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The Latest: EU warns of more action over refusal of refugees

The Latest: EU warns of more action over refusal of refugees

The Latest on the flow of migrants into Europe (all times local): 8:50 p.m. Police have blocked some 200 migrants and asylum-seekers from leaving a city in northern Greece for the Macedonian border in hopes of traveling on to other European Union countries. Dozens of officers in riot gear used shields to push back the migrants near the center Thessaloniki and blocked the road with police buses late Wednesday. The migrants — including families with young children — refused to leave and sat d…
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Wanted polygamist free after 15 years on the lam in Mexico

A polygamist who fled to Mexico about 15 years ago with his wives and kids while facing child molestation charges in Arizona is now free after the charges were dropped months ago. Orson William Black Jr. was arrested by Mexican authorities in the northern state of Chihuahua and handed over to U.S. officials in El Paso, Texas, last week. He was briefly held on an Arizona fugitive warrant before being released because no agency would extradite him, El Paso County sheriff’s spokeswoman Chris Acost…
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Las Vegas shooting lawsuits stack up with 14 more filed

Legal action stemming from the mass shooting at a Las Vegas concert is picking up with lawsuits filed on behalf of 14 concertgoers. The 14 civil …
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Miami Meeting of Legislators from Gaming States Approved for 10.0 Continuing Legal Education …

MIAMI, FL — (Marketwired) — 11/15/17 — The January 5-7, 2018, Winter Meeting of the National Council of Legislators from Gaming States (NCLGS) has been approved for 10.0 Continuing Legal Education credits by the Nevada Board, underscoring its importance as a serious forum for discussing the legislative, legal and regulatory issues regarding all aspects of legalized gambling. “The NCLGS Winter Meeting provides an outstanding opportunity for attorneys to learn from legislators and contribute t…
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Swedes say little help from Congo in murder investigation

A Swedish prosecutor says authorities are getting little help from Congo in their investigations into the slayings of two U.N. experts — of which them a Swede — by militiamen from Congo’s violence-torn Kasai region. Prosecutor Sara Nilsson says their material “does not rule out that people close to the regime in Congo are involved in the murder.” Sweden launched its murder investigation two days after the bodies of dual Swedish-Chilean national Zaida Catalan and American Michael Sharp were …
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Digging Coal, Burying Regulations?: Legal Barriers to Proposed Energy Market Reform

Digging Coal, Burying Regulations?: Legal Barriers to Proposed Energy Market Reform

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Comment Name * Email * Website KATRINA TOMAS—President Trump’s promise to end the “war on coal” has, in the past month, resulted in agency actions that endeavor to instigate a war on carbon regulation. On October 10th, U.S. Secretary of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Scott Pruitt, announced a proposed repeal of the Clean Power Plan, the Obama administration’s fully finalized regulation created to reduc…
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Lawyer calls judge’s move to ban him in Oregon ‘vindictive’

A Utah lawyer who worked on an Oregon refuge case called a judge’s move to ban him from practicing law in federal court in Oregon “vindictive.” Marcus Mumford questioned the authority of Oregon’s chief U.S. District Judge Michael W. Mosman to strip him of his legal authority to practice law in Oregon federal court. He also accused deputy U.S. Marshals, who tackled him and stunned him with a Taser gun after Ammon Bundy’s acquittal a year ago, of trying to “settle scores” in the wake of his succe…
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France eyes setting age for sexual consent; 13 suggested

A bill being prepared by the French government could set a minimum legal age for sexual consent for the first time, and the country’s justice minister said Monday that she thinks 13 years old could be a reasonable age. Justice Minister Nicole Belloubet told France’s RTL radio network that age 13 was a “limit that is worth considering” for the upcoming legislation, but noted that judges should also have the ability to assess whether someone was old enough to give consent in individual situations…
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Justices add anti-abortion counseling to free-speech lineup

The Supreme Court will hear a free speech challenge to a California law that targets anti-abortion crisis pregnancy centers, adding to a term that is loaded with First Amendment disputes. The justices said Monday they will review the centers’ complaint that the new law, pushed by an abortion-rights group, forces them to provide information about abortion and other services. Lower courts had allowed the law to take effect. Unlicensed centers also must inform clients of their status. Two other ne…
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Pot-friendly San Francisco fights over recreational cannabis

Famously pro-cannabis San Francisco, where the 4/20 marijuana holiday is celebrated with a group smoke-out on Hippie Hill, is having a surprisingly difficult time establishing regulations for the broad legal pot market coming to California in January. Writing local rules in the weed-friendly city has taken a contentious turn as critics, many of them older Chinese immigrants who oppose marijuana use, try to restrict where pot can be sold. Divided San Francisco supervisors are scheduled to take u…
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Syrians file legal complaint in Germany against Assad govt

Syrians file legal complaint in Germany against Assad govt

A group of European human rights lawyers say they have filed complaints with German federal prosecutors on behalf of 15 Syrians, alleging they were victims of crimes against humanity and war crimes by President Bashar Assad’s government. The European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights said Wednesday one complaint involves allegations of torture and other crimes at the hands of Syrian Air Force Intelligence. Nine Syrians in Germany and two Syrian lawyers are listed as complainants in tha…
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Bill would lower drinking age in Wisconsin to 19

Wisconsin’s beer-loving reputation would get a boost under a proposal to lower the state’s drinking age to 19. But teenagers shouldn’t reserve those kegs just yet. The bill, circulated Wednesday by three Republican lawmakers including the former president of the Wisconsin Tavern League, has to overcome at least two big hurdles before it could become law. First, it’s not supported by Republican Assembly Speaker Robin Vos, who plays a central role in determining which ideas are brought up for a v…
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Reward offered in possible poisoning of dog in legal fight

The Humane Society of Utah is offering a $5,000 reward for information about the possible poisoning of a family dog at the center of a legal battle over a judge’s order to put down the animal after it bit a teenager. Dexter, a 5-year-old Australian Shepherd, is recovering from symptoms consistent with ingesting rat poison. Owner Lindsy Bray of Santaquin said she filed a police report after the dog underwent three days of treatment by a vet who determined the likely cause of the symptoms. Police…
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Traffic ticket firm sues over unlicensed law practice claims

A Florida company that provides a way to resolve traffic tickets using a cellphone or computer filed a lawsuit Wednesday claiming The Florida Bar and a more traditional ticket firm are conspiring to shut it down by making false allegations against it. The company, TIKD, seeks damages of more than $11 million to compensate for lost revenue from the Bar and from The Ticket Clinic, a law firm that operates across the country. TIKD also wants a Miami federal judge to rule that its operations are le…
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‘Dirty soda’ Utah court battle ends with legal settlement

Two Utah chains that sell flavor-shot-spiked “dirty sodas” ended their court battle Wednesday over the sugary drink concept that’s grown increasingly profitable in a state where sugar is a common vice. Soda shops Sodalicious and Swig will pay their own expenses, court papers said. The documents offer no details of the settlement terms and attorneys for the two sides did not return messages seeking comment. Swig had accused competitor Sodalicious of copying the trademarked “dirty” idea, down to …
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Genovese Joblove & Battista commissions heroic soldier statue for Felsberg Veterans Plaza at FIU

Genovese Joblove & Battista commissions heroic soldier statue for Felsberg Veterans Plaza at FIU

Plaza will Serve as Gathering Place for Community to Pay Tribute to FIU Veterans FIU to Host Unveiling Ceremony on Veterans Day To honor the service men and women who have made the ultimate sacrifice, Miami-based law firm Genovese Joblove & Battista (GJB) has teamed up with Florida International University to provide the lead gift for a sculpture of FIU alumnus Paul Michael Felsberg that will serve as the centerpiece of the university’s new veterans memorial, the Felsberg Veterans Plaza….
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Broadcom offers $103 billion for Qualcomm in chip megadeal

Broadcom made an unsolicited, $103 billion offer for rival chipmaker Qualcomm, the tech industry’s largest attempted takeover that is destined to come under intense regulatory scrutiny. Qualcomm, known to consumers as the maker of Snapdragon chips found in smartphones and tablets, is already the No. 3 chip supplier, according to research firm Gartner, trailing Intel and Samsung. A combination with Broadcom would not change that. But a transaction between the two would likely raise antitrust con…
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Attorney Alexander Borell Creates Paperless Law Office to Help Clients and the Environment

MIAMI–(BUSINESS WIRE )–Last year Attorney Alexander Borell expanded his services to offer Immigration, Family, and Criminal Law. Adding additional areas of practice to an already-busy foreclosure law firm created a high volume of clients and demanded a new level of due diligence. “I wanted to expand my practice, but I didn’t want to sacrifice the quality of service that my firm has always provided,” said Borell, a Miami Foreclosure Attorney for almost 30 years. To accommodate the expans…
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Law Offices of Mark S. Steinberg, PA Celebrates Silver Anniversary

The Law Offices of Mark S. Steinberg, P.A., which focuses on consumer and business bankruptcy, consumer defense, creditor harassment, tax debt negotiation and family law, is celebrating its twenty-fifth anniversary. “It has been a privilege to work in Miami for all of these years and to have the opportunity to help so many people,” said attorney Mark Steinberg, founder of The Law Offices of Mark S. Steinberg, P.A. Since its inception, the firm has striven to develop a personalized legal str…
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Moratoriums may mean long drives for legal marijuana

Although retail sales of recreational marijuana can begin in July, many customers across northern Massachusetts may have to travel significant distances or wait several months to acquire the substance. Moratoriums are becoming widespread, with many towns opting to block any recreational marijuana businesses into late 2018 as a way to buy time for developing zoning and regulation plans. Some, as allowed under the state law legalizing the drug, have opted instead for outright, permanent bans on t…
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State Sen. Campbell disputes DUI, says he wasn't driving

State Sen. Campbell disputes DUI, says he wasn’t driving

Troopers say a South Carolina state senator charged with driving under the influence had a blood-alcohol level above the legal limit, but Sen. Paul Campbell said that doesn’t matter because he wasn’t driving. Campbell’s blood-alcohol level was 0.09 percent on a breath test taken at the Charleston County jail after the Saturday night crash, Highway Patrol Cpl. Sonny Collins said. The legal limit in South Carolina is 0.08 percent. Campbell and his wife, Vicki, were also charged with providing fal…
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Lawyer: Legislators don’t have to give up documents in suit

Mississippi legislators are telling a federal judge that they shouldn’t have to turn over documents about their 2016 vote to shift control of Jackson’s airports to a new board mostly appointed by state officials. Mike Wallace, an attorney for eight lawmakers, on Monday argued before U.S. Magistrate Judge Keith Ball that his clients are protected from having to turn over any documents by a principle known as legislative privilege. That means lawmakers can’t be hauled into court for anything they…
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Voters to decide new governor, Legislature, ballot questions

New Jersey voters go to the polls Tuesday to pick the successor to Republican Gov. Chris Christie and a new Legislature. They’ll also weigh in on how much money should be spent from the funds collected from lawsuit settlements involving the cleanup of natural resources and whether to approve borrowing for libraries. Democrat Phil Murphy and Republican Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno are the two top party candidates for governor. Five third-party and independent candidates also are on the ballot. Experts …
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Slain man was shot in back by police, death certificate says

The death certificate for a black man killed by police in Kansas’ capital city in September says he died from gunshot wounds to his back. The Topeka Capital-Journal reports that it obtained a copy of Dominique White’s death certificate Saturday. The document isn’t a public record. Topeka police said initially that White was shot after a struggle and that at least one shot struck his chest. The death certificate lists “gunshot wounds of back” as the immediate cause of death for White, who was 30…
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Lawmakers fail to override veto of legal marijuana bill

Maine lawmakers failed Monday to override Republican Gov. Paul LePage’s veto of a bill to regulate and tax the sale of marijuana, dealing a setback to pot advocates who want to see the product in stores. Lawmakers needed a two-thirds majority in both chambers Monday evening to override the veto and fell well short. The result means lawmakers will have to go back to the drawing board in January to craft rules governing the sale of marijuana in Maine. The result came after LePage urged lawmakers …
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Ohio announces first set of medical marijuana growers

Ohio announces first set of medical marijuana growers

Columbus — Operations in Dayton and Huber Heights were included among the 11 Level II medical marijuana licenses announced Friday by the state of Ohio, but there remains some uncertainty whether either site will be state-approved to grow pot. Two companies submitted applications for multiple locations, but can choose only one under state rules. That means Ohio Clean Leaf LLC has 10 days to decide whether to pick from its proposed sites in Dayton and Carroll in Fairfield County. The Huber Heig…
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South Florida Adds More Black Judges After Push From Bar Groups

Hans Ottinot, chair of the Miami-Dade Judicial Nominating Commission. … But in a recent meeting with members of the Haitian business and legal …
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Indiana cop wins sexual harassment suit against ex employer

The South Bend Police Department illegally retaliated against a female officer who accused a male supervisor of sexual harassment for suggesting she could wear a miniskirt and high heels to a meeting, a federal jury found. The jury on Thursday awarded former South Bend officer Joy Phillips $35,000 in damages for distress, pain and suffering. Philipps accused the department of targeting her with a series of internal investigations and disciplinary actions after she filed a sexual harassment comp…
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Miami voters hit the polls Tuesday in consequential city election

Voters in the city of Miami are just days away from choosing a new mayor, two new commissioners and whether to spend $400 million on affordable housing and sea-rise projects in a consequential election that will decide the fate not only of the Magic City but also its political dynasties. More than 13,000 have already voted early or by mail. But no one will know for sure before Tuesday night whether the city will once again have a Suarez as mayor and a Regalado or Carollo as commissioner — a s…
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China makes disrespecting national anthem punishable by jail

China’s rubber-stamp legislature on Saturday made disrespecting the national anthem a criminal offense punishable by up to three years in prison amid rising nationalist appeals from the ruling Communist Party under the leadership of President Xi Jinping. The Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress passed an amendment to the country’s criminal law outlining punishments for people found “seriously” disrespecting the national anthem in public. The move follows Xi’s appointment to a se…
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Proposed NY law aims to protect models from harassment

Proposed NY law aims to protect models from harassment

A New York lawmaker wants to amend the state’s anti-discrimination laws to protect models from sexual harassment. The New York Times reports that the proposal by Democratic Assemblywoman Nily Rozic (NEE’-lee ROH’-zihk) of Queens would make designers, photographers, retailers and others liable for abuses experienced on their watch. Many New York models have limited legal protections because they’re classified as independent contractors. The issue was brought to Rozic’s attention several months a…
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$437000 in Legal Fees Flow From All-Natural Skim Milk Fight

Florida has agreed to pay $428,855 in legal fees to pro bono attorneys who beat the state on a First Amendment skim-milk labeling dispute filed by a natural-foods creamery. Mary Lou Wesselhoeft of Ocheesee Creamery was represented by two Miami attorneys at the Institute for Justice, a nonprofit libertarian public interest law firm based in Virginia. The Florida Panhandle milk producer “felt like she was banging her head against the wall” and sued state Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam …
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TPG to acquire Exactech in take-private deal

TPG Capital has agreed to acquire Exactech in a take-private buyout for $42 per share. After the closing of the deal, Exactech will no longer trade on the NASDAQ. J.P. Morgan Securities LLC is serving as financial adviser to Exactech on the transaction. Greenberg Traurig, P.A. (Miami) and Greenberg Traurig, LLP (NYC) are providing legal advice to Exactech while Ropes & Gray is legal adviser to TPG. Based in Gainesville, Florida, Exactech is a developer of orthopaedic implant devices and …
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Miami’s Jim Larranaga Admits He Was Mentioned In FBI’s NCAA Investigation

When the FBI first announced its investigation in late September, Larranaga and the Miami legal team denied any knowledge of payments that would …
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FBI: Florida man sympathized with IS, wanted to bomb mall

A Florida man who described himself as a sympathizer of the Islamic State extremist group faces terrorism-related charges stemming from a purported plot to bomb a Miami-area shopping mall, according to court documents filed Monday. Vicente Adolfo Solano, 53, appeared at a brief hearing Monday afternoon on a charge of attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction at the Dolphin Mall west of Miami. Solano was arrested Friday after accepting a fake bomb provided by the FBI outside the mall, according to an FBI affidavit. U.S. Magistrate Judge Chris McAliley said she will appoint a public defender to represent Solano, who is being held without bail. A bond hearing is set Thursday and Assistant U.S. Attorney Karen Gilbert said the government wants him kept behind bars until trial as a risk of flight and danger to the community. Solano told the judge he works as a painter earning $13 an hour. No relatives appeared at the hearing. Court records show Solano has had only minor brushes with the law, most recently in 2014 and 2015 for driving with a suspended license. That document noted he had no prior felony record. The FBI began investigating Solano in late September after a confidential informant tipped agents off about his plans, the affidavit said. Most of the subsequent conversations were recorded. Investigators also found three pro-Islamic State videos that Solano allegedly sent to the confidential informant. “I am here because I like the way (Islamic State) confronts the United States and the countries of the coalition,” Solano allegedly said in one video, wearing a black mask and shirt and standing in front of black flag. “The United States is the most terrorist country of all. I am going to plant a bomb … that’s how it’s going to be done.” In a second video, Solano said he is a “sympathizer of the Islamic group, ISIS” using another acronym for the Islamic State. It’s not clear from the affidavit whether Solano had any links to any foreign terrorist groups. At one point, he told the confidential informant he had not discussed his plot with anyone else. His plans started to come together in October when the confidential informant introduced Solano to an undercover FBI employee who could supposedly help build a bomb. Solano provided a sketch of the food court at the mall, which he thought would be most crowded, according to the FBI. “It’s easy because look … I go in, I sit down, I leave it and goodbye. I leave it. I won’t have a problem with that,” Solano said in one conversation recorded by the FBI. After buying screws and other materials to build the bomb, Solano met with the two undercover FBI men at a hotel to put it together. Then the three of them drove over to the mall, where “Solano took steps that he believed would arm the device and the timer to count down” on the fake bomb, the affidavit said. The Famed Arecibo Observatory survived, nearly unscathed, Hurricane Maria’s lashing of Puerto Rico. Nulla quis lorem ut libero malesuada feugiat. Quisque velit nisi, pretium ut lacinia in, elementum id enim. Vivamus magna justo, lacinia eget consectetur sed, convallis at tellus. Donec sollicitudin molestie malesuada. Sed porttitor lectus nibh
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The Latest: States suing to force insurance subsidy payments

The Latest: States suing to force insurance subsidy payments

The Latest on President Donald Trump and health care legislation (all times local): 10 p.m. A bipartisan group of governors is urging congressional leaders to support a plan to calm health insurance markets after President Donald Trump blocked federal subsidies to insurers. The letter, signed by 10 governors, says, “Stabilizing insurance markets is one of the primary areas where Congress can take action to ensure that consumers have affordable health care options.” The agreement by Sens. Lamar …
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Confusion over open meetings creates unrest on constitution panel

Can members of the powerful panel that has the authority to put constitutional amendments directly on the November 2018 ballot discuss votes in secret and lobby each other? That is the question Indian River County Commissioner Bob Solari has been trying to get answered for six months. Now, his failure to get an answer, he said, could spell trouble for the commission. As a member of the Constitution Revision Commission, Solari left the June 6 meeting of the commission baffled and confused. The m…
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Retired Vermont AG ready for deposition in records case

Retired Vermont Attorney General William Sorrell said Wednesday he was ready to be deposed by lawyers seeking information about public business he might have conducted from his private email account in a case that could have broader public policy implications for former public officials. Sorrell made the comments after Washington County Superior Court Judge Mary Miles Teachout ruled Wednesday that keeping information on a private email account was akin to keeping work correspondence in a desk d…
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2 indicted in fatal fentanyl OD death in Miami County

Thank you for registering! We look forward to seeing you on whio.com frequently. Visit us and sign in to update your profile, receive the latest news and keep up to date with mobile alerts. Click here to return to the page you were visiting. We’ve sent an email with instructions to create a new password. Your existing password has not been changed. By submitting your registration information, you agree to our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. We have sent you a verification email. Please che…
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No masks or water bottles: What to know ahead of Richard Spencer’s speech at UF

Tensions are rising in the small college town of Gainesville as law enforcement, faculty and students alike prepare for Richard Spencer, a white nationalist and self-described leader of the so-called “alt-right,” to speak at the University of Florida. Spencer’s initial request to speak at the school was denied, but the university relented under the threat of legal action and allowed Spencer to rent the Phillips Center from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. on Thursday. Auburn University, the last school …
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Pictured: The tragic eight-year-old girl who died after falling from second-story balcony inside …

Pictured: The tragic eight-year-old girl who died after falling from second-story balcony inside …

An eight-year-old girl who died after falling from a cruise ship balcony while it was docked at a port in Miami has been identified.  Investigators said Zion Smith, 8, fell off the second storey deck of the Carnival Cruise ship Glory around 8.15am ET Saturday morning.  Now her family is demanding answers. Scroll down for video    Damien Fox, the girl’s uncle, told ABC Local 10 he also wanted to see surveillance video from inside the ship.   He described Zion – who is from Nassau in the…
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Democrats accuse EPA’s Pruitt of misusing taxpayer funds

Top-ranking Congressional Democrats are calling on a federal watchdog to review whether Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt broke the law by making a video for a private group opposing an Obama-era clean-water rule. Pruitt flew to Colorado for an August event organized by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, an industry trade association representing cattle producers. While at the ranch, Pruitt recorded a video urging the group’s members to file comments supporting the repeal of EPA’s Waters of the United States rule. The 2015 rule seeks to expand the agency’s jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act to include smaller streams and wetlands. In a letter sent last week, the top Democrats on four committees with oversight of EPA asked the head of the Government Accountability Office to issue a formal legal ruling on whether Pruitt’s participation in the video violated federal rules. They cited longstanding prohibitions against federal officials using taxpayer funds “for publicity or propaganda purposes, and for the preparation, distribution or use of any kit, pamphlet, booklet, publication, radio, television, or film presentation designed to support or defeat legislation pending before the Congress.” EPA did not respond to messages seeking comment about the letter or provide the total cost to taxpayers for his trip. The Associated Press and other media outlets have previously reported about Pruitt’s frequent westward travel, which often occurs on Thursdays and Fridays to allow the EPA chief to spend weekends at his home in Oklahoma. Records show Pruitt typically travels with at least two aides and members of his full-time security detail. EPA’s inspector general is currently reviewing the “frequency, cost, and extent” of Pruitt’s trips to determine whether they adhere to federal travel polices. The trip to Colorado was billed by EPA as part of Pruitt’s “State Action Tour” to rally opposition to Obama-era environmental regulations. In the video, Pruitt criticizes the WOTUS rule as an example of federal overreach, redefining the Clean Water Act to cover “a puddle, a dry creek bed and ephemeral drainage ditches across this country.” The video was posted on YouTube and on the Beef Association’s website, along with language urging the ranchers to “Urge Congress to Stop EPA’s Unlawful Expansion” and “Let your Congressional representatives know that they should not allow EPA … to trample on your Constitutional rights.” “EPA effectively constructed a message, delivered by the Administrator, and intended for the NCBA to distribute that message through an online video,” the Democrats said. “Additionally, the viewing audience may be unable to discern the source of that message, because in the video, the EPA Administrator’s image, name, and title appear alongside the name and logo of the NCBA.” The letter was signed by Rep. Peter DeFazio of Oregon, the ranking Democrat on the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure; Rep. Betty McCollum of Minnesota, the ranking Democrat on the Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior and Environment; Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. of New Jersey, the ranking Democrat on the Committee on Energy and Commerce; and Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland, the ranking Democrat on the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. GAO spokesman Chuck Young confirmed the letter had been received, but said it would likely be weeks before any decision is made about whether to issue the legal ruling sought by the Democrats. Colin Woodall, the senior vice president for government affairs at the Beef Association, said EPA had asked to group to organize an event where Pruitt could appear with stakeholders in the ranching community.” “In advance of the visit, NCBA requested an interview with Administrator Pruitt and worked with the EPA Office of Public Affairs to arrange the interview at the event,” Woodall said. “In the unscripted interview, Administrator Pruitt explains his State Action Tour and encourages stakeholders to submit comments on the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule. NCBA filmed, edited, and published the video without any direction from EPA.” Follow Associated Press environmental writer Michael Biesecker at http://twitter.com/mbieseck More than a quarter-million people follow Tim MacRae, as “Timmac,” on a platform called Twitch. They make it possible for him to play video games and make a living doing it. Here, he offers insight into how playing video games can translate into a six-figure salary.
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Justice Dept. to help in Iowa case of slain transgender teen

The Justice Department has sent a federal hate crimes lawyer to Iowa to help prosecute a man charged with killing a transgender teenager last year, an unusual decision by Attorney General Jeff Sessions even as he takes other steps to erode the rights of transgender people broadly. The case involves Jorge Sanders-Galvez, 23, who is charged with killing 16-year-old Kedarie Johnson in Burlington, Iowa, in March 2016. Authorities have not disclosed a motive, but Johnson’s relatives say he may have …
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Family of girl who fell to death on cruise ship searching for answers

MIAMI – The great uncle of an 8-year-old girl who fell to her death on a Carnival Cruise Line ship Saturday said the family is searching for answers in the girl’s death. “We are here in Miami to find answers, to find what happened aboard the ship,” Damien Fox told Local 10 News in an exclusive interview Sunday. More Miami Headlines Girl dies after falling in cruise ship at PortMiami The Miami-Dade Police Department said Zion Smith fell from a deck inside the Carnival Glory cruise …
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Deadline on probe of Phoenix police immigration policy looms

The Arizona attorney general on Monday found that the Phoenix Police Department was not violating a state law that requires officers to inquire about the legal status of people they suspect of being illegally in the country. Republican Sen. John Kavanagh complained last month that a new police policy illegally restricted when officers can make those inquiries and violates Arizona’s 2010 law known as SB1070. Attorney General Mark Brnovich issued a written decision that rejected Kavanagh’s compla…
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Irma-Related Lawsuits Against FP&L Smell Like Greed and Petty Politics

Irma-Related Lawsuits Against FP&L Smell Like Greed and Petty Politics

In the days following Hurricane Irma, a handful of elected officials across the state became inundated with calls from frustrated constituents who were still waiting for power to be restored. The politicians, thinking only of how Irma’s damage could hurt them at the ballot box, started pointing the finger of blame at the power companies, setting arbitrary deadlines for power to be restored, and threatened lawsuits. Hurricane Irma couldn’t have taken a more destructive path for the s…
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Miami startup raises $1M to provide affordable legal services online

Miami startup Court Buddy has raised $1 million, a milestone event that puts the company among just 14 to have raised seven figures or more in …
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No charges for man who asked if US senator’s child kidnapped

A man who was kicked out of a televised town hall for asking Republican U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey an unsettling question about whether his daughter had been kidnapped won’t face charges, a prosecutor said Monday. Simon Radecki’s question was inappropriate and offensive but was within the bounds of free speech, District Attorney John Morganelli said, overruling police who initially planned to charge him. Radecki, a 28-year-old activist, was picked ahead of time to be one of Toomey’s questioners at the Aug. 31 event at a PBS station in Bethlehem. When it was his turn, he thanked Toomey for taking questions but then veered off-script and said: “I know we’ve been here a while. You probably haven’t seen the news. Can you confirm whether or not your daughter Bridget has been kidnapped?” Police yanked Radecki off stage as he continued, “The reason I ask is because that’s the reality of families that suffer deportation … .” Nothing happened to Toomey’s daughter, and Toomey called it a “ridiculous question.” The rest of the town hall went on without incident. Radecki said Monday he was trying to make a point about the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA. President Donald Trump recently ended the Obama-era program, which shielded from deportation nearly 800,000 young immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children, and gave Congress six months to come up with a replacement. Bethlehem police initially told Radecki he would be charged, but Morganelli told them to hold off while he reviewed the case. The prosecutor said he considered two charges — disrupting a public meeting and disorderly conduct — and concluded that Radecki broke no law. “Clearly, Mr. Radecki’s question was stated in a callous manner without regard for what impact it might have on Senator Toomey” or his family, Morganelli said. “Nevertheless, the criminal law cannot be utilized to remedy insensitive conduct.” Morganelli, a Democrat, informed Toomey of his decision via text. Toomey replied that he understood, the prosecutor said. Toomey’s spokesman, Steve Kelly, called Radecki’s question “reprehensible” and “inherently threatening,” but he said the senator accepted Morganelli’s legal judgment. Witold Walczak, legal director for the American Civil Liberties Union’s Pennsylvania chapter, said Morganelli made the right call. “The government can’t prosecute people for asking elected officials dumb, provocative or even offensive questions, just like prosecutors can’t charge politicians for making stupid and insulting statements (boy would they be busy!),” Walczak said via email. “Freedom of speech doesn’t always produce kind, thoughtful and wise expression.” Radecki works for Make the Road Pennsylvania, an advocacy group for Hispanic immigrants. He said the hypothetical question was planned by the group and was meant to convey how thousands of immigrant parents fear their children will be deported. Asked how he felt about Morganelli’s decision, Radecki said: “My friends who are DACA recipients are way more on my mind than what happened today. My concern (is) about what could happen to them in the next few months or next few years, the tons and tons of people who now need to prepare for who knows what.” Toomey has said that while people brought to the U.S. illegally as children are “not at fault and deserve our support,” President Barack Obama didn’t have legal authority to create the DACA program. He called on Congress to pass a comprehensive immigration overhaul that includes an accommodation for young immigrants.
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Court: Inmate fired as law librarian can sue for retaliation

A federal appeals court has reinstated a lawsuit filed by an inmate who lost his job at a Pennsylvania county jail’s law librarian, allegedly for helping other inmates conduct legal research. The Altoona-Mirror reports Monday that the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has reinstated Gary Vaughn Jr.’s lawsuit against Cambria County prison officials and the judge who ordered him removed last year. Vaughn ran a pawn shop called Gary’s Steals and Deals and was sentenced earlier this year to federal…
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A look at the president’s immigration demands

President Donald Trump has unveiled a long list of immigration priorities he says must be included as part of any legislative package extending protections for young immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children. What the president is demanding from Congress: BORDER SECURITY —Construct a wall along the southern border; increase security on the northern border. —Make it easier to deport unaccompanied minor children caught crossing the border. The U.S. experienced a surge of border cro…
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