originally said a man named Charles, not Patterson, was the getaway driver.  After agreeing to cooperate with the State, Wagenson…
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Removal of Jefferson Davis plaque in Kentucky delayed

Removal of Jefferson Davis plaque in Kentucky delayed

A plaque in the Kentucky Capitol declaring the only president of the Confederacy to be a hero and a patriot will stay until a lawyer with Republican Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration can determine if the decision to remove it was legal. The plaque is attached to a 15-foot (4.5 meters) marble statue of Jefferson Davis, who was born in Kentucky and was president of the Confederacy during the Civil War. Efforts to remove the statue have been ongoing for years, but they gained momentum following the…
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The Latest: Court weighs parent rights in same-sex divorce

The Latest on a Mississippi court case where a woman is seeking parental rights along with her ex-wife (all times local): 1:45 p.m. A lawyer for a woman seeking parental rights to a 6-year-old boy told the Mississippi’s Supreme Court that it must rule in her favor after the U.S. Supreme Court authorized same-sex marriage nationwide. But a lawyer for her ex-wife, who bore the child while the two were married, says a court needs to first terminate the parental rights of the anonymous sperm donor….
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Second lawsuit filed over state education board turmoil

A Springfield teacher is suing the Missouri Board of Education over a closed session it held last week to discuss plans for removing Education Commissioner Margie Vandeven. In a lawsuit filed Tuesday, Laurie Sullivan claims the board “purposefully violated” the state’s open meetings law when members held a closed meeting Nov. 21 to decide who from southwest Missouri would be able to vote on Vandeven’s future, The Springfield News-Leader reported . Gov. Eric Greitens had appointed and then remov…
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Positive pot test derails plea deal for woman who maimed Miami principal in DUI crash

After months of waffling, the woman who maimed a popular South Dade High principal in a drunken car crash was ready to accept seven years in prison. Then things went up in smoke. Just minutes before she was to take a plea deal on Wednesday, Marilyn Aguilera tested positive for marijuana, which spurred a judge to call off the arrangement and order her re-arrested for violating the conditions of her release from jail. Now, she’ll sit in jail without knowing her fate, at least until Dec. 11. Tha…
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Miami Developer Sues Law Firm, Shareholder Over Failed Real Estate Project

Miami Developer Avra Jain filed a malpractice and breach of fiduciary duty lawsuit against Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney, seeking about $15 million from the firm and shareholder Richard A. Morgan. Jain is a Wall Street financier-turned-developer, known for transforming warehouses to lofts and condominiums, and revamping motels on Biscayne Boulevard near downtown Miami. But after a courtroom defeat in a multimillion-dollar spat with a onetime partner, Jain wants the court to ho…
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The Latest: EU warns of more action over refusal of refugees

The Latest: EU warns of more action over refusal of refugees

The Latest on the flow of migrants into Europe (all times local): 8:50 p.m. Police have blocked some 200 migrants and asylum-seekers from leaving a city in northern Greece for the Macedonian border in hopes of traveling on to other European Union countries. Dozens of officers in riot gear used shields to push back the migrants near the center Thessaloniki and blocked the road with police buses late Wednesday. The migrants — including families with young children — refused to leave and sat d…
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Wanted polygamist free after 15 years on the lam in Mexico

A polygamist who fled to Mexico about 15 years ago with his wives and kids while facing child molestation charges in Arizona is now free after the charges were dropped months ago. Orson William Black Jr. was arrested by Mexican authorities in the northern state of Chihuahua and handed over to U.S. officials in El Paso, Texas, last week. He was briefly held on an Arizona fugitive warrant before being released because no agency would extradite him, El Paso County sheriff’s spokeswoman Chris Acost…
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Las Vegas shooting lawsuits stack up with 14 more filed

Legal action stemming from the mass shooting at a Las Vegas concert is picking up with lawsuits filed on behalf of 14 concertgoers. The 14 civil …
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Miami Meeting of Legislators from Gaming States Approved for 10.0 Continuing Legal Education …

MIAMI, FL — (Marketwired) — 11/15/17 — The January 5-7, 2018, Winter Meeting of the National Council of Legislators from Gaming States (NCLGS) has been approved for 10.0 Continuing Legal Education credits by the Nevada Board, underscoring its importance as a serious forum for discussing the legislative, legal and regulatory issues regarding all aspects of legalized gambling. “The NCLGS Winter Meeting provides an outstanding opportunity for attorneys to learn from legislators and contribute t…
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Swedes say little help from Congo in murder investigation

A Swedish prosecutor says authorities are getting little help from Congo in their investigations into the slayings of two U.N. experts — of which them a Swede — by militiamen from Congo’s violence-torn Kasai region. Prosecutor Sara Nilsson says their material “does not rule out that people close to the regime in Congo are involved in the murder.” Sweden launched its murder investigation two days after the bodies of dual Swedish-Chilean national Zaida Catalan and American Michael Sharp were …
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